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Current Red Blood Cells News and Events, Red Blood Cells News Articles.
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Transforming DNA repair errors into assets
A new bioinformatics tool, MHcut reveals that a natural repair system for DNA damage, microhomology-mediated end joining, is probably far more common in humans than originally assumed. (2019-10-28)
Signaling waves determine embryonic fates
Embryonic stem cells begin to self-organize when they sense interacting waves of molecular signals that help them start -- and stop -- differentiating into patterns. (2019-10-28)
Research brief: Nutritious foods have lower environmental impact than unhealthy foods
Widespread adaptation of healthier diets would markedly reduce the environmental impact of agriculture and food production. (2019-10-28)
3D-printed device finds 'needle in a haystack' cancer cells by removing the hay
Finding a handful of cancer cells hiding among billions of blood cells in a patient sample can be like finding a needle in a haystack. (2019-10-27)
Yale researchers find cells linked to leading cause of blindness in elderly
Researchers from Yale University, the Broad Institute of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Harvard University report in the Oct. (2019-10-25)
Deflating beach balls and drug delivery
Gwennou Coupier and his colleagues at Grenoble Alps University, Grenoble, France have shown that macroscopic-level models of the properties of microscopic hollow spheres agree very well with theoretical predictions. (2019-10-25)
Nerve cell protection free from side effects
The hormone erythropoietin (Epo) is a well-known doping substance that has a history of abuse in endurance sports. (2019-10-25)
Iron availability in seawater, key to explaining the amount and distribution of fish
A new paper led by ICTA-UAB researchers Eric Galbraith and Priscilla Le Mézo and published in the journal Frontiers in Marine Science proposes that the available iron supply in large areas of the ocean is insufficient for most fish, and that -- as a result -- there are fewer fish in the ocean than there would be if iron were more plentiful. (2019-10-24)
Researchers learn how Ebola virus disables the body's immune defenses
A new study by researchers from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston uncovered new information on why the Ebola virus can exert such catastrophic effects on the infected person. (2019-10-24)
Controlling the immune system's brakes to treat cancer, autoimmune disorders
Researchers at St. Jude have revealed the mechanism underlying the activation of regulatory T cells, which could spark new drug development. (2019-10-24)
Neurotransmitters in an instant
Dopamine, serotonin, adrenalin... The smooth functioning of the human brain depends on their correct proportions. (2019-10-23)
Anti-arthritis drug also stops tuberculosis bacillus from multiplying in blood stem cells
Immunologist Johan Van Weyenbergh (KU Leuven) and his Belgian-Brazilian colleagues have shown that a drug used to fight arthritis also stops the process that allows the tuberculosis bacillus to infect and hijack blood stem cells. (2019-10-23)
High-salt diet promotes cognitive impairment through the Alzheimer-linked protein tau
In the study, published Oct. 23 in Nature, the investigators sought to understand the series of events that occur between salt consumption and poor cognition and concluded that lowering salt intake and maintaining healthy blood vessels in the brain may 'stave off' dementia. (2019-10-23)
Pathogenic tau and cognitive impairment are precipitated by a high-salt diet
High levels of dietary salt can activate a pathway in the brain to cause cognitive impairment, according to a new study. (2019-10-23)
Promising therapy for common form of eczema identified in early-stage trial
A therapy that targets the immune system showed promise for treating atopic dermatitis -- the most common form of eczema -- in a small proof-of-concept trial, led by scientists from the Medical Research Council Human Immunology Unit at the University of Oxford. (2019-10-23)
Fish more tolerant than expected to low oxygen events
Fish may be more tolerant than previously thought to periods of low oxygen in the oceans, new research shows. (2019-10-22)
Study shows how circulating tumor cells target distant organs
Most cancers kill because tumor cells spread beyond the primary site to invade other organs. (2019-10-22)
3D printing, bioinks create implantable blood vessels
A biomimetic blood vessel was fabricated using a modified 3D cell printing technique and bioinks. (2019-10-22)
Loosen up!
Generally, exercise is considered good for you. However, physicians and medical doctors previously prescribed bedrest to people with heart failure, fearing exercise could potentially lead to additional health problems. (2019-10-22)
New strategy for treating high blood pressure
The key to treating blood pressure might lie in people who are 'resistant' to developing high blood pressure even when they eat high salt diets, shows new research published today in Experimental Physiology. (2019-10-22)
California's crashing kelp forest
First the sea stars wasted to nothing. Then purple urchins took over, eating and eating until the bull kelp forests were gone. (2019-10-21)
Women with anemia twice as likely to need transfusion after cesarean delivery
Pregnant women with anemia are twice as likely to need blood transfusions after a cesarean delivery, as those without the condition, according to a study being presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY® 2019 annual meeting. (2019-10-21)
Immune reaction causes malaria organ damage
Immune cells can be the body's defenders and foes at the same time (2019-10-21)
Repurposing heart drugs to target cancer cells
This study has highlighted a novel senolytic drug - drug that eliminates senescent cells -- that are currently being used to treat heart conditions that could be repurposed to target cancer cells, and a range of other conditions. (2019-10-21)
Protein in blood protects against neuronal damage after brain hemorrhage
Patients who survive a cerebral hemorrhage may suffer delayed severe brain damage caused by free hemoglobin, which comes from red blood cells and damages neurons. (2019-10-21)
A compound effective to chemotherapy-resistant cancer cells identified
A compound effective in killing chemotherapy-resistant glioblastoma-initiating cells (GICs) has been identified, raising hopes of producing drugs capable of eradicating refractory tumors with low toxicity. (2019-10-18)
UK veterinary profession simply not ready for 'no deal' Brexit
The UK veterinary profession is simply not prepared for a 'No Deal' Brexit, warns the editor of Vet Record. (2019-10-18)
Study: First evidence of immune response targeting brain cells in autism
Post-mortem analysis of brains of people with autism revealed cellular features not previously linked to autism. (2019-10-17)
When added to gene therapy, plant-based compound may enable faster, more effective treatments
Today's standard process for administering gene therapy is expensive and time-consuming--a result of the many steps required to deliver the healthy genes into the patients' blood stem cells to correct a genetic problem. (2019-10-17)
The Lancet Haematology: First global estimates suggest around 100 million more blood units are needed in countries with low supplies each year
In the first analysis to estimate the gap between global supply and demand of blood, scientists have found that many countries are critically short of blood, according to a modelling study published in The Lancet Haematology journal. (2019-10-17)
Surveying solar storms by ancient assyrian astronomers
University of Tsukuba researcher finds evidence of ancient solar magnetic storms based on cuneiform astrological records and carbon-14 dating. (2019-10-16)
RUDN University veterinarians developed a way to protect carp from the harmful effects of ammonia
Veterinarians from RUDN University have developed a way to increase the resistance of carp, the most common fish in fish farms, to the harmful effects of ammonia, which is found in almost all water bodies. (2019-10-15)
Cell family trees tracked to discover their role in tissue scarring and liver disease
Researchers have discovered that a key cell type involved in liver injury and cancer consists of two cellular families with different origins and functions. (2019-10-15)
Drug-light combo could offer control over CAR T-cell therapy
UC San Diego bioengineers are a step closer to making CAR T-cell therapy safer, more precise and easy to control. (2019-10-15)
Glowing particles in the blood may help diagnose and monitor brain cancer
A chemical that has improved surgeries for brain cancer by making tumor cells fluorescent may also help doctors safely diagnose the disease and monitor its response to treatment. (2019-10-15)
Resurrection of 50,000-year-old gene reveals how malaria jumped from gorillas to humans
For the first time, scientists have uncovered the likely series of events that led to the world's deadliest malaria parasite being able to jump from gorillas to humans. (2019-10-15)
Overcoming the blood-brain-barrier: Delivering therapeutics to the brain
For the first time, scientists have identified a simple way that can effectively transport medication into the brain - which could lead to improved treatments for neurological and neurodegenerative diseases. (2019-10-11)
Viagra shows promise for use in bone marrow transplants
Researchers at UC Santa Cruz have demonstrated a new, rapid method to obtain donor stem cells for bone marrow transplants using a combination of Viagra and a second drug called Plerixafor. (2019-10-10)
AI-based cytometer detects rare cells in blood using magnetic modulation and deep learning
Researchers at UCLA Samueli School of Engineering, led by Prof. (2019-10-10)
When blood vessels are overly permeable
In Germany alone there are around 400,000 patients who suffer from chronic inflammatory bowel diseases. (2019-10-09)
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