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Current Racism News and Events, Racism News Articles.
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Study tracks public concerns on Twitter about COVID-19
Twitter users initially didn't feel positive about the state of the economy, prevention, treatment and recovery concerning COVID-19. That changed by the end of March 2020. In contrast, throughout the period examined from January to May 2020, the public, in general, felt negative about the way the pandemic had been handled by political leadership. (2020-10-28)

Black Hispanic individuals hardest hit by COVID-19
Results from a new study led by Boston Medical Center (BMC) demonstrate the disproportionate impact of COVID-19 on Hispanic groups within the US, with the most severe outcomes, including death and intensive care, among Hispanic Black individuals. (2020-10-27)

1 in 12 parents say their teen has attended a demonstration about racism or police reform
A growing number of demonstrators taking to the streets to protest police brutality and racial injustice may include teenagers, a new national poll suggests. (2020-10-26)

When reproductive rights are less restrictive, babies are born healthier
American women living in states with less restrictive reproductive rights policies are less likely to give birth to low-birth weight babies, according to a new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, published by Elsevier. The findings show that women, particularly US-born Black women, giving birth in states with less restrictive reproductive rights policies have a seven percent lower low-birth weight risk, compared to women in states with more restrictive policies. (2020-10-13)

Lack of diversity among cardiovascular health-care professionals continues
Despite working for more than two decades to address underrepresentation of women in cardiology, disparities among cardiovascular professionals continue to exist. Profound inequities also exist for individuals underrepresented in medicine, such as African Americans, Hispanic Americans and Native Americans, who constitute 32 percent of the U.S. population but only eight percent of practicing cardiologists (2020-10-13)

How scientific leaders can enact anti-racist action in their labs
A new paper provides 10 steps that principal investigators (PIs) and research group leaders can follow to help cultivate anti-racist professional and learning environments. V. Bala Chaudhary of DePaul University, Chicago, and Asmeret Asefaw Berhe of U.C. Merced present these guidelines in the open-access journal PLOS Computational Biology. (2020-10-01)

15-year trend persists in disparate insulin pump use in children
Insulin pumps are widely used in the management of type 1 diabetes (T1D) and reviews have shown insulin pump therapy to be associated with improved glycemic control, fewer severe hypoglycemia events, and improved quality of life. Yet, non-Hispanic white children (NHW) are more than twice as likely as non-Hispanic Black children (NHB) to use this technology. (2020-10-01)

Intersecting social inequities increase the likelihood of severe illness due to COVID-19
Black, South Asian and Aboriginal populations from disadvantaged socioeconomic backgrounds in Canada are nearly four times more likely to have three or more medical conditions that have been identified as risk factors for severe illness from COVID-19. (2020-09-24)

During pandemic, racism puts additional stress on Asian Americans
People of Asian ancestry face yet another set of challenges posed by racism and xenophobia which has soared during the COVID-19 pandemic. (2020-09-24)

Poll: Americans' views of systemic racism divided by race
In the wake of outrage across the nation and racial justice protests spurred by the deaths and injuries of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Jacob Blake and other Black Americans, more than half of Americans believe policing in the country is not fair, according to a new national poll released today by the UMass Lowell Center for Public Opinion. (2020-09-23)

Medical mistrust grounded in structural and systemic racism affects HIV care for Black women in the US South
For Black women in the southern United States, mistrust of the health care system that is grounded in structural and systemic racism is a key factor affecting participation in HIV prevention and treatment services, reports a study in the September/October issue of the Journal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care (JANAC). The official journal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care, JANAC is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer. (2020-09-17)

Male circumcision campaigns in Africa to fight HIV are a form of cultural imperialism
World Health Organization-recommended campaigns to circumcise millions of African boys and men to reduce HIV transmission are based more on systemic racism and 'neocolonialism' than sound scientific research, according to a critical appraisal published in Developing World Bioethics. (2020-09-10)

Story tips from Johns Hopkins experts on COVID-19
Story Tips from Johns Hopkins Experts on Covid-19 (2020-09-09)

Dismantling structural racism in nursing
Confronting the uncomfortable reality of systemic racism - the system that creates and maintains racial inequality in every facet of life for people of color - is having a national heyday. But calling out this injustice and doing something about it are two different things. (2020-09-09)

COVID-19 story tip: Racism amid the COVID-19 pandemic -- a path forward
Because SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, was first discovered in China, Chinese American families in the United States have reported an increase in racist experiences during the ongoing pandemic. (2020-09-08)

Study highlights ties between racism and activism in black youth
A new study finds that experiences with racism are associated with increased social consciousness and social justice activism in Black youth. (2020-09-08)

Images of captive torment in art
Between the arrival of pearl divers and war brides - long after Japanese performers toured Australia 150 years ago - an untold chapter of World War Two history has emerged in a new study of wartime art made by almost 5000 prisoners of war in Australia and New Zealand. Focusing on internment camps set up across Australia and NZ, Canterbury University and Flinders University art historians Richard Bullen and Tets Kimura examine some exquisite Japanese artworks produced during the extended period of war incarceration. (2020-09-04)

'Attack Helicopters' an online sub-culture to watch out for
Who identifies sexually as an 'attack helicopter?'' According to new QUT-led research some 'Incels' do, and while 'trolls' have been around almost as long as the Internet, the researchers say 'Incels' are a more recent and distinctly different cyber sub-culture which warrants more study. Their findings have just been published by open access journal First Monday. (2020-09-03)

Alzheimer's burden greater in rural Appalachia, study finds
Alzheimer's disease is more common in rural Appalachian Ohio communities than in other rural areas in the state - raising concerns about access to early, specialized care in a region where many residents face struggles getting the medical care they need, a new study has found. (2020-09-02)

Racial segregation drives disparities in COVID-19 and HIV diagnoses
Across the US, COVID-19 and HIV diagnoses are lowest in primarily white counties. They follow the same pattern, with diagnoses decreasing as the population of white residents in these counties increases. (2020-08-26)

When it comes to supporting candidates, ideology trumps race and gender
Voters who express prejudice against minorities and women are still more likely to support candidates who most closely align with their ideologies, regardless of the race or sex of such candidates, according to research published by the American Psychological Association. (2020-08-24)

Review: Consequences of systemic racism in urban environments
Even as studies have shown that the uneven distribution of urban heat islands, urban tree canopy cover, and urban environmental hazards, for example, are strongly dictated by structural racism and classism in cities, relatively few studies have addressed the varied contributions of social factors like race to ecological heterogeneity in cities. (2020-08-13)

Systemic racism has consequences for all life in cities
Social inequalities, specifically racism and classism, are impacting the biodiversity, evolutionary shifts and ecological health of plants and animals in our cities. That's the main finding of a review paper published Aug. 13 in Science led by the University of Washington, with co-authors at the University of California, Berkeley, and University of Michigan. (2020-08-13)

Racial discrimination linked to suicide
New research findings from the University of Houston indicate that racial discrimination is so painful that it is linked to the ability to die by suicide, a presumed prerequisite for being able to take one's own life, and certain mental health tools - like reframing an incident - can help. (2020-08-03)

High COVID-19 risk among health care workers, especially those from minority backgrounds
At the peak of the COVID-19 pandemic in the US and the UK, frontline healthcare workers -- Black, Asian, and minority ethnic backgrounds -- faced much higher risks of testing positive. (2020-07-31)

Looking up to the Joneses: Consequences of the perceptions of white wealth
In a pair of studies, social psychologists propose that widespread perceptions that white people are wealthy, and that Black people are poor, may shape the way people experience their own status. (2020-07-30)

Anti-Asian racism during COVID-19 has historical ties in United States
Anti-Asian hate crimes during health crises are unfortunately not new, according to a new academic paper examining the history of this phenomenon. The research team, including an Iowa State University criminal justice researcher, looked at how anti-Asian hate crimes during the COVID-19 pandemic have furthered the historical 'othering' of Asian Americans and reproduced inequalities. (2020-07-29)

New study finds racial disparities in COVID-19-related deaths exist beyond income differences in 10
New analyses by a team of researchers at NYU Grossman School of Medicine examine the interplay between race/ethnicity and income on COVID-19 cases and related deaths in 10 major US cities. (2020-07-28)

Study: Factors linked to structural racism put latino communities at risk for COVID-19
WASHINGTON, D.C. (July 23, 2020) -- Factors linked to structural racism put Latino communities in the U.S. at high risk of COVID-19, a study published today says. The new study is the first nationwide analysis of COVID-19 cases and deaths among Latinos. (2020-07-23)

Study finds clothing-based racist stereotypes persist against Black men
Hardworking or lazy; trustworthy or dangerous: People often make assumptions about someone's character and personality based solely on how they're dressed. A recent study from Oregon State University finds that while more formal clothing may deflect certain racially biased assumptions, many people still hold negative stereotypes about Black men based on what they're wearing. (2020-07-22)

Racial discrimination may adversely impact cognition in African Americans
Experiences of racism are associated with lower subjective cognitive function (SCF) among African-American women. (2020-07-21)

Anti-Asian hate crime during the COVID-19 pandemic
Since the outbreak of COVID-19 in Wuhan, China, the United States has seen a surge of Asian Americans reporting racially motivated hate crimes. Earlier this month, University of Colorado Denver School of Public Affairs professor Angela Gover, PhD, along with researchers from Iowa State University and RTI International, published a research paper outlining how COVID-19 has enabled the spread of racism and created national insecurity, fear of foreigners, and general xenophobia. (2020-07-21)

Lifetime discrimination and greater risk of high blood pressure in African Americans
Experiences of discrimination over a lifetime is associated with high blood pressure in African American adults, according to findings published this month in the journal Hypertension from researchers at the Urban Health Collaborative at Drexel University's Dornsife School of Public Health. (2020-07-17)

International conference on social determinants of health identified change needs
In November 2019, clinicians, health administrators, educators and researchers from around the world gathered in Toronto to discuss how to best address social determinants of health from a primary care perspective. (2020-07-14)

Study calls for action to protect BAME and migrant groups from economic impact of COVID-19
The COVID-19 lockdown has had a disproportionate economic impact on Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) migrants in the UK, new research, which also calls for racial justice, reveals today. (2020-07-13)

Access to nature requires attention when addressing community health needs
Nature is a tool to address deeply entrenched health disparities; health systems should work to increase nature access, as they have with other social determinants of health. (2020-07-09)

New in the Hastings Center Report: Health, race, and society during Covid-19
The latest issue is devoted to essays that examine how the pandemic has highlighted connections between health and social structures--concerning not just access to health care but also conditions of living that affect health, from inequality to political and environmental conditions. (2020-07-09)

Community and law enforcement partnerships best help kids who witness home violence
The Child Trauma Response Team, an innovative police and community-based organization partnership, demonstrated success at screening and treating children for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) immediately following incidents of intimate partner violence, according to a Rutgers-led study published in the Journal of Interpersonal Violence. (2020-07-08)

Does genomics perpetuate inequality?
A new Hastings Center special report takes a critical look at the role of genomics in perpetuating racism and inequality. (2020-07-08)

Medicare's race, ethnic data often undercounts minority populations, study finds
The information critical to a nationwide priority of reducing health care disparities among minorities is incomplete and inaccurate, according to a new Rutgers study. (2020-07-07)

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