Current RNA News and Events

Current RNA News and Events, RNA News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
How fast could SARS-CoV-2 be detected?
Researchers from Peking University developed an accurate, high-speed (?10 min for RNA analysis and ?5 min for immunoassay), portable bifunctional electrical detector based on graphene field-effect transistors for SARS-CoV-2 through either nucleic acid hybridization or antigen-antibody protein interaction. This approach enables high-throughput point-of-care testing outside of specialized diagnostic laboratories, which is of extreme importance for controlling the ongoing pandemic and support resumption of normal life and economic conditions. (2021-01-25)

Regulating the ribosomal RNA production line
The enzyme that makes RNA from a DNA template is altered to slow the production of ribosomal RNA (rRNA), the most abundant type of RNA within cells, when resources are scarce and the bacteria Escherichia coli needs to slow its growth. (2021-01-22)

OHIO researchers ID potential target for anti-viral drugs to battle COVID
This is a non-coding section of the RNA, which means that it is not translated into a protein, but it is likely key to the virus's replication. (2021-01-20)

New approach emerges to better classify, treat brain tumors
A look at RNA tells us what our genes are telling our cells to do, and scientists say looking directly at the RNA of brain tumor cells appears to provide objective, efficient evidence to better classify a tumor and the most effective treatments. (2021-01-19)

Getting under your skin: Molecular research builds new understanding of skin regeneration
New research from Northwestern University has found new evidence deep within the skin about the mechanisms controlling skin repair and renewal. (2021-01-19)

Sequencing of wastewater useful for control of SARS-CoV-2
Viral genome sequencing of wastewater can detect new SARS-CoV-2 variants before they are detected by local clinical sequencing, according to a new study reported in mBio, an open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology. The ability to track SARS-CoV-2 mutations in wastewater could be particularly useful for tracking new variants, like the B.1.17 strain that is now widespread in the U.K. and has already been introduced in the US. (2021-01-19)

Gene-editing 'scissor' tool may also be a 'dimmer switch'
In a series of experiments with laboratory-cultured bacteria, Johns Hopkins scientists have found evidence that there is a second role for the widely used gene-cutting system CRISPR-Cas9 -- as a genetic dimmer switch for CRISPR-Cas9 genes (2021-01-19)

New computational tool reliably differentiates between cancer and normal cells from single-cell RNA-sequencing data
MD Anderson researchers have developed a new computational tool to accurately differentiate between cancer cells and normal cells when analyzing large single-cell RNA-sequencing data. (2021-01-18)

Sensei RNA: Iron fist in a velvet glove
Scientific pursuit has the habit of offering chance discoveries if we think about things differently. Here is a story behind one serendipitous discovery from the lab of Arati Ramesh at NCBS, Bangalore. (2021-01-18)

Why remdesivir does not fully stop the coronavirus
Their results explain why the drug has a rather weak effect (2021-01-18)

New videos show RNA as it's never been seen
Using data from RNA-folding experiments, the researchers generated the first-ever data-driven movies of how RNA folds as it is made by cellular machinery. By watching their videos of this folding occur, the researchers discovered that RNA often folds in surprising, perhaps unintuitive ways, such as tying itself into knots. (2021-01-15)

Triggering tumor antiviral immune response in triple negative breast cancer
Researchers at Baylor College of Medicine have discovered how therapeutics targeting RNA splicing can activate antiviral immune pathways in triple negative breast cancers (TNBC) to trigger tumor cell death and signal the body's immune response. (2021-01-14)

New molecular structures associated with ALS
Researchers from the University of Seville and the University of Pavia have identified a link between Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) and the accumulation of DNA-RNA hybrids in the genome. The accumulation of these hybrids causes increased genomic damage and boosts genetic instability. This finding will make it possible to better understand the molecular basis of the disease, as well as to propose new solutions to curb it. (2021-01-13)

BU researchers uncover viral small RNAs in mosquito cells
Researchers from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) provide a new genomics resource that details the small RNA transcriptomes (gene expression) of four bio-medically important mosquito species. (2021-01-13)

High-speed atomic force microscopy visualizes cell protein factories
Factor-pooling by ribosomes caught on video using state-of-art high-speed atomic force microscopy technology. (2021-01-08)

Novel RNA factors may help cancer cells thrive
Recent work by researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital pinpoints critical changes in an enzyme known as DICER, which create a cascade of effects on this microRNAome. The team identified primary actors circ2082, a circular RNA, and RBM3, an RNA-binding protein, which form a complex with DICER to trap it in the nucleus of glioblastoma cells, therefore disrupting the cytoplasmic microRNAome. (2021-01-08)

Response to infection therapy better understood thanks to a new technique
A sequencing-based solution can be utilised to determine infection clearance and microbiota recovery. Next, the researchers will apply the technique to investigate the coronavirus disease. (2021-01-07)

Drug combination increases susceptibility to chemotherapy in cases of severe neuroblastoma
Researchers at the University of Gothenburg now suggest a possible cure for children with hard-to-treat forms of neuroblastoma using a new combination of drugs. In a new study in the journal Cancer Research, they describe how a two small molecule-based drug combination likely inhibit the tumor's growth. (2021-01-07)

Mount Sinai researchers identify and characterize 3 molecular subtypes of Alzheimer's
Critical step toward developing precision medicine treatments (2021-01-07)

Tracking the formation of the early heart, cell by cell
Richard Tyser and colleagues have mapped the origins of the embryonic mouse heart at single-cell resolution, helping to define the cell types that make up the heart in the earliest days of development. (2021-01-07)

Making therapeutic sense of antisense oligonucleotides
In a significant extension of their previous research work, researchers at Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) and Ionis Pharmaceuticals, USA, have devised a molecular structural modification that boosts the efficacy of antisense oligonucleotide-based drugs by replacing the RNA strand of a heteroduplex oligonucleotide with DNA. This advance expands the scope and clinical applicability of nucleic-acid therapeutics across an ever-widening swathe of intractable diseases including neurological disorders. (2021-01-05)

Integrator: A guardian of the human transcriptome
In a joint collaboration, Danish and German researchers have characterized a cellular activity that protects our cells from potentially toxic by-products of gene expression. This activity is central for the ability of multicellular organisms to uphold a robust evolutionary 'reservoir' of gene products. (2021-01-05)

Study resolves long-running controversy over critical step in gene silencing
Researchers have identified a molecular ''address'' that explains how the cancer-related protein PRC2 binds to RNA to silence genes. The study resolves a longstanding debate about the contradictory behavior between PRC2 and RNA. The findings could have important implications for development of drugs to treat cancer and other diseases. (2021-01-04)

Discovery boosts theory that life on Earth arose from RNA-DNA mix
Chemists at Scripps Research have made a discovery that supports a surprising new view of how life originated on our planet. In a study published in the chemistry journal Angewandte Chemie, they demonstrated that a simple compound called diamidophosphate (DAP), which was plausibly present on Earth before life arose, could have chemically knitted together tiny DNA building blocks called deoxynucleosides into strands of primordial DNA. (2020-12-27)

Regulatory RNAs promote breast cancer metastasis
A gene-regulating snippet of RNA may contribute to the spread of many breast cancers. A molecule designed to destroy that RNA prevented metastases in animal models. The same strategy could be used to develop a new breast cancer drug. (2020-12-22)

Targeting the deadly coils of Ebola
Computer simulations of the Ebola virus structure are helping to crack its defenses. Ebola virus nucleocapsid stability conferred by RNA electrostatic interactions. XSEDE EMPOWER undergraduate program, allocations on TACC Stampede2 and PSC Bridges systems supported research. Research by Perilla Lab of the University of Delaware opens door for possible druggable sites targeting stability of Ebola virus nucleocapsid. (2020-12-21)

Fungal RNA viruses: Unexpected complexity affecting more than your breakfast omelet
Traditional approaches for studying fungal RNA viruses have relied upon sequence similarity, resulting in an underestimation of RNA viral genome diversity. Researchers from the University of Tsukuba used an advanced technological approach called Fragmented and Primer Ligated Double Stranded RNA sequencing, or FLDS, to identify viral sequences that were previously overlooked. They identified novel viruses and viral genome structures and show that FLDS is a powerful tool for understanding RNA viral genome diversity. (2020-12-21)

Brain stem cells divide over months
For the first time, scientists at the University of Zurich have been able to observe the way stem cells in the adult brains of mice divide over the course of months to create new nerve cells. Their study shows that brain stem cells are active over a long period, and thus provides new insights that will feed into stem cell research. (2020-12-21)

Corona: How the virus interacts with cells
Scientists from W├╝rzburg and the US have charted the first global atlas of direct interactions between SARS-CoV-2 RNA and human host cells. This may provide a starting point for novel treatments. (2020-12-21)

The far-reaching effects of mutagens on human health
Mutagenic threats to a cell's subtle machinery may be far more widespread than previously appreciated. In a new study, Michael Lynch and his colleagues demonstrate that DNA mutation itself may represent only a fraction the health-related havoc caused by mutagens. The study highlights the ability of mutagenic compounds to also affect the process of transcription, during which a DNA sequence is converted (or transcribed) to mRNA, an intermediary stage preceding translation into protein. (2020-12-21)

Research brief: Researchers discover new way to deliver DNA-based therapies for diseases
University of Minnesota Twin Cities researchers in the Department of Chemistry have created a new polymer to deliver DNA and RNA-based therapies for diseases. For the first time in the industry, the researchers were able to see exactly how polymers interact with human cells when delivering medicines into the body. This discovery opens the door for more widespread use of polymers in applications like gene therapy and vaccine development. (2020-12-18)

Mission to MAARS: Long non-coding RNA may play a key role in cardiovascular disease
Through utilization of genetically modified high-risk atherosclerotic mice, a research team from Brigham and Women's Hospital identified and characterized Macrophage-Associated Atherosclerosis lncRNA Sequence (MAARS), which is expressed specifically in macrophages in atherosclerotic plaques and contributes to the progression of the disease. (2020-12-17)

RNA molecules are masters of their own destiny
A new paper suggests that RNA molecules are responsible for regulating their own formation through a feedback loop. Too few RNA molecules, and the cell initiates transcription to create more. Then, at a certain threshold, too many RNA molecules cause transcription to draw to a halt. (2020-12-16)

Undruggable diseases gain a new RNA drug-discovery tool
A new RNA-targeting tool enables scientists to tackle difficult molecular recognition problems to aid drug discovery for incurable diseases. (2020-12-15)

RNA basic building block produced biocatalytically for the first time
Researchers from TU Graz and acib succeed in the first enzyme-driven biocatalytic synthesis of nucleic acid building blocks. This facilitates the development of antiviral agents and RNA-based therapeutics. (2020-12-15)

Scientists discover compounds that could have helped to start life on Earth
Scientists from St Petersburg University and Ben-Gurion University of the Negev have discovered natural cyclophosphates. These are possible precursors of phosphorus-containing molecules that are believed to have contributed to the emergence of primordial life on Earth. Cyclophosphates could have been formed billions of years ago in regions of elevated geothermal activity or during meteorite bombardments of the Earth. (2020-12-14)

tRNA fragments are involved in poststroke immune reactions
Following a stroke, the immune system triggers an inflammatory reaction that can either overshoot or turn into an immune deficiency. Now, a team of researchers - among them scientists from Goethe University Frankfurt, Germany - has shown that tRNA fragments play a role in this immune reaction. Fragments of tRNAs, which transport amino acids during protein synthesis ('transfer RNA'), were long merely considered cellular waste. The researcher's aim: To find new target structures for therapeutics. (2020-12-11)

A saliva-based smartphone platform could rapidly expand COVID-19 testing
Offering an ultrasensitive yet accessible approach to COVID-19 testing, a portable saliva-based smartphone platform provides results within 15 minutes without the resource-intensive laboratory tests the current (2020-12-11)

Rapid lateral flow immunoassay developed for fluorescence detection of SARS-CoV-2 RNA
Scientists from the Suzhou Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Technology have developed a novel amplification-free rapid SARS-CoV-2 nucleic acid detection platform based on hybrid capture fluorescence immunoassay (HC-FIA). (2020-12-10)

COVID-19 found in the cornea: Are transplants a transmission risk?
A multi-institutional study finds that COVID-19 can be found in post-mortem corneal tissue, highlighting the importance of the donor screening process. (2020-12-10)

Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.