Current Rabies News and Events

Current Rabies News and Events, Rabies News Articles.
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Rabies treatment demonstrated as safe and effective for use in children in first pediatric trial
A treatment, known as KEDRAB (Rabies Immune Globulin [Human]), currently used in the prevention of rabies has been demonstrated to be safe and effective for patients age 17 and under. (2021-02-10)

Smart vaccine scheme quick to curb rabies threat in African cities
More people could be protected from life-threatening rabies thanks to an agile approach to dog vaccination using smart phone technology to spot areas of low vaccination coverage in real time. The work could help save the lives of children worldwide. (2021-01-18)

Return of the zombie cicadas: WVU team unearths manipulative qualities of fungal-infected flyers
Cicadas infected with the parasitic fungus Massospora unknowingly engage in trickery with their fellow insects, resulting in effective disease transmission, according to West Virginia University-led research. Massospora manipulates male cicadas into flicking their wings like females - a mating invitation - which tempts unsuspecting male cicadas and infects them. (2020-07-27)

Grassroots dog vaccinations can help stop rabies, but not alone
While scientists are trying to find a vaccine for COVID-19, the rabies virus continues to kill 59,000 people every year. But unlike COVID, a vaccine has existed for more than a century. Vaccinating dogs can stop the spread to humans, but systemic challenges make that easier said that done. In a new study, scientists where grassroots campaigns to stop rabies work-- and where they need to be coupled with large-scale efforts. (2020-07-02)

Putting COVID-19 diagnostic tests to the 'test' -- how do they hold up?
As SARS-CoV-2 has the potential to mutate, it is important to check the efficacy of current diagnostic tests, say York University researchers, who found seven out of 27 methods had potential sequence mismatch issues that may lead to underperforming or false-negative COVID-19 test results. (2020-06-09)

Rapid infectious disease shifts in Chinese children and adolescents prior to COVID-19
Deaths of children and adolescents in China due to infectious diseases were becoming rare prior to the covid-19 pandemic, according to a new study. (2020-04-03)

Using social media to understand the vaccine debate in China
Vaccine acceptance is a crucial public health issue, which has been exacerbated by the use of social media to spread content expressing vaccine hesitancy. Studies have shown that social media can provide new information regarding the dynamics of vaccine communication online, potentially affecting real-world vaccine behaviors. A team of United States-based researchers observed an example of this in 2018 related to the Changchun Changsheng Biotechnology vaccine incident in China. (2020-02-25)

Rabies: New prophylactic and therapeutic avenues
Rabies is still responsible for approximately 60,000 human deaths per year mostly in Asia and Africa and affects especially underserved people. Prophylactic measures have significantly improved. They are now composed of the vaccine allied to purified human or equine rabies immunoglobulins. However, these immunoglobulins are expensive and not easy to reach in developing settings. Researchers have visualized one of the most potent and most broadly neutralizing human monoclonal antibody in interaction with the rabies glycoprotein. (2020-02-11)

Many rescue dog owners think they are imported (wrongly) into UK via Pet Travel Scheme
Many owners of rescue dogs imported into the UK believe they arrive through the European Union (EU) Pet Travel Scheme, which has less stringent requirements than the EU Balai Directive, which should be applied for these animals, find the results of a large survey, published in Vet Record. (2020-01-13)

Hundreds of novel viruses discovered in insects
New viruses which cause diseases often come from animals. Well-known examples of this are the Zika virus transmitted by mosquitoes, bird flu viruses, as well as the MERS virus which is associated with camels. In order to identify new viral diseases quickly and prevent possible epidemics, DZIF scientists at Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin are targeting their search at viruses in animals. In a current study, they have now discovered hundreds of novel viruses in insects. (2020-01-08)

Salmonella the most common cause of foodborne outbreaks in the European Union
Nearly one in three foodborne outbreaks in the EU in 2018 were caused by Salmonella. This is one of the main findings of the annual report on trends and sources of zoonoses published by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) and the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC). West Nile virus and STEC infections were reported at unusually high levels. (2019-12-13)

WSU's One Health approach is a two-for-one stop for health care in Tanzania
Promoting healthcare strategies that target both human and animal populations at the same time can save money, participant time and result in a two-for-one stop for health care services. (2019-11-25)

Scientists make vampire bats 'glow' to simulate vaccine spread
University of Michigan scientists and their colleagues used glowing fluorescent gel to test the potential effectiveness of vaccines to control rabies and other diseases in wild bats. (2019-11-18)

Researchers develop a faster, stronger rabies vaccine
Every year, more than 59,000 people around the world die of rabies and there remains no cheap and easy vaccine regimen to prevent the disease in humans. Now, researchers report in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases that adding a specific immune molecule to a rabies vaccine can boost its efficacy. (2019-11-14)

Scientists crack rabies virus weaponry
Researchers from Monash University and the University of Melbourne have found a way to stop the rabies virus shutting down the body's immune defence against it. In doing so they have solved a key scientific puzzle and have laid the foundation for the development of new anti-rabies vaccines. (2019-11-12)

Evidence of cross-species filovirus transmission from bats to humans
Virus spillover may be occurring between bats and humans in Nagaland, India, according to a new collaborative study by the National Centre of Biological Sciences (NCBS) in India, Duke-NUS Medical School in Singapore, and the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USUHS) in the USA. The study published in the scientific journal PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases, reaffirms the importance of virus surveillance at wildlife and human interfaces where the risk of virus spillover (transmission) may be highest. (2019-10-31)

Dog rabies vaccination programs affect human exposure, prophylaxis use
The World Health Organization has made it a goal to eliminate human rabies deaths due to dog bites by the year 2030. An increase in dog rabies vaccination rates decreases dog rabies cases, human exposure, and human deaths, researchers now report in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases. (2019-09-26)

UCI study reveals critical role of brain circuits in improving learning and memory
A University of California, Irvine-led team of scientists has discovered how newly identified neural circuits in the brain's hippocampal formation play a critical role in object-location learning and memory. (2019-09-23)

Single event or epidemic?
A team of scientists led by the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research has carried out an analysis of long-term data of an outbreak of classical swine fever in wild boars in the German federal state of Mecklenburg-Vorpommern that occurred between 1993 and 2000. The results show that non-infected regions have a higher risk of infection due to changes in movement patterns, particularly during the mast and rutting seasons (autumn and winter). (2019-08-19)

Older adults more likely to condemn even accidental harm
As people get older, they are more likely to condemn and want to punish others for acts that cause harm, even if no harm was intended, according to research presented at the annual convention of the American Psychological Association. (2019-08-09)

Self-sterilizing polymer proves effective against drug-resistant pathogens
Researchers have found an elastic polymer that possesses broad-spectrum antimicrobial properties, allowing it to kill a range of viruses and drug-resistant bacteria in just minutes - including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). (2019-08-01)

Changing climate may affect animal-to-human disease transfer
Climate change could affect occurrences of diseases like bird-flu and Ebola, with environmental factors playing a larger role than previously understood in animal-to-human disease transfer. Researchers from The University of Queensland and Swansea University have been looking at how different environments provide opportunities for animal-to-human diseases -- known as zoonotic diseases -- to interact with and infect new host species, including humans. (2019-04-30)

Developing a vaccine against Nipah virus
Researchers developed a novel recombinant vaccine called NIPRAB that shows robust immunization against Nipah virus in animal models and may be effective against other viruses in the same family. (2019-04-15)

Public health experts urge people to seek prompt medical advice if they suspect rabies exposure
There is only a short window of opportunity to seek medical help before rabies becomes almost invariably fatal, but people wait an average of 10 days before seeking medical advice following exposure to potentially rabid animals overseas, according to new research being presented at this year's European Congress of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) in Amsterdam, Netherlands (April 13-16). (2019-04-13)

You're probably not allergic to vaccines
Five facts about allergies to vaccines, pulled together by two McMaster University physicians. (2019-04-08)

Bid to beat rabies could benefit from oral dog vaccine, study finds
Vaccines hidden in dog food could help curb the spread of rabies in countries with large populations of stray dogs, research suggests. (2019-04-03)

Solving the mystery of Serengeti's vanishing wild dogs
More than 25 years ago, African wild dogs (Lycaon pictus) disappeared from Serengeti National Park. A firestorm of debate followed when one researcher claimed that handling by scientists was the cause. New research refutes that claim and offers another explanation. (2019-01-31)

Interventions in dog populations could reduce rabies in rural China
Domestic dogs play a key role in the transmission and expansion of rabies in rural areas of China, according to a study published Dec. 6 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Huaiyu Tian of Beijing Normal University, Hailin Zhang of the Yunnan Provincial Key Laboratory for Zoonosis Control and Prevention, Simon Dellicour of KU Leuven, and colleagues. (2018-12-06)

Treatment for canine leishmaniasis exists in Brazilian vaccine
A vaccine used to prevent dogs from contracting the deadly, parasitic disease canine leishmaniasis also can be used to treat currently infected dogs, found Morris Animal Foundation-funded researchers at the University of Iowa, providing a new avenue of treatment for millions of infected dogs globally. (2018-11-14)

Lassa fever vaccine shows promise and reveals new test for immunity
A new Lassa fever and rabies vaccine shows lasting immunity and suggests a new way to test for protection. (2018-10-11)

Scientists develop novel vaccine for lassa fever and rabies
A novel vaccine designed to protect people from both Lassa fever and rabies showed promise in preclinical testing, according to new research published in Nature Communications. The investigational vaccine, called LASSARAB, was developed and tested by scientists at Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia; the University of Minho in Braga, Portugal; the University of California, San Diego; and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health. (2018-10-11)

'Gut sense' is hardwired, not hormonal
Searching for a more direct connection between the gut and the brain, Duke researchers were shocked to see that distance spanned by a single synapse, relaying the signal in less than 100 milliseconds, less than the blink of an eye. The finding in the journal Science has profound implications for the understanding of appetite and appetite suppressants, most of which target slow-acting hormones rather than fast-acting synapses. (2018-09-20)

How rabies virus moves through nerve cells, and how it might be stopped
Researchers found that the rabies virus travels through neurons differently than other neuron-invading viruses, and that its journey can be stopped by a drug commonly used to treat amoebic dysentery. (2018-08-23)

Super-resolution microscope reveals secrets of deadly Nipah virus
The deadly Nipah virus and others like it assemble themselves in a much more haphazard manner than previously thought, new UBC research has found. The discovery could allow scientists to develop more effective vaccines and rule out many approaches to fighting these viruses. (2018-08-16)

A peek into the interplay between sleep and wakefulness
The ventrolateral preoptic nucleus (VLPO) in the brain plays a critical role in the initiation and maintenance of sleep, while the lateral posterior part of the hypothalamus contains neuronal populations implicated in maintenance of arousal. Now, a University of Tsukuba-centered study reveals that these arousal-related neurons are heavily innervated by GABAergic neurons in the preoptic area including the VLPO. The work provides important information to understand the mechanisms that control animals' sleep/wakefulness states. (2018-07-20)

How to slow down Ebola
The phylogenetic tree of the 2013-2016 Ebola epidemic doesn't just tell us how the Ebola virus was able to evolve: it also reveals which events and preventive measures accelerated or slowed down its spread. These findings were presented in Nature Communications and open up new perspectives for the containment of epidemics. (2018-06-11)

Where brain cells get their information may determine their roles in diseases
Salk scientists find differences in communication pathways to two cell types implicated in psychiatric and movement disorders (2018-05-01)

Rabies trick could help treat Parkinson's Disease
The rabies virus wreaks havoc on the brain, triggering psychosis and death. To get where it needs to go, the virus must first trick the nervous system and cross the blood brain barrier -- a process that makes it of interest in drug design. Now, scientists report in ACS Nano a way to exploit the rabies virus machinery to deliver a Parkinson's disease medication directly to the brain. (2018-04-25)

Brainy new approaches to autism, chronic pain, concussion and more
Technological advances have ushered in a new era of discovery in neuroscience. The Experimental Biology 2018 meeting (EB 2018) will feature an array of research findings on the brain and nervous system. The studies shed new light on the intricate circuitry behind our thought processes, feelings and behaviors and offer leads for both high-tech and low-tech treatment approaches. (2018-04-22)

New DNA screening reveals whose blood the vampire bat is drinking
The vampire bat prefers to feed on domestic animals such as cows and pigs. When it does so, there is a risk of transmission of pathogens. Now, a new study describes a new DNA method to efficiently screen many vampire bat blood meal and fecal samples with a high success rate and thereby determine which animals the vampire bats have fed on blood from. (2018-04-20)

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