Current Recognition News and Events

Current Recognition News and Events, Recognition News Articles.
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Children cannot ignore what they hear when detecting emotions
Children determine emotion by what they hear, rather than what they see, according to new research. The first-of-its-kind study, by Durham University's Department of Psychology, looked at how children pick up on the emotions of a situation. They found that whilst adults prioritised what they see, young children showed an auditory dominance and overwhelmingly prioritised what they could hear. The researchers say their findings could benefit parents currently managing home learning and professional educators. (2021-01-26)

New advances in the detection of bias in face recognition algorithms
A team from the Computer Vision Center (CVC) and the University of Barcelona has published the results of a study that evaluates the accuracy and bias in gender and skin colour of automatic face recognition algorithms tested with real world data. Although the top solutions exceed the 99.9% of accuracy, researchers have detected some groups that show higher false positive or false negative rates. (2021-01-25)

New algorithm mimics electrosensing in fish
Weakly electric fish are specially adapted to traverse murky waters without relying on vision; instead, they sense their environment via electric fields. Researchers developed an innovative algorithm for observing objects via electrosensing that is based on the real behavior of weakly electric fish. (2021-01-14)

Accelerating AI computing to the speed of light
A University of Washington-led team has come up with a system that could help speed up AI performance and find ways to reduce its energy consumption: an optical computing core prototype that uses phase-change material. (2021-01-08)

Speech recognition changes after cochlear implant
Researchers compared changes in preoperative aided speech recognition with postoperative speech recognition among individuals who received cochlear implants. (2021-01-07)

Melatonin: finally, a supplement that actually boosts memory
Researchers at Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) showed that melatonin's metabolite AMK can enhance the formation of long-term memories in mice. Memory of objects were tested after treatment with melatonin or two of its metabolites. Older mice that normally performed poorly on the memory task showed improvements as dosage increased. The metabolite AMK was found to be the most important as melatonin failed to improve memory if it was blocked from metabolizing into AMK. (2020-12-10)

Under-recognition of symptoms may be common in breast cancer patients receiving radiation
Among patients with breast cancer treated with radiotherapy, under-recognition of symptoms was common in reports of pain, pruritus, edema, and fatigue, with younger patients and Black patients having significantly increased odds of symptom under-recognition. (2020-12-09)

Preschool children can't see the mountains for the cat
Imagine seeing an image of a cat in front of a wide scene of mountains and being told just to remember the mountains if you saw them in a later picture. As an adult, that's not hard to do. But a new study shows that, even when told to pay attention to the mountain, preschool children focus so much on the cat that they won't later recognize the same mountain. (2020-11-30)

Are we the same person throughout our lives? In essence, yes
Although our body changes and our beliefs and values may vary throughout our lives, our essence remains stable. Research at the Complutense University of Madrid (UCM) has recorded brain activity in a group of individuals showing that our ability to recognise ourselves as distinctive --the ''continuity of the self''-- remains undiminished by change and that it takes us only 250 milliseconds to recognise ourselves. (2020-11-25)

Who is the world's best super-recogniser? This test could help us find them
Psychologists are hoping the UNSW Face Test will help unearth more of Australia's top performers in facial recognition, known as super-recognisers. (2020-11-16)

Artificial intelligence in art: a simple tool or creative genius?
Intelligent algorithms are used to create paintings, write poems, and compose music. According to a study by an international team of researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), and the Center of Humans and Machines at the Max Planck Institute for Human Development, whether people perceive artificial intelligence (AI) as the ingenious creator of art or simply another tool used by artists depends on how information about AI art is presented. The results were published in the journal iScience. (2020-09-30)

Personal interactions are important drivers of STEM identity in girls
Researchers found that nuanced interactions between teachers and campers at a coding camp for middle school girls as well as among the girls themselves impacted how girls viewed themselves as coders. (2020-09-21)

Plant pathogens reorder physical structures of effectors to escape plant recognition
Phytophthora infestans is an oomycete, or water mold, that causes the devastating potato disease known as late blight or potato blight and was responsible for the famous Irish Famine of the 1840s. In a recently published study, a group of scientists focused on the effectors of that pathogen and confirmed that plant pathogens employ an array of mechanisms to escape plant immunity response. These mechanisms explain why integrated resistance in plants cannot last long. (2020-09-02)

DNA repair - Locating and severing lethal links
Covalent cross-links between proteins and DNA are among the most hazardous types of DNA damage. Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich researchers have now characterized an enzyme that breaks such bonds, and elucidated how it specifically recognizes sites of damage. (2020-08-27)

Lipid-Oligonucleotides (LONs) --- Promising materials for bioapplications
Lipid-oligonucleotides (LONs) are promising biological materials with special amphiphilic structures and unique functionalities of two moieties, contributing to different bioapplications (from biosensors to biomedicines). LONs have been employed in cellular microenvironment monitoring and mechanical forces measurements, and have shown potential in developing targeted theranostics as well as controllable nanoreactors. This review will discuss the recent progress of using LONs in various bioapplications and the remaining challenges, while leaving some suggestions for future improvement. (2020-08-20)

Using infrared eye tracking to study infant behavior
Researchers have adapted infrared technology to automate the tracking of visual tasks in infants in order to more accurately measure memory and cognitive behavior. The technique can help improve cognition studies in infants. (2020-08-14)

​NTU Singapore scientists develop artificial intelligence system for high precision recognition of hand gestures
Scientists from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) have developed an Artificial Intelligence (AI) system that recognises hand gestures by combining skin-like electronics with computer vision. (2020-08-13)

More than meets the eye
New findings reframe the traditional view of face blindness as a disorder arising strictly from deficits in visual perception of facial features. Findings suggest prosopagnosia may be a more complex disorder rooted in multiple deficits. Findings can help inform the design of tools to improve face recognition in those with the condition. (2020-07-10)

Location, location, location -- Even gut immune response is site-specific
Researchers at Würzburg University are using mini-organs to model the digestive tract in the laboratory. These so-called organoids provide insights into the inflammatory processes that play a role in diseases such Crohn's and ulcerative colitis. (2020-07-03)

It's not about money -- why academic scientists engage in commercial activities
For scientists, engaging in commercial activities such as patenting and starting new ventures can be much more lucrative than relying on pure academic work. However, according to new research by ESMT Berlin, money is not the main reason why scientists choose to work on commercial activities. Motives such as social impact seem more important. (2020-06-18)

Brainsourcing automatically identifies human preferences
Researchers at the University of Helsinki have developed a technique, using artificial intelligence, to analyse opinions and draw conclusions using the brain activity of groups of people. This technique, which the researchers call ''brainsourcing'', can be used to classify images or recommend content, something that has not been demonstrated before. (2020-06-17)

Single-cell yolk-shell capsules with high biological activity and stability
The expansion of the global market for microbes and microbial products have been increasingly demanding the full exploitation of bacteria with high activity and stability. Single-cell yolk-shell nanoencapsulation, a novel technique recently reported by a scientist team based in China and Belgium, can endow living bacteria with a hierarchical ordered porous structure, significantly enhancing biological activity and stability for various nanobiotechnological functionalisation and applications. (2020-06-08)

New study reveals areas of brain where recognition and identification occur
Using ''sub-millimeter'' brain implants, researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth), have been able to determine which parts of the brain are linked to facial and scene recognition. (2020-06-04)

How the brain recognizes change
IBS research team revealed in an animal study a previously unknown role of a presynaptic adhesion molecule to tell the new change by regulating postsynaptic NMDA-type receptor responses at excitatory synapses. (2020-04-21)

When fathers are pregnant
Reproduction is still one of the greatest mysteries in nature. Pregnancies are usually carried out by the female sex. Only in pipefishes and seahorses males are the pregnant sex. An international team of scientists led by the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel has deciphered the complex modifications of their immune system that enabled male pregnancy. The results have now been published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). (2020-04-13)

FSU research shows guppies help their brothers when it comes to the opposite se
In a new study published by a Florida State University team, researchers found that male Trinidadian guppies observe a form of nepotism when it comes to pursuing the opposite sex. These tiny tropical fish often help their brothers in the mating process by darting in front of other males to block access to a female. (2020-03-26)

'Blind over-reliance' on AI technology to manage international migration could lead to serious breaches of human rights
Over-reliance by countries on artificial intelligence to tackle international migration and manage future migration crisis could lead to serious breaches of human rights, a new study warns. (2020-03-17)

New aerial image dataset to help provide farmers with actionable insights
A dataset of large-scale aerial images produced by Intelinair, a spinout from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, aims to give farmers visibility into the conditions of their fields. The dataset, called Agriculture-Vision, will enable agricultural pattern analysis of aerial images, providing farmers with actionable insights into the performance of their crops to improve decision-making and maximize yields. (2020-03-06)

Neural hardware for image recognition in nanoseconds
Usually, artificial intelligence is based on software. Scientists at TU Wien (Vienna) created intelligent hardware, which is much faster. Within nanoseconds, the chip can analyze images and provide the correct output. (2020-03-05)

How the brain separates words from song
The perception of speech and music -- two of the most uniquely human uses of sound -- is enabled by specialized neural systems in different brain hemispheres adapted to respond differently to specific features in the acoustic structure of the song, a new study reports. (2020-02-27)

AI has helped to better understand how human brain performs face recognition
Scientists from Salk Institute (USA), Skoltech (Russia), and Riken Center for Brain Science (Japan) investigated a theoretical model of how populations of neurons in the visual cortex of the brain may recognize and process faces and their different expressions and how they are organized. (2020-02-25)

Bumblebees recognize objects through sight and touch, a complex cognitive feat
Demonstrating an unprecedented degree of cognitive complexity in an insect, researchers report that bumblebees are capable of recognizing objects across senses. (2020-02-20)

What's your brand?
Researchers created an algorithm that successfully predicted consumer purchases. The algorithm made use of data from the consumers' daily activity on social media. Brands could use this to analyze potential customers. The researchers' method combines powerful statistical modeling techniques with machine learning-based image recognition. (2020-02-05)

How employees' rankings disrupt cooperation and how managers can restore it
First prize is a Cadillac Eldorado, second prize a set of steak knives, third prize you're fired». What Alec Baldwin introduces in a famous Glengarry Glen Ross scene is a particularly crude form of performance ranking and what follows in the movie is a story of cheating and infighting as actors attempt to get ahead in the raking. In the real life, the risks with performance rankings are similar, Bocconi Professor Cassandra Chambers finds. (2020-01-27)

'Profound' evolution: Wasps learn to recognize faces
One wasp species has evolved the ability to recognize individual faces among their peers -- something that most other insects cannot do -- signaling an evolution in how they have learned to work together. (2020-01-27)

The way you dance is unique, and computers can tell it's you
Nearly everyone responds to music with movement, whether through subtle toe-tapping or an all-out boogie. A recent discovery shows that our dance style is almost always the same, regardless of the type of music, and a computer can identify the dancer with astounding accuracy. (2020-01-17)

It's not about East and West, it's about top and bottom
Overall, 93% of the German populace feels valued in their everyday lives, whereas far fewer -- but still one out two (52%) -- feel disrespected. Disrespect, however, is most commonly experienced in the workplace. East and West Germans feel equally appreciated in their everyday lives -- yet also equally disrespected. Rather, how much appreciation and disrespect a person experiences strongly depends on levels of income, education, and the employment status. (2020-01-10)

Advanced imaging tips T cell target recognition on its head
T cells represent a key component of our immune system, and play a critical role in protecting us against harmful pathogens like viruses and bacteria, and cancers. An Australian team of scientists has redefined what we thought we knew about T cell recognition for the past 20 years. (2019-12-19)

Study probing visual memory, amblyopia unveils many-layered mystery
Scientists pinpionted the role of a receptor in the plasticity underlying the degradation of vision in the common childhood condition amblyopia, but expected that receptor would play a bigger role in layer 4 of the visual cortex. (2019-12-13)

Penn Medicine uses social media-style memes and gifs to encourage staff recognition
A study found that the Penn 'High Five' system is used by the vast majority of the team where it was first launched. (2019-12-10)

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