Current Radon News and Events

Current Radon News and Events, Radon News Articles.
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Catching nuclear smugglers: Fast algorithm could enable cost-effective detectors at borders
A new algorithm could enable faster, less expensive detection of weapons-grade nuclear materials at borders, quickly differentiating between benign and illicit radiation signatures in the same cargo. (2020-04-30)

Deep diving scientists discover bubbling CO2 hotspot
Hydrologists diving off the coast of the Philippines have discovered volcanic seeps with some of the highest natural levels of C02 ever recorded. The scientists were working in Verde Island Passage, one of the most diverse marine ecosystems in the world and is home to thriving coral reefs. (2020-01-22)

Employers key to addressing lung cancer disparity in rural Kentucky
According to a University of Kentucky study, worksite intervention may be key to connecting men in rural Kentucky with critical lung cancer prevention and control resources and services. (2019-12-19)

UCalgary research finds short-term radon test kits are not effective in measuring radon gas exposure
A University of Calgary led study finds the only reliable way to measure exposure to radon gas is with a long-term testing kit, 90 or more days. Researchers placed two test kits, a short term (five-day) and long term (90-day) in the same homes. Tests were conducted during summer and winter months. Findings showed the short-term kits were imprecise up to 99 percent of the time when compared to a long term test. (2019-12-03)

Scientists unpick the history of Western France, written in 300-million-year-old rainwater
For the first time scientists have been able to reconstruct the chemical composition of rainwater from 300-million-year-old minerals, allowing them to unpick some of the history of Brittany and Western France since the rain fell in the late Carboniferous period, just before the time of the dinosaurs. The results point to the area being mountainous and originally located close to the Equator. This work is presented at the Goldschmidt Geochemistry congress in Barcelona. (2019-08-20)

UToledo research links fracking to higher radon levels in Ohio homes
A new study at The University of Toledo connects the proximity of fracking to higher household concentrations of radon gas, the second leading cause of lung cancer in the US. (2019-06-18)

Radon inferior to radium for electric dipole moments (EDM) searches
An international research team led by the University of Liverpool has made a discovery that will help with the search for electric dipole moments (EDM) in atoms, and could contribute to new theories of particle physics such as supersymmetry. (2019-06-06)

Free lung cancer screening program builds valuable relationships with patients
A free, simple screening for lung cancer can save a patient money, while building a healthy relationship for any medical needs they may have in the future. The research, published in the Annals of Thoracic Surgery, shows the partnership can be beneficial for patients looking for cardiology specialists, family medical care and other health-related issues, as well as for medical facilities that offer the free screening. (2019-01-24)

Nobody wins in a landslide
The University of Cincinnati is working with the Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology to add specific details on landslides to the state's map of known hazards. (2018-11-06)

World's fastest camera freezes time at 10 trillion frames per second
What happens when a new technology is so precise that it operates on a scale beyond our characterization capabilities? Professor Jinyang Liang and his colleagues, led by Caltech's Lihong Wang, have developed what they call T-CUP: the world's fastest camera, capable of capturing ten trillion (10 exp 13) frames per second. This new camera literally makes it possible to freeze time to see phenomena--and even light!--in extremely slow motion. (2018-10-11)

Comprehensive report says tobacco control must be highest priority in cancer control
The highest priority in a national cancer control plan must be expansion of tobacco control -- the intervention with the largest potential health benefits -- according to a new American Cancer Society report, the second in a series of articles that together inform priorities for a comprehensive cancer control plan. (2018-10-10)

Cancer risk due to certain lifestyle and environmental factors is preventable
Almost four in every 10 new cases of cancer in Germany are attributable to lifestyle and environmental factors, including smoking, low physical activity, overweight, and infections. Hermann Brenner and his group of authors from the German Cancer Research Center report on how these risk factors affect the number of cancer cases in Germany in concrete terms. (2018-09-28)

How slick water and black shale in fracking combine to produce radioactive waste
Study explains how radioactive radium transfers to wastewater in the widely-used method to extract oil and gas. (2018-09-18)

Houseplants could one day monitor home health
In a perspective published in the July 20 issue of Science, a team of University of Tennessee faculty and a student from two unrelated disciplines -- plant sciences and architectural design -- explore the future of houseplants as aesthetically pleasing and functional sirens of home health. Their idea is to genetically engineer house plants to serve as subtle alarms that something is amiss in our home and office environments. (2018-07-20)

A carcinogen at the gym
Gyms are places people go to get healthier. But nearly half the gyms in the U.S. contain a potentially addictive carcinogen -- tanning beds, report UConn researchers in the July 18 issue of JAMA Dermatology. Exercise reduces the risk of every cancer except melanoma. Tanning beds in gyms make tanning seem like part of a healthy lifestyle, undermine public health messaging and target a vulnerable population. (2018-07-18)

XENON1T Experimental data establishes most stringent limit on dark matter
Experimental results from the XENON1T dark matter detector limit the effective size of dark matter particles to 4.1X10-47 square centimeters--one-trillionth of one-trillionth of a centimeter squared--the most stringent limit yet determined for dark matter as established by the world's most sensitive detector. (2018-05-29)

UMass Amherst physicists contribute to dark matter detector success
This week, scientists from around the world who gathered at UCLA at its Dark Matter 2018 Symposium learned of new results in the search for evidence of the elusive material in Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) by the DarkSide-50 detector. WIMPs have been candidate dark matter particles for decades, but none have been found to date. Andrea Pocar of UMass Amherst says the DarkSide detector his group helped to build has demonstrated the great potential of liquid argon technology in the search for WIMPs. (2018-02-21)

Some chemicals in smoke may be even more dangerous than previously thought
Though most 'low molecular weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons' (LMW PAHs) have not been shown to cause cancer alone, the study shows that in common combinations, these chemicals can help to spark the disease. (2017-11-30)

Tanning beds and risky behavior linked -- in men
Even though men use tanning beds at lower rates than women, men who tan tend to do it in riskier ways, according to a study by researchers at the University of Connecticut. The findings should help public health officials rethink how, and to whom, they're targeting anti-tanning messages. (2017-11-02)

Radon increases risk for malignant skin cancer
A new study by the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH) about residential radon exposure in Switzerland shows that the radioactive gas radon increases the risk for developing malignant skin cancer. (2017-06-16)

Poor overall environmental quality linked to elevated cancer rates
Nationwide, counties with the poorest quality across five domains -- air, water, land, the built environment and sociodemographic -- had the highest incidence of cancer, according to a new study published in the journal Cancer. (2017-05-08)

Large nuclear cardiology laboratory slashes radiation dose by 60 percent in 8 years
A large nuclear cardiology laboratory has slashed its average radiation dose by 60 percent in eight years, according to new research presented today at ICNC 2017 and published in JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging. The study in over 18,000 patients shows dose reductions were achieved despite a large number of obese patients. (2017-05-07)

Study finds 1 in 8 Calgary homes exceed Health Canada's acceptable radon level
Radon gas is a colorless, odorless radioactive gas that has been linked to lung cancer. University of Calgary, Cumming School of Medicine, researchers have proven it's prevalent throughout southern Alberta homes. Undertaking one of the largest Canadian municipal studies to date, Aaron Goodarzi, Ph.D., and his team tested radon levels in more than 2,300 Calgary and area homes. The results show that there is no unaffected neighborhood. The study is published in today's CMAJ Open. (2017-03-29)

UTA researchers to develop new math theory for improvement of imaging technology
Researchers at the University of Texas at Arlington are working on a project which could have a sizable impact on imaging technologies, by developing new mathematical theories that can help solve outstanding problems. Technologies that could benefit include: modern healthcare equipment, national security, space exploration and industrial applications. (2017-03-08)

Campus natural gas power plants pose no radon risks
When Penn State decided to convert its two power plants from their historic use of coal as a source of energy to natural gas, there was concern about radon emissions. Although radon is known to exist in natural gas, now Penn State research indicates that it does not escape from these two power plants in harmful amounts. (2017-02-06)

Career advice for young allergy patients
Approximately one-third of apprentices in Germany are at elevated risk of occupational asthma, allergies, and dermatitis. In this edition of Deutsches Ă„rzteblatt International, Katja Radon et al. use a systematic search of the literature as the basis for investigating the advice doctors should give to young people with allergic sensitization or a manifest prior allergic disorder, regarding their future careers. (2016-09-01)

UofL research shows that children at home did not prompt parents to test for radon, secondhand smoke
Luz Huntington-Moskos, Ph.D., R.N., C.P.N., UofL School of Nursing assistant professor, recently published findings in the journal Public Health Nursing that show the presence of children in the home did not motivate parents to test and mitigate for radon and secondhand tobacco smoke, both of which cause lung cancer. (2016-08-30)

Study: Unconventional natural gas wells associated with migraine, fatigue
New research suggests that Pennsylvania residents with the highest exposure to active natural gas wells operated by the hydraulic fracturing ('fracking') industry are nearly twice as likely to suffer from a combination of migraine headaches, chronic nasal and sinus symptoms and severe fatigue. (2016-08-25)

Thousands of new cancer cases in Ontario each year due to environmental exposures
Between 3,540 and 6,510 new cancer cases in Ontario each year result from environmental factors, says a new report from Cancer Care Ontario and Public Health Ontario (PHO). (2016-08-08)

Study links residential radon exposure to hematologic cancers in women
A new report finds a statistically-significant, positive association between high levels of residential radon and the risk of hematologic (blood) cancer in women. (2016-04-28)

Boston University enters research agreement with Janssen
In an effort to accelerate disease interception approaches to the management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung cancer, Boston University School of Medicine has entered into a $10.1 million research agreement with Janssen Research & Development, LLC, one of the Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies. (2016-03-22)

New explosion gas-signature models can help inspectors locate and identify underground nuclear tests
Through experiments and computer models of gas releases, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory scientists have simulated signatures of gases from underground nuclear explosions (UNEs) that may be carried by winds far from the detonation. (2016-03-16)

Lung cancer screening: New Canadian guideline
Adults aged 55-74 years who are at high risk of lung cancer -- current or former smokers (i.e., have quit within the past 15 years) with at least a 30 pack-year history or more -- should be screened annually up to three times using low-dose computed tomography (CT), according to a new guideline from the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care published in Canadian Medical Association Journal. (2016-03-07)

IASLC issues new statement on tobacco control and smoking cessation
The International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer today issued a new statement on Tobacco Control and Smoking Cessation at the 16th World Conference on Lung Cancer in Denver. The statement calls for higher taxes on tobacco products, comprehensive advertising and promotion bans of all tobacco products and product regulation including pack warnings. (2015-09-07)

GeoRef celebrates the year of the map
2015 represents the bicentenary of the William Smith Map, one of the most important geologic maps ever created and the first national geologic map ever produced. To celebrate, GeoRef, the world's largest geoscience reference database is adding approximately 25,000 map references. (2015-09-01)

Canada's radon guidelines are inadequate
Radon gas is a silent health threat, and Canada needs to align its guidelines for acceptable radon levels with World Health Organization limits, argues an editorial in Canadian Medical Association Journal. (2015-06-01)

Increased levels of radon in Pennsylvania homes correspond to onset of fracking
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health researchers say that levels of radon in Pennsylvania homes -- where 42 percent of readings surpass what the US government considers safe -- have been on the rise since 2004, around the time that the fracking industry began drilling natural gas wells in the state. (2015-04-09)

Methane in Arctic lake traced to groundwater from seasonal thawing
Global warming may ramp up the flow of methane from groundwater into Arctic lakes, allowing more of the potent greenhouse gas to bubble out into the atmosphere, according to a new study led by researchers at UC Santa Cruz. (2015-03-09)

Can inhaled oxygen cause cancer?
The ancient physician/alchemist, Paracelsus, said: 'The dose makes the poison.' According to a new study published in PeerJ, even oxygen may fall prey to the above adage. While essential to human life, aspects of oxygen metabolism may promote cancer. Capitalizing on the inverse relationship of oxygen concentration with elevation, researchers found lower rates of lung cancer at higher elevations, a trend that did not extend to non-respiratory cancers, suggesting that carcinogen exposure occurs via inhalation. (2015-01-13)

Smartphone network could track incoming cosmic rays, UCI-led research finds
Your smartphone could become part of the world's largest telescope. A team led by UC Irvine physicist Daniel Whiteson and UC Davis physicist Michael Mulhearn has designed an app to turn the global network of smartphones into a planet-sized cosmic ray detector, according to a paper posted today to the physics website arXiv. (2014-10-13)

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