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Current Radiation Therapy News and Events, Radiation Therapy News Articles.
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New research could lead to improved method of treating pancreatic cancer
A heating and freezing process known as dual thermal ablation can kill pancreatic cancer cells, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University at New York. (2018-02-26)

Precision cancer therapy effective in both children and adults
Three quarters of patients, both adults and children, with a variety of advanced cancers occurring in different sites of the body responded to larotrectinib, a novel therapy that targets a specific genetic mutation. Results of a phase 1/2 trial have been published in the New England Journal of Medicine. Unlike most cancer therapies, this oral treatment is based on the genetic traits of the tumor and not the organ where the cancer originated. (2018-02-21)

No relation between a supermassive black hole and its host galaxy!?
Using ALMA to observe an active galaxy with a strong ionized gas outflow from the galactic center, a team led by Dr. Toba of ASIAA (Taiwan) has obtained a result making astronomers even more puzzled -- the team clearly detected CO gas associated with the galactic disk, yet they have also found that the CO gas which settles in the galaxy is not affected by the strong ionized gas outflow launched from the galactic center. (2018-02-20)

Pulsating Aurora mysteries uncovered with help from NASA's THEMIS mission
The precise mechanism driving pulsating auroras, long unknown, has now been identified with help from NASA's THEMIS mission. (2018-02-20)

New research highlights how cancer cells repair themselves following proton beam therapy
Collaborative research conducted in Liverpool and Oxford, published in The Red Journal, identifies the specific cellular process that helps cancer cells damaged as a result of proton beam therapy, repair themselves. (2018-02-15)

Australian fire beetle avoids the heat
The Australian jewel beetle Merimna atrata has several heat sensors. Originally it was thought that it uses them to detect forest fires as the insect lays its eggs in the wood of burned eucalyptus trees. Researchers at the University of Bonn were finally able to refute this hypothesis. Instead, the beetle appears to need its heat sensors for a different purpose: to not burn its feet on landing. The study has now been published in the journal PLOS ONE. (2018-02-15)

Cutting off cervical cancer's fuel supply stymies tumors
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have shown that cervical tumors that don't respond to radiation may be vulnerable to therapies that also attack the cancer's fuel supply. (2018-02-14)

A gut reaction...on a chip
researchers from the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University, Instituto Superior Técnico (IST, Portugal), Boston Children's Hospital, and Harvard Medical School (HMS) have published a study using an organ-on-a-chip (Organ Chip) model of the human gut that reveals the intestinal blood vessel cells may play an important part in radiation-induced intestinal injury, and it confirms that a potential radioprotective drug, dimethyloxaloylglycine (DMOG), suppresses the intestine's responses to radiation injury. (2018-02-14)

Patients lack information about imaging exams
Patients and their caregivers desire information about upcoming imaging examinations, but many are not getting it, according to a new study. The researchers found that half of all patients and caregivers end up seeking information on their own. (2018-02-13)

Nivolumab immunotherapy safe, feasible during chemoradiation for adv. head and neck cancer
Analysis of a clinical trial, RTOG Foundation 3504, finds that nivolumab immunotherapy can be administered safely in conjunction with radiation therapy and chemotherapy for patients with newly diagnosed local-regionally advanced head and neck cancers. (2018-02-13)

Cabozantinib shows significant first-line activity for differentiated thyroid cancer
Results of a new phase II clinical trial indicate that cabozantinib offers an active therapy option for patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) that has progressed following surgery and treatment with radioactive iodine (RAI). Thirty-four of 35 patients in the trial experienced a reduction in tumor size following treatment with the targeted kinase inhibitor, and more than half experienced reductions in excess of 30 percent. (2018-02-13)

Phase II trial shows activity of durvalumab in recurrent/metastatic head and neck cancer
Analysis of the phase II CONDOR trial indicates that the immune checkpoint inhibitor durvalumab is tolerable among heavily pre-treated patients with recurrent or metastatic head and neck cancer and has the potential to slow growth in tumors with low or negative expression of the PD-L1 protein. (2018-02-13)

Lower-dose radiation effective, safe for HPV+ head & neck cancer after induction chemo
Results of the phase II OPTIMA clinical trial indicate that patients with head and neck cancers associated with the human papillomavirus (HPV), including those with advanced nodal disease, can receive substantially lower radiation doses safely and effectively if they respond to induction chemotherapy initially. (2018-02-13)

Brain sciences researcher pinpoints brain circuit that triggers fear relapse
Steve Maren, the Claude H. Everett Jr. '47 Chair of Liberal Arts professor in the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences at Texas A&M University, and his Emotion and Memory Systems Laboratory (EMSL) have made a breakthrough discovery in the process of fear relapse. (2018-02-13)

Cancer killing clue could lead to safer and more powerful immunotherapies
The study, led by Dr Misty Jenkins from the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research, explains the crucial mechanisms by which CAR-T cell therapy is able to rapidly target and kill cancer cells, and why it may cause serious side effects. (2018-02-12)

Intense laser experiments provide first evidence that light can stop electrons
By hitting electrons with an ultra-intense laser, researchers have revealed dynamics that go beyond 'classical' physics and hint at quantum effects. (2018-02-07)

Clocking electrons racing faster than light in glass
Living life in the fast lane can be tremendously exciting, giving us the 'time of our lives' but how long does it really last? Experiments at the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (TIFR), Mumbai have answered this question for a bunch of electrons traveling faster than light (fasten your seatbelts!) through a piece of glass. This study has appeared in the Physical Review Letters on 5 February 2018. (2018-02-06)

Advances open new frequency range for wireless communications
The 'internet of things,' which make everything from your toaster to your front door accessible online, has driven an explosion in data traffic and taken up huge amounts of bandwidth. However, a new range of frequencies in the terahertz region of the spectrum may soon be available for use. A paper in this week's APL Photonics demonstrates the feasibility of using THz carrier waves for data transmission in diverse situations and environments. (2018-02-06)

The future of wireless communications is terahertz
Electrical and optical engineers in Australia have designed a novel platform that could tailor telecommunication and optical transmissions. They experimentally demonstrated their system using a new transmission wavelength with a higher bandwidth capacity than those currently used in wireless communication. Reported this week in APL Photonics, these experiments open up new horizons in communication and photonics technology. (2018-02-06)

A new radiation detector made from graphene
Graphene is a remarkable material: light, strong, transparent and electrically conductive. It can also convert heat to electricity, and researchers have recently exploited this thermoelectric property to create a new kind of radiation detector. Classified as a bolometer, the new device has a fast response time and works over a wide range of temperatures. With a simple design and relatively low cost, this device could be scaled up, enabling a wide range of commercial applications. (2018-02-06)

VCU scientists seek to perfect calculations for comparing cervical cancer radiation doses
Research from VCU Massey Cancer Center has found that one of the standard practices for comparing cervical cancer radiation therapy treatments may be misleading, and the use of an alternative mathematical formula could be used to more effectively predict and potentially improve outcomes for patients. (2018-02-06)

Scientists explain the impacts of aerosol radiative forcing
Aerosol optical properties and direct radiative effects on surface irradiance were examined using seven years (2006-2012) of Cimel sunphotometer data collected at Panyu--the main atmospheric composition monitoring station in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region of China. Optical properties and radiative impacts of the absorbing particles can be used to improve the accuracy of inversion algorithms for satellite-based aerosol retrievals in the PRD region and to better constrain the climate effect of aerosols in climate models. (2018-02-05)

Weight loss surgery improves microvascular complications in obese diabetic patients
In a BJS (British Journal of Surgery) analysis of published studies in obese patients with type 2 diabetes, researchers found that weight loss surgery helps prevent the development of microvascular complications--which affect small blood vessels--better than medical treatment. The analysis was conducted by investigators from the Surgical Department of the University of Heidelberg in cooperation with the Study Center of the German Surgical Society. (2018-02-05)

Scientists target glioma cancer stem cells, which could improve patient survival
Brain tumors are responsible for 25 percent of cancer-related deaths in children and young adults. Despite initial response to treatment, most aggressive brain tumors eventually recur and are ultimately incurable. Multiple studies suggest that cancer stem cells within these tumors resist therapy and are responsible for tumor recurrences. Researchers at Dartmouth's Norris Cotton Cancer Center have devised a strategy to treat these tumors by identifying a secretion-mediated pathway that's essential for maintaining glioma cancer stem cells. (2018-02-05)

Adding crizotinib to radiation therapy may help preserve hearing in patients with NF2
A Massachusetts General Hospital research team reports that the use of crizotinib to block a specific molecular pathway both enhanced the radiosensitivity of tumors in mouse models of NF2, allowing a reduction in radiation dosage, and inhibited the growth of cultured tumor cells from NF2 patients. (2018-02-05)

New focus on where heart disease and breast cancer treatment meet
The American Heart Association has released the first scientific statement about heart disease and breast cancer, calling for more research and collaboration between the fields of oncology and cardiology to treat and prevent both diseases. (2018-02-01)

PSMA PET/CT visualizes prostate cancer recurrence early, impacts radiation therapy
A nuclear medicine scan may locate prostate cancer recurrence after radical prostatectomy early after disease recurrence and could help guide salvage radiotherapy, according to new research from the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA). The study, which utilizes PET/CT with gallium-68 prostate-specific membrane antigen (68Ga-PSMA-11), is documented in the featured article in the February issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine. (2018-02-01)

MD Anderson study evaluates need for biopsies during follow-up care in women with early breast cancer
In an analysis of more than 120,000 women diagnosed with and treated for early-stage breast cancer, researchers from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center determined the rate of additional breast biopsies needed for these patients during their follow-up care. The findings, reported in JAMA Surgery, are the first comprehensive nationwide population-based study regarding the need for breast biopsies performed during follow up after treatment for invasive breast cancer. (2018-01-31)

Vitiligo treated successfully with arthritis drug and light therapy
Building on prior research that examined the use of an arthritis medication to treat vitiligo, a team of Yale dermatologists has successfully applied a novel combination therapy -- the medication and light -- to restore skin color in patients. (2018-01-31)

Landmark international study: CAR T-cell therapy safe and effective in youth with leukemia
Results of the global, multicenter, pivotal phase 2 study that led to the first FDA approval of a gene therapy/cell therapy approach known as CAR T-cell therapy, were published today in the New England Journal of Medicine. Senior authors on the study include Stephen A. Grupp, of Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and Michael A. Pulsipher, M.D., of Children's Hospital Los Angeles (CHLA). (2018-01-31)

Reflective surfaces alleviate heatwaves
Unploughed fields and brighter cities could help to noticeably lower extreme temperatures during periods of hot weather, particularly in important agricultural regions and densely populated areas of Europe and North America. (2018-01-30)

No definitive causal link between sunbed use and malignant melanoma
A careful review of the currently available medical data shows that there is no proven causal relationship between moderate solarium use and increased melanoma risk. This is the conclusion reached by an international group of researchers headed by Professor Dr. Jörg Reichrath, Deputy Director of the Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Allergology at Saarland University Hospital in Homburg/Saar. (2018-01-30)

Newborns or survivors? The unexpected matter found in hostile black hole winds
A new theory from researchers at Northwestern University predicts the molecules are born in the winds with unique properties that enable them to adapt to and thrive in the hostile environment. (2018-01-30)

Microbubbles make breast cancer more susceptible to radiation therapy
Bursting oxygen-filled microbubbles in breast cancer makes tumors three times more sensitive to radiation therapy in preliminary tests with animal models of the disease (2018-01-29)

Enzyme inhibitor combined with chemotherapy delays glioblastoma growth
In animal experiments, a human-derived glioblastoma significantly regressed when treated with the combination of an experimental enzyme inhibitor and the standard glioblastoma chemotherapy drug, temozolomide. (2018-01-22)

Mortality of surgery vs. targeted radiation in early lung cancer patients
Among patients older than 80 years, 3.9 percent receiving surgery passed away within the 30-day post-treatment window, compared with 0.9 percent of patients receiving focused radiation. (2018-01-19)

Black hole spin cranks-up radio volume
Statistical analysis of supermassive black holes suggests that the spin of the black hole may play a role in the generation of powerful high-speed jets blasting radio waves. By analyzing nearly 8000 quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, research team found that the oxygen emissions are 1.5 times stronger in radio loud quasars than in radio quiet quasars. This implies that spin is an important factor in the generation of jets. (2018-01-12)

No planets needed: NASA study shows disk patterns can self-generate
A new NASA study shows rings, arcs and spirals in disks around stars may not be caused by planets. They may self-generate. (2018-01-11)

The complexities of clouds and the seeds that make them
In an effort to understand exactly how the micro and macro cloud properties interact with atmospheric particles, a collaborative research team conducted a modeling study analyzing three well-documented weather systems that occurred in March of 2000 over the southern Great Plains in the United States. (2018-01-10)

NUST MISIS scientists manage to observe the inner structure of photonic crystals
Photonic crystals are perfect materials for controlling light beams. The crystals almost managed to become the basis for the production of optical processors several years ago, if not for one highly ranked official saying 'no'. Similar to many other materials whose properties strongly depend on their structure, photonic crystals have an issue of reproducibility. To put it more exactly, no one has yet managed to create two large and completely similar photonic crystals. (2018-01-09)

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