Current Reactions News and Events

Current Reactions News and Events, Reactions News Articles.
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Decoding breast milk to make better baby formula (video)
What makes breast milk so good for babies? In this episode of Reactions, our host, Sam, chats with chemist Steven Townsend, Ph.D., who's trying to figure out which sugar molecules in breast milk make it so unique and difficult to mimic. (2021-01-19)

Controlling chemical catalysts with sculpted light
Using state-of-the-art fabrication and imaging, researchers watched the consequences of adding sculpted light to a catalyst during a chemical transformation. This work could inform more efficient -- and potentially new -- forms of catalysis. (2021-01-15)

Allergists offer reassurance regarding potential allergic reactions to COVID-19 vaccines
Reports of possible allergic reactions to COVID-19 vaccines have raised public concern; however, allergists note that allergic reactions to vaccines are rare, and COVID-19 vaccine allergic reactions will have a similarly low rate of occurrence. Individuals with a history of anaphylaxis to an injectable drug or vaccine containing polyethylene glycol or polysorbate should speak with an allergist before getting vaccinated, but patients with severe allergies to foods, oral drugs, latex or venom can safely receive the COVID-19 vaccines. (2020-12-31)

Novel public-private partnership facilitates development of fusion energy
PPPL working in coordination with MIT's Plasma Science and Fusion Center and Commonwealth Fusion Systems to develop a unique tokamak fusion device called ''SPARC.'' (2020-12-30)

New catalytic approach to accessing key intermediate carbocation
This study revealed the development of a novel iridium based catalyst. The catalyst is capable of accessing the carbocation intermediates of the reaction to achieve an unprecedented level of regioselectivity (>95%) and enantioselectivity (98%). This technology will have far-reaching implications in synthetic, organic, and pharmaceutical chemistry. (2020-12-21)

Inverted fluorescence
Fluorescence usually entails the conversion of light at shorter wavelengths to light at longer wavelengths. Scientists have now discovered a chromophore system that goes the other way around. When excited by visible light, the fluorescent dyes emit light in the ultraviolet region. According to the study published in the journal Angewandte Chemie, such light upconversion systems could boost the light-dependent reactions for which efficiency is important, such as solar-powered water splitting. (2020-12-18)

Will it kombucha? (video)
Kombucha is a bubbly, fermented tea that has gained popularity in the health and wellness scene over the last decade -- but what is it exactly? This week, the Reactions team breaks down kombucha's chemistry and investigates which ordinary beverages they can turn into kombucha. (2020-12-17)

Scientists discover compounds that could have helped to start life on Earth
Scientists from St Petersburg University and Ben-Gurion University of the Negev have discovered natural cyclophosphates. These are possible precursors of phosphorus-containing molecules that are believed to have contributed to the emergence of primordial life on Earth. Cyclophosphates could have been formed billions of years ago in regions of elevated geothermal activity or during meteorite bombardments of the Earth. (2020-12-14)

Chemists from RUDN University synthesized chitin-based antibiotics
?hemists from RUDN University discovered previously unknown derivatives of chitin, a biopolymer that forms the exoskeletons of insects and carapaces of crayfish and other arthropods. The new compounds and their nanoparticles have antibacterial properties and are able to catalyze chemical reactions. (2020-12-14)

Chemists from RUDN University used crab shells to improve palladium catalysts
?hemists from RUDN University synthesized soluble biopolymers based on chitin from crab shells. Together with palladium, they form effective catalysts for organic reactions, and their nanoparticles can be re-used over ten times. (2020-12-14)

Data-driven discovery of biomarkers pave way for improved diagnosis of contact allergy
With the help of algorithms, researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have identified markers that can differentiate between irritant eczema and contact allergy, two skin reactions that look similar but require different treatment. Their findings, which are published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), support the further development of an alternative to today's diagnostic patch tests. (2020-12-14)

Tiny bubbles on electrodes key to speeding up chemical processes
New Curtin University-led research has shown the formation of bubbles on electrodes, usually thought to be a hindrance, can be beneficial, with deliberately added bubbles, or oil droplets, able to accelerate processes such as the removal of pollutants such as hydrocarbons from contaminated water and the production of chlorine. (2020-12-10)

A molecule like a nanobattery
How do molecular catalysts function, and what effects do they have? A team of chemical scientists at the University of Oldenburg has come closer to the answers using a model molecule that functions like a molecular nanobattery. It consists of several titanium centres linked to each other by a single layer of interconnected carbon and nitrogen atoms. The researchers' recently published findings combine the results of three multi-year PhD research projects. (2020-12-08)

A study predicts smooth interaction between humans and robots
According to a new study by Tampere University in Finland, making eye contact with a robot may have the same effect on people as eye contact with another person. The results predict that interaction between humans and humanoid robots will be surprisingly smooth. (2020-12-07)

RUDN University chemists synthesized new fluorescent substances for medical applications
Indolizines are a group of substances with biological and optical properties. A team of chemists from RUDN University developed a new approach to the synthesis of indolizines using pyridinium salts and enamiones. The new substances turned out to be able to emit light in the green range which can be useful for medical applications. (2020-12-04)

Common pipe alloy can form cancer-causing chemical in drinking water
Rusted iron pipes can react with residual disinfectants in drinking water distribution systems to produce carcinogenic hexavalent chromium in drinking water, reports a study by engineers at UC Riverside. (2020-12-03)

Peanut treatment lowers risk of severe allergic reactions in preschoolers
This study is the first to demonstrate that exposing children to a small, regular dose of an allergen (in this case, peanuts) in a real-world setting (outside of a clinical trial) is effective in reducing the risk of allergic reactions. (2020-12-03)

Hidden network of enzymes accounts for loss of brain synapses in Alzheimer's
A new study on Alzheimer's disease by Scripps Research scientists has revealed a previously unknown biochemical cascade in the brain that leads to the destruction of synapses, the connections between nerve cells that are responsible for memory and cognition. (2020-12-03)

Breaking the rules of chemistry unlocks new reaction
Scientists have broken the rules of enzyme engineering to unlock a new method for creating chemical reactions that could unlock a wide range of new applications -- from creating new drugs to food production. (2020-12-01)

RUDN University chemists developed a method to synthesize compounds for the pharmaceutics
A team of chemists from RUDN University suggested a universal method to synthesize thienoindolizine derivatives. Because of their special properties, these substances can be used to manufacture antibacterial and antitumor drugs, as well as new materials for optoelectronics. (2020-11-29)

New procedure will reduce the need for rare metals in chemical synthesis
Researchers from Kanazawa University performed an important type of tertiary alkylative cross-coupling reaction without using a rare-metal catalyst. Such efforts are needed to improve the long-term sustainability of important chemical syntheses and minimize supply chain disruptions caused by pandemics and other crises. (2020-11-27)

Warwick scientists design model to predict cellular drug targets against COVID-19
A computational model of a human lung cell has been used to understand how SARS-CoV-2 draws on human host cell metabolism to reproduce by researchers at the University of Warwick. This study helps understand how the virus uses the host to survive, and enable drug predictions for treating the virus to be made. (2020-11-25)

Machine learning innovation to develop chemical library
Purdue University innovators are using machine learning models to create new options for drug discovery pipelines. Purdue innovators have introduced chemical reactivity flowcharts to help chemists interpret reaction outcomes using statistically robust machine learning models trained on a small number of reactions. (2020-11-18)

New semiconductor coating may pave way for future green fuels
Hydrogen gas and methanol for fuel cells or as raw materials for the chemicals industry, for example, could be produced more sustainably using sunlight, a new Uppsala University study shows. In this study, researchers have developed a new coating material for semiconductors that may create new opportunities to produce fuels in processes that combine direct sunlight with electricity. The study is published in Nature Communications. (2020-11-18)

Understanding astrophysics with laser-accelerated protons
Bringing huge amounts of protons up to speed in the shortest distance in fractions of a second -- that's what laser acceleration technology, greatly improved in recent years, can do. An international research team from the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung and the Helmholtz Institute Jena, a branch of GSI, in collaboration with the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, USA, has succeeded in using protons accelerated with the GSI high-power laser PHELIX to split other nuclei and to analyze them. (2020-11-16)

Chemistry: How nitrogen is transferred by a catalyst
Catalysts with a metal-nitrogen bond can transfer nitrogen to organic molecules. In this process short-lived molecular species are formed, whose properties critically determine the course of the reaction and product formation. The key compound in a catalytic nitrogen-atom transfer reaction has now been analysed in detail by chemists at the University of Göttingen and Goethe University Frankfurt. The detailed understanding of this reaction will allow for the design of catalysts tailored for specific reactions. (2020-11-13)

Elastic-free face masks can help some with allergies stay safe during COVID-19
A University of Cincinnati fellow presents a COVID-19 related case study during the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI) scientific meeting held November 13-15. (2020-11-13)

Selective encapsulation of ultrafine Pd and Pt nanoparticles within the shallow layers of MOF
A solvent assisted ligand exchange-hydrogen reduction (SALE-HR) strategy is demonstrated to selectively encapsulate ultrafine metal nanoparticles (Pd or Pt) within the shallow layers of a MOF, i.e., UiO-67, for highly efficient hydrogenation reactions. (2020-11-11)

Many with lupus at high risk for adverse reactions to pneumocystis pneumonia drug
New research shows that adults with systemic lupus erythematosus, who receive trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX), a prophylactic therapy to help prevent pneumocystis pneumonia, are at high risk for adverse reactions to the drug, particularly if they are also positive for anti-Smith (anti-Sm) antibodies. Details of the study was presented at ACR Convergence, the American College of Rheumatology's annual meeting. (2020-11-06)

NIH researchers identify gene in mice that controls food cravings, desire to exercise
National Institutes of Health researchers have discovered a gene in mice that controls the craving for fatty and sugary foods and the desire to exercise. The gene, Prkar2a, is highly expressed in the habenula, a tiny brain region involved in responses to pain, stress, anxiety, sleep and reward. The findings could inform future research to prevent obesity and its accompanying risks for cardiovascular disease and diabetes. (2020-11-05)

New multicomponent reaction frontiers
The synthesis of complex molecules such as drugs, requires a process that sometimes involves several phases that increase its cost and harden the access to the product. Now, a team of the University of Barcelona has designed a new methodological approach that combines multicomponent reactions with domino type processes -continuous transformations on an only compound- to ease the synthesis of high structural complex molecules. (2020-11-04)

Model for acid-tolerant yeast helps guide industrial organic acid production
Microbes and other microscopic organisms could serve as sustainable ''factories'' to create many types of industrial materials because they naturally convert nutrients such as sugars into byproducts. However, creating industrial amounts of organic acids from renewable resources poses a challenge, because not many organisms can grow in highly acidic environments. With the help of gene editing and computational modeling tools, a team of researchers explored one type of yeast that could survive in the harsh environment created by acidic products. (2020-11-04)

Mothers pass on allergies to offspring, Singapore preclinical study shows
Maternal antibodies primed to react to specific allergens can cross the placenta, passing on transiently allergic reactions to offspring, according to new preclinical research from a collaborative study by the Agency for Science, Technology and Research, KK Women's and Children's Hospital, and Duke-NUS Medical School in Singapore. The finding hints at why infants exhibit allergies so early in life and suggests possible targets for intervention. (2020-10-29)

A new RNA catalyst from the lab
On the track of evolution: a catalytically active RNA molecule that specifically attaches methyl groups to other RNAs - a research group from the University of Würzburg reports on this new discovery in Nature. (2020-10-28)

Making biodiesel from dirty old cooking oil just got way easier
Researchers develop a new sponge-like catalyst that is so tough it can make biodiesel from low-grade ingredients containing up to 50% contaminants. And it's so efficient it could double the productivity of manufacturing processes for transforming food scraps, microplastics and old tyres into high-value commodity chemicals. (2020-10-26)

Insights into the genetic architecture of penicillin allergy
In a study presented at the ASHG 2020 Annual Meeting, researchers found that thehistocompatibility complex gene HLA-B in penicillin allergy. (2020-10-26)

RUDN University chemist suggested synthesizing bioactive substances using a copper catalyst
A chemist from RUDN University used a copper catalyst in the click reaction of triazole synthesis. Triazoles are bioactive substances that are used to treat fungal diseases and synthesize pharmaceutical drugs and also play a role in polymer chemistry. The catalyst not only accelerated the reaction several times but also helped perform it at room temperature and without any bases or solvents. The reaction turned out to be almost 100% effective and had no by-products. (2020-10-22)

Why is fertilizer used in explosives? (video)
Over the last century, the compound ammonium nitrate has been involved in at least 30 disasters and terrorist attacks. Under normal circumstances, it's totally harmless and used in things like fertilizer, so what makes ammonium nitrate turn deadly?: https://youtu.be/-SeT3N3A19c. (2020-10-22)

New study shows how complex metabolism may have self-assembled from simple precursors
Life as we know uses energy to reproduce itself. Organisms build and break down larger molecules using a common set of reactive intermediate energy carrier molecules. These carrier molecules help chaperone the reactions which build life's biochemical complexity and help push metabolic reactions to drive cellular reproduction. New research suggests that such compounds can be made easily in the environment in the absence of biology, providing a hint as to how life may have started. (2020-10-19)

Recovery from grief is a slow, difficult process for families of terrorism victims
People who lose loved ones to terrorism are at a particularly high risk of developing Prolonged Grief Disorder, a condition characterized by severe and persistent longing for the deceased and reduced functioning in daily life. Researchers assessed grief in parents and siblings of those killed in the 2011 terrorist attacks in Norway, and found that nearly 80% of study participants experienced a high level of grief and either no sign or a slow recovery. (2020-10-14)

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