Current Recession News and Events

Current Recession News and Events, Recession News Articles.
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Increase in head start funding 'a national priority'
Increased funding for Head Start -- the largest federally funded, early childhood development program in the United States -- is needed to support families during the COVID-19 recession and to ensure a more stable economic recovery. (2020-12-07)

UTSA researchers study the effects of parental job loss on families during the pandemic
A team of UTSA researchers has discovered that economic implications because of COVID-19 can have a devastating ripple effect on children. Monica Lawson, assistant professor of psychology, Megan Piel, assistant professor of social work and Michaela Simon, psychology graduate student in the UTSA College for Health, Community and Policy, have recently published a research article on the effects of parental job loss during the COVID-19 pandemic and risk of psychological and physical abuse toward children. (2020-12-07)

Understanding declining teenage pregnancies in England
Declining rates of teenage pregnancies in England are related to local areas experiencing less youth unemployment, growing Black or South Asian teenage populations, more educational attainment, unaffordable housing, and a lack of available social housing, a recent study has found. (2020-11-10)

Meltwater lakes are accelerating glacier ice loss
Meltwater lakes that form at glacier margins cause ice to recede much further and faster compared to glaciers that terminate on land, according to a new study. But the effects of these glacial lakes are not represented in current ice loss models, warn the study authors. Therefore, estimates of recession rates and ice mass loss from lake-terminating glaciers in the coming decades are likely to be under-estimated. (2020-10-09)

Dealing with the global tsunami of mental health problems during and post COVID-19
In a special session addressing global mental health before, during and after the COVID-19 pandemic held at the ESCMID Conference on Coronavirus Disease (ECCVID) Professor Vikram Patel H(arvard Medical School, USA) will present a new review of the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on global mental health. (2020-09-25)

Land development in New Jersey continues to slow
Land development in New Jersey has slowed dramatically since the 2008 Great Recession, but it's unclear how the COVID-19 pandemic and efforts to fight societal and housing inequality will affect future trends, according to a Rutgers co-authored report. (2020-09-09)

Affordable Care Act key to keeping people insured amid COVID 19-related job losses
Widespread layoffs amid the COVID-19 pandemic threaten to cut off millions of people from their employer-sponsored health insurance plans. But the Affordable Care Act (ACA) will protect many of these people and their families from losing coverage, according to a new study. (2020-08-19)

Citizens prefer teachers and administrators to take the hit during economic crisis
With schools around the world looking into various cost-cutting measures in the midst of the COVID-10 pandemic, new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York reveals that citizens prefer teachers and administrative staff to be at the frontline of school spending cuts during times of economic crisis. (2020-08-11)

Study shows demolishing vacant houses can have positive effect on neighbor maintenance
New research out of Iowa State University suggests that demolishing abandoned houses may lead nearby property owners to better maintain their homes. (2020-08-03)

Economic and food supply chain disruptions endanger global food security
COVID-19 has led to a global economic slowdown that is affecting all four pillars of food security - availability, access, utilization, and stability. The greatest threats are to food accessibility, due to income losses and disruptions in supply chains - particularly for more nutritious foods and the world's poor. (2020-07-30)

Domestic violence increased in the great recession
Researchers found that physical abuse in adults increased substantially, with Black and Native American people being disproportionately affected. (2020-07-13)

New distance measurements bolster challenge to basic model of universe
A cosmic measurement technique independent of all others adds strong evidence pointing to a problem with the current theoretical model describing the composition and evolution of the Universe. (2020-06-11)

Government's stimulus program to boost consumer spending
The world has been experiencing an unprecedented economic downturn due to the COVID-19 pandemic. A significant number of economic activities have shut down. With increasing unemployment, economists are devising and proposing economic measures that could help ensure a sustainable increase in consumer spending and circumvent a long-term economic recession. However, whether the proposed economic measures are going to provide a long-term solution to these problems remains a concern. (2020-05-29)

Gap between rich, poor neighborhoods growing in some cities
New research provides insight into how housing prices and neighborhood values have become polarized in some urban areas, with the rich getting richer and the poor becoming poorer. The results of the study, done in Columbus, Ohio, suggest that some of the factors long thought to impact neighborhood values - such as the distance to downtown, nearby highways, or attractions such as city parks - no longer matter much to changing housing prices in an area. (2020-05-28)

High-resolution 3D view inside tumors
Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women. But individual tumors can vary significantly, presenting different spatial patterns within their mass. Researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and Helmholtz Zentrum M√ľnchen have now succeeded in visualizing spatial changes within tumors by means of optoacoustics. This method may be helpful for the future development of new drugs. (2020-05-26)

Stanford researcher envisions energy and environment landscape after COVID-19
Global carbon dioxide emissions are down dramatically in the wake of COVID-19. A new study pinpoints where energy demand has dropped the most, estimates the impact on annual emissions and points the way to a less polluted future. (2020-05-19)

Chemistry job seekers face tough outlook during pandemic
Even though it's been over a decade, the 2008 recession and its effects still loom over the chemistry enterprise. And now with the COVID-19 pandemic shutting down labs and universities across the world, chemistry students and professionals are again facing hiring freezes, reduced pay and other career obstacles. Chemical & Engineering News, the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, spoke with chemists about how they're navigating the current economic downturn. (2020-05-13)

Can we estimate the time until the next recession?
As the world economy is falling into one of the biggest contractions of the last decades, a new study of economic recession patterns finds that the likelihood of a downturn was high even before the onset of the Coronavirus crisis. (2020-05-07)

Reframing biosecurity governance as an experimental space, including as relates to handling COVID-19
Biological science and its applications are rapidly evolving, and to keep up with emerging security concerns, governance of biosecurity applications should evolve as well. (2020-04-09)

Rethinking biosecurity governance
In a Science Policy Forum, lead author Sam Weiss Evans joins more than a dozen biosecurity practitioners and analysts in calling for a new approach to biosecurity governance, grounded in experimentation. Developing an ability to rethink and test assumptions about biology, security, and society is vital to evolving biosecurity for the 21st Century. This means being systematic in governance design, periodically reassessing based on lived experience, and learning across biosecurity environments. (2020-04-09)

Movement toward gender equality has slowed in some areas, stalled in others
Women have made progress in earning college degrees as well as in pay and in occupations once largely dominated by men since 1970 -- but the pace of gains in many areas linked to professional advancement has slowed in recent decades and stalled in others, finds a new five-decade analysis. (2020-03-30)

Predicting intentional accounting misreporting
Taking a fine-tooth comb over the words in a firm's annual report, instead of the numbers, could better predict intentional misreporting, says SMU Assistant Professor Richard Crowley. (2020-03-01)

Extreme weather could bring next recession
Despite obvious market risks brought by fires, floods and other events, asset managers are slow to react. (2020-02-17)

Conservative boards more likely to dismiss CEO
Leaning left or right in the political spectrum may affect how a company's board manages CEO dismissal, finds SMU Assistant Professor David Gomulya. (2019-12-03)

Job losses during the Great Recession may be responsible for decline in US birth rates
New research published this month in the Southern Economic Journal reveals job losses during the Great Recession (2007-2009) may be partly responsible for the recent drop in U.S. birth rates. (2019-11-18)

People in counties with worse economies are more likely to die from heart disease
Communities in the United States that experienced the most economic distress in the wake of the Great Recession saw a significant increase in death rates from heart disease and strokes among middle-aged people. While the death rates remained nearly unchanged in counties with the least economic distress, areas experiencing worsening economic trends saw a sharp increase, from 122 deaths per 100,000 residents in 2010 to 127.6 deaths in 2015. (2019-11-18)

What leads citizens to vote for 'anti-establishment' parties?
An article by Danilo Serani, a researcher with the Department of Political and Social Sciences at UPF, analyses the impact of the economic crisis on the electoral preferences of European citizens. The study reveals that the electoral success of challenger parties is largely due to a lack of trust in the actors of political representation. (2019-11-12)

Will college job market continue its decade-long growth?
Despite fears about a recession, the job market is strong for college graduates -- for the 10th consecutive year, according to Michigan State University's Recruiting Trends, the largest annual survey of employers in the nation. (2019-11-05)

Analysis of Galileo's Jupiter entry probe reveals gaps in heat shield modeling
The entry probe of the Galileo mission to Jupiter entered the planet's atmosphere in 1995 in fiery fashion, generating enough heat to cause plasma reactions on its surface. The data relayed about the burning of its heat shield differed from the effects predicted in fluid dynamics models, and new work examines what might have caused such a discrepancy. Researchers report their findings from new fluid radiative dynamics models in this week's Physics of Fluids. (2019-10-15)

UMass Amherst researchers release reports on economic impacts of MGM Springfield
In two highly anticipated reports about the economic impacts of MGM Springfield, University of Massachusetts Amherst researchers found that the resort-casino's construction was felt in every corner of the Commonwealth, and its development has been part of the strengthening housing and real estate markets of Greater Springfield. (2019-09-26)

School spending cuts triggered by great recession linked to sizable learning losses for learning losses for students in hardest hit areas
Substantial school spending cuts triggered by the Great Recession were associated with sizable losses in academic achievement for students living in counties most affected by the economic downturn, according to a new study published today in AERA Open, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Educational Research Association. (2019-09-25)

Oil futures volatility and the economy
The drone strike on Saudi Arabia's oil infrastructure has highlighted the fragile and interconnected relationship between crude oil supply and the global economy, with new research bringing these economic ties into greater focus. (2019-09-20)

New method of analyzing networks reveals hidden patterns in data
A new way of measuring how relationships in a network change over time can reveal important details about the network, according to researchers at Penn State and the Korean Rural Economic Institute. For example, when applied to the world economy, the method detected the greatest amount of network change during 2008-2009, the time of the global financial crisis. (2019-09-10)

Hardship during the Great Recession linked with lasting mental health declines
People who suffered a financial, housing-related, or job-related hardship as a result of the Great Recession were more likely to show increases in symptoms of depression, anxiety, and problematic drug use, research shows. The declines in mental health that were still evident several years after the official end of the recession, but were obscured when examining trends in population-level data (e.g., the number of people overall with each mental health outcome). (2019-09-03)

Can Facebook improve your mental health?
Contrary to popular belief, using social media and the internet regularly could improve mental health among adults and help fend off serious psychological distress, such as depression and anxiety, finds a new Michigan State University study. (2019-06-26)

Record-low fertility rates linked to decline in stable manufacturing jobs
New research by University of Wisconsin-Madison sociologist Nathan Seltzer identifies a link between the long-term decline in manufacturing jobs -- accelerated during the Great Recession -- and reduced fertility rates. (2019-06-18)

Number of UK adults on low incomes who face hunger has likely almost doubled since 2004
The proportion of UK adults on low incomes who face hunger because they can't afford to buy enough to eat -- a situation known as 'food insecurity' -- has likely almost doubled in the UK since 2004, suggests an analysis of survey data published online in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health. (2019-04-30)

Inequality gap grew before the Great Recession and after, study finds
The Great Recession hit Americans across the socioeconomic spectrum, but the drivers behind these socioeconomic divides were mounting before the decline even hit, according to a paper published in PLOS ONE. (2019-04-25)

Solar panel demand causing spike in worldwide silver prices
Rising demand for solar panels is having a major effect on the worldwide price of silver, which could lead to solar panel production costs becoming far higher in the future, new research from the University of Kent has demonstrated. (2019-04-17)

Negative equity house price risk could be ended, new research confirms
The risk of house prices crashing and leaving millions of homeowners in negative equity could be removed if the financial sector adopts new models of investment for housing that are widely used in other areas of finance, according to major new research. (2019-03-27)

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