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Current Radioactivity News and Events, Radioactivity News Articles.
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An emergency method for measuring strontium levels in milk can be used in routine studies
The UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country's Nuclear and Radiological Safety research group is participating in validations of methods proposed by the International Atomic Energy Agency. In a recently published study, this group has tested the viability of a method proposed by the international agency to measure radioactive strontium in milk, developed for cases of nuclear emergency, so that it can be incorporated into routine radiological monitoring measurements. (2017-09-08)

Eating triggers endorphin release in the brain
Finnish researchers have revealed how eating stimulates brain's endogenous opioid system to signal pleasure and satiety. (2017-08-28)

HIIT releases endorphins in the brain
Finnish researchers at the University of Turku have revealed that exercise-induced endorphin release in the brain depends on the intensity of the exercise. Endorphin release induced by exercise may be an important mechanism which affects exercise motivation and maintenance of regular physical activity. (2017-08-24)

A silent search for dark matter
Results from its first run indicate that XENON1T is the most sensitive dark matter detector on Earth. The sensitivity of the detector -- an underground sentinel awaiting a collision that would confirm a hypothesis - stems from both its size and its 'silence.' (2017-08-22)

Fungi can be used as biomonitors for assessing radioactivity in our environment
The Environmental Radioactivity Laboratory of the UEx has carried out a study to quantify radioactive presence in fungi. According to the research, this quantification is made using transfer coefficients that compare the radioactive content in the receptor compartment (fungi) of the radioactive contamination, to that existing in the transmitter compartment (soil). From the study, we may conclude that fungi can be used when assessing the presence or absence of radioactive contamination in the soil. (2017-07-13)

Coral may hold cancer insights
Stanford researchers are exploring how corals that re-colonized Bikini Atoll after nuclear bomb tests 70 years ago have adapted to persistent radiation. Their work is featured in a PBS series. (2017-06-28)

Personalized PRRT improves radiation delivery to neuroendocrine tumors
Neuroendocrine cancer is exceedingly difficult to manage and unlikely to be cured, but researchers intend to slow progression of these tumors and aid survival by personalizing patient dose of peptide-receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT), according to research presented at the 2017 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI). (2017-06-12)

UNIST improves remote detection of hazardous radioactive substances
A research team, led by South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology has proposed a new method that might be used to detect nuclear hazards from up to a few hundred meters away. (2017-06-09)

Social laughter releases endorphins in the brain
Finnish and British researchers have revealed how laughter releases endorphins in the human brain. The more opioid receptors the participants had in their brain, the more they laughed during the experiment. (2017-06-01)

Brain opioids help us to relate with others
A new Finnish research reveals how brain's opioids modulate responses towards other people's pain. (2017-05-30)

Study analyzes foods for radioactive substances
In cooperation with the Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR), the Federal Office for Radiation Protection (BfS) is to analyze foods prepared within the scope of the BfR MEAL Study for radiation caused by radioactive elements such as uranium. Main focus will be on the foods most often consumed by the population in Germany. These include cereal products, vegetables and potatoes, dairy products, meat and fish. (2017-05-12)

Visualizing nuclear radiation
Extraordinary decontamination efforts are underway in areas affected by the 2011 nuclear accidents in Japan. The creation of total radioactivity maps is essential for thorough cleanup, but the most common methods do not 'see' enough ground-level radiation. (2017-03-22)

'Diamond-age' of power generation as nuclear batteries developed
New technology has been developed that uses nuclear waste to generate electricity in a nuclear-powered battery. A team of physicists and chemists from the University of Bristol have grown a man-made diamond that, when placed in a radioactive field, is able to generate a small electrical current. The development could solve some of the problems of nuclear waste, clean electricity generation and battery life. (2016-11-25)

Impact of the Fukushima accident on marine life, five years later
Five years ago, the largest single release of human-made radioactive discharge to the marine environment resulted from an accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in Japan. An article in the October issue of IEAM explores the environmental consequences in the marine environment, including the status of current research about the impact of the fallout on plant and animal life and what remains to be done as the radioactivity continues to spread. (2016-10-18)

Rising temperatures could accelerate radiation induced DNA effects in marine mussels
Increased sea temperatures could have a dramatic effect on radiation-induced damage in marine invertebrates, a study led by Plymouth University, in conjunction with the Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science (Cefas) suggests. (2016-08-23)

Sewage sludge could make great sustainable fertilizer
Ever thought of putting sewage on your plants? Scientists say thermally conditioned sewage sludge serves as an excellent fertilizer to improve soil properties. This was recently published in the open-access journal Frontiers in Nutrition. The major advantage over commercial fertilizers? Sustainable re-use of essential and finite phosphorus resources. (2016-08-15)

The preventive destruction
Employees of the Department of Celestial Mechanics and Astrometry NII PMM of Tomsk state university (Russia) and colleagues from St. Petersburg State University, Keldysh Research Center, and Research Institute Sirius are developing measures to protect the Earth from potentially dangerous celestial bodies. With the help of supercomputer SKIF Cyberia, the scientists simulated the nuclear explosion of an asteroid 200 meters in diameter in such a way that its irradiated fragments do not fall to the Earth. (2016-07-27)

Fukushima and the oceans: What do we know, 5 years on?
A major international review of the state of the oceans five years after the Fukushima disaster shows that radiation levels are decreasing rapidly except in the harbor area close to the nuclear plant itself where ongoing releases remain a concern. This work is presented at the Goldschmidt conference in Japan. (2016-06-30)

Radioactive cesium fallout on Tokyo from Fukushima concentrated in glass microparticles
New research shows that most of the radioactive fallout which landed on downtown Tokyo a few days after the Fukushima accident was concentrated and deposited in non-soluble glass microparticles, as a type of 'glassy soot.' These results are announced at the Goldschmidt geochemistry conference in Yokohama, Japan. (2016-06-26)

Cancer-preventing protein finds its own way in our DNA
Geneticists from KU Leuven, Belgium, have shown that tumor protein TP53 knows exactly where to bind to our DNA to prevent cancer. Once bound to this specific DNA sequence, the protein can activate the right genes to repair damaged cells. (2016-06-16)

Ambitious experiments cast light on far reaches of periodic table
A study of newly made chemical compounds is giving scientists a fresh understanding of an elusive element. (2016-05-23)

Radioactive isotopes reveal age of oil and gas wastewater spills
A Duke study shows that radium isotopes in soils can be used to determine the age of oil and gas wastewater spills. Three new isotopic age-dating methods developed by the team could be useful for identifying the source of a spill where it's not certain if contamination stems from recent unconventional oil and gas drilling or from older, conventional oil and gas operations in the same watershed. (2016-05-10)

Contamination in North Dakota linked to fracking spills
Accidental wastewater spills from unconventional oil production in North Dakota have caused widespread water and soil contamination, a Duke study finds. Researchers found high levels of contaminants and salt in surface waters polluted by the brine-laden wastewater, which primarily comes from fracked wells. Soil at spill sites was contaminated with radium. At one site, high levels of contaminants were detected in residual waters four years after the spill occurred. (2016-04-27)

OUP publishes free article collection about Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant disaster
March 11, 2016, marks five years since the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant disaster. In the last five years, researchers all over the world have been conducting substantial studies to find out the effect on the environment, human bodies, and our society. In honor of their great work, Oxford University Press has made 30 research articles about the accident from nine journals freely available to read online for a year. (2016-03-09)

Research demonstrates that air data can be used to reconstruct radiological releases
New research from North Carolina State University demonstrates that experts can use data from air sampling technology to not only detect radiological releases, but to accurately quantify the magnitude and source of the release. This has applications for nuclear plant safety, as well as national security and nuclear nonproliferation monitoring. (2016-02-29)

Screening truffles for radioactivity 30 years from Chernobyl
Some forest mushrooms, such as wild porcini, can accumulate dangerous levels of radioactivity from the soils they grow in. But until now it was unclear if the same was true for truffles, fungi that range among the most expensive foods in the world. Researchers have analyzed Burgundy truffles collected in central Europe and found they contain only negligible amounts of radioactive cesium, being safe for consumption. The results are published Feb. 25 in Biogeosciences. (2016-02-25)

New bacterial pump could be used to remove cesium from the environment by light
By specifically introducing mutations into key parts of a pump located within the bacterial cell membranes, scientists have been able to induce it to pump cesium, including cesium's radioactive isotopes. This could form part of a strategy for the decontamination of cesium, which was one of the main radioactive materials released in the disaster at the Fukushima nuclear power plant. (2016-02-22)

Study provides insights on sources of environmental contamination following Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster
Four years after Japan's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant disaster that led to major releases of radioactivity to environment, questions still remain regarding the original sources of radioactive contamination. (2016-01-19)

'Radiolabeling' lets scientists track the breakdown of drugs
A new iron-catalyzed reaction for labeling molecules with radioactive elements offers a unique method that could let chemists more easily track how drugs under development are metabolized in the body. (2016-01-13)

The patchy weather in the center of the Earth
The temperature 3,000 kilometers below the surface of the Earth is much more varied than previously thought, scientists have found. The discovery of the regional variations in the lower mantle where it meets the core, which are up to three times greater than expected, will help scientists explain the structure of the Earth and how it formed. (2015-12-17)

Higher levels of Fukushima cesium detected offshore
Scientists monitoring the spread of radiation in the ocean from the Fukushima nuclear accident report finding an increased number of contaminated sites off the US West Coast, along with the highest detection level to date, from a sample collected about 1,600 miles west of San Francisco. The level of cesium in the sample is 50 percent higher than other samples collected, but is still more than 500 times lower than US government safety limits. (2015-12-03)

New EU project designed to link diagnosis and treatment of diseases over the long term
An international team from four EU countries plans to use an innovative concept to improve the use of companion diagnostics in disease and develop new approaches to therapy in the long term. The idea is to combine the use of nanomedicines and short half-life radionuclides for imaging purposes in the living organism. (2015-11-20)

New method reveals female biased green sea turtle sex ratio in San Diego Bay
Scientists have for the first time determined the ratio of males to females in a wild foraging group of green turtles in the Eastern Pacific, which suggests that sea turtles may be vulnerable to feminization from the temperature rises expected with climate change. (2015-11-03)

International research team finds thriving wildlife populations in Chernobyl
A team of international researchers, including James Beasley, assistant professor of wildlife ecology at the University of Georgia Savannah River Ecology Laboratory and the Warnell School Forestry and Natural Resources, has discovered abundant populations of wildlife at Chernobyl, the site of the 1986 nuclear accident that released radioactive particles into the environment and forced a massive evacuation of the human population. (2015-10-05)

How much radioactivity is in infant formula?
Based on measurements of radioactivity in samples of infant formula manufactured and sold around the world, researchers estimate that infants 1 year of age or younger who consume these formulas would ingest a significantly higher radioactivity dose than reported levels, but lower than internationally recommended limits. The researchers report the radioactivity levels for each brand of formula in an article published in Environmental Engineering Science. (2015-10-01)

Dark matter: CRESST searches for 'lightweights'
Scientists have searched for the particles of dark matter in numerous experiments - so far, in vain. With the CRESST experiment, now the search radius can be considerably expanded: the CRESST detectors are being overhauled and are then able to detect particles whose mass lies below the current measurement range. As a consequence, the chance of tracking dark matter down goes up. (2015-09-08)

Radioactive contaminants found in coal ash
A Duke University-led study has found radioactive contaminants in coal ash from all three major US coal-producing basins. Levels of radioactivity in the ash were five to eight times higher than in normal soil or in the parent coal itself. This finding raises concerns about the environmental and human health risks posed by coal ash, which currently is unregulated and is stored in coal-fired power plants' holding ponds and landfills nationwide. (2015-09-02)

New NGA global map advances R&D in geophysics and nonproliferation
A team of researchers led by scientists at the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency published a new map Sept. 1 that characterizes the Earth's radioactivity and offers new and potential future applications for basic science research and nonproliferation efforts. The Antineutrino Global Map 2015, or AGM2015, is an unprecedented experimentally-informed model of the Earth's natural and manmade antineutrino flux. (2015-09-01)

New research allows doctors to image dangerous 'hardening' of the arteries
Researchers at the University of Cambridge, in collaboration with the University of Edinburgh, have shown how a radioactive agent developed in the 1960s to detect bone cancer can be re-purposed to highlight the build-up of unstable calcium deposits in arteries, a process that can cause heart attack and stroke. The technique, reported in the journal Nature Communications, could help in the diagnosis of these conditions in at-risk patients and in the development of new medicines. (2015-07-10)

Nothing escapes The Global Ear: Nuclear tests, volcanoes, earthquakes or meteors
From earthquakes in Nepal to volcanic eruptions in Chile, from meteors crashing to Earth to the songs of migrating whales in the Indian Ocean, The Global Ear hears all. The system, created by the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization has now created a Virtual Data Exploitation Centre, providing scientists and researchers from many different disciplines with data for research and enables them to publish new findings. (2015-06-17)

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