Current Refugees News and Events

Current Refugees News and Events, Refugees News Articles.
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Transit-oriented development causing displacement: study
Transit-oriented development--which concentrates high-density housing, commercial activities and public spaces around a rapid transit station--can both be a boon and a bane for communities, suggests a new UBC study. (2021-02-18)

Patient education program with mental health component reduces cardiovascular disease risks
People who participated in an integrated mental and physical health patient education program maintained significant improvements on seven of nine health measures six months after the program's conclusion. Study by University of Illinois social work professor Tara M. Powell and Jordan's Royal Health Awareness Society. (2021-02-11)

Apps help integration and health of migrants
A new study has found that mobile apps can play a vital role in helping immigrants integrate into new cultures, as well as provide physical and mental health benefits. (2021-01-29)

Brain tissue yields clues to causes of PTSD
A post-mortem analysis of brain tissue from people who had been diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) may help explain enduring mysteries about the disorder, such as why women are more susceptible to it and whether a dampened immune system response plays a role in dealing with stress, a team headed by Yale University researchers has found. (2020-12-21)

Satellite images confirm uneven impact of climate change
University of Copenhagen researchers have been following vegetation trends across the planet's driest areas using satellite imagery from recent decades. They have identified a troubling trend: Too little vegetation is sprouting up from rainwater in developing nations, whereas things are headed in the opposite direction in wealthier ones. As a result, the future could see food shortages and growing numbers of climate refugees. (2020-11-26)

High genomic variability predicts success in desert tortoise refugees; could inform conservation
Tortoise refugees with the highest genetic variation are far more likely to survive conservation translocation than tortoises whose genetic diversity is lower, according to a new study. (2020-11-26)

The German press disparages dissenting voices on climate change
According to research presented in an article published in the journal Media Culture & Society on 8 October by Lena von Zabern, winning alumni of the award for best master's degree final project in UPF Planetary Wellbeing, and Christopher D. Tulloch, her supervisor and researcher with the Department of Communication. (2020-11-26)

One in four older refugees are in psychological distress -- even decades after resettlement
A new study of Canadians aged 45-85, released this week in the International Journal of Social Psychiatry, found that 24% of refugees were in psychological distress compared to 13% of non-refugee immigrants and those born in Canada. (2020-11-19)

Crossing international borders can be deadly for forced migrants
Crossing international borders can be dangerous, if not deadly, for refugees and asylum seekers, who have been displaced by conflict or a humanitarian crisis. According to data from the International Organization for Migration, from January 2014 to December 2018, there were more than 16,300 forced migrant deaths. These deaths did not occur at random but occurred in clusters reflecting distinct patterns in space and time that can be addressed by humanitarian interventions, according to a Dartmouth-led research team. (2020-11-16)

Empathy exacerbates discussions about immigration
Discussions about immigration are heated, even antagonistic. But what happens when supporters and opponents undertake to show more empathy? A study carried out at the University of Geneva reveals that people who support immigration are ready and willing to adopt an empathetic approach and a wider perspective. By contrast, when opponents of immigration are asked to engage in perspective taking, they feel more competition with their ''adversary.'' (2020-10-14)

Major deficits in addressing mental health needs of asylum seekers
A new study of asylum seekers in Germany suggests that, among those with symptoms of depression, anxiety, or posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), few receive a diagnosis from the health care system, and of those diagnosed, many do not receive treatment. Amand Führer of Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Germany, and colleagues present these findings in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on October 7, 2020. (2020-10-07)

Social media postings linked to hate crimes
A new paper in the Journal of the European Economic Association, published by Oxford University Press, explores the connection between social media and hate crimes. The researchers combined methods from applied microeconomics with text analysis tools to investigate how negative rhetoric about refugees on social media may have contributed to hate crimes against refugees in Germany between 2015 and 2017. (2020-10-06)

The development of climate security discourse in Japan
This research traced discourses related to climate security in Japan to determine why so little exists in Japan and whether or not such discourse could suggest new areas for consideration to more comprehensively respond to the climate change problem. Based on categorization of various approaches by climate security-related literature outside Japan, the study revealed areas where Japan has been able to respond to, and other areas where almost no discussion is being made in Japan. (2020-10-01)

Taking in refugees does not strongly influence xenophobia in East German communities
The reception of refugees in East German communities did not lead to changes in voting behaviour or attitudes to migration. This is the main finding of a study conducted by Max Schaub (WZB), Johanna Gereke (MZES), and Delia Baldassarri (New York University). In the over 200 East German communities they examined, negative attitudes to migration were widespread. However, the arrival of refugees in the immediate neighbourhood had hardly any influence on these attitudes. (2020-09-22)

Climate change triggers migration - particularly in middle-income countries
Environmental hazards affect populations worldwide and can drive migration under specific conditions. Changes in temperature levels, increased rainfall variability, and rapid-onset disasters, such as tropical storms, are important factors as shown by a new study led by the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK). Environmental migration is most pronounced in middle-income and agricultural countries but weaker in low-income countries, where populations often lack resources needed for migration. (2020-09-14)

Why do so many refugees move after arrival? Opportunity and community
Many refugees in the United States move to a different state soon after arrival, according to a new dataset on nearly 450,000 people who were resettled between 2000 and 2014. And when they move, they are primarily looking for better job markets and helpful social networks of others from their home country -- not more generous welfare benefits. These findings counter the stereotype that refugees are destined to become a drain on state resources over the long run. (2020-08-07)

Psychologists pinpoint psychological factors of refugee integration
According to the latest UN report, the number of displaced persons and refugees has surged, again, by several millions. Most of them will not be able to return to their homes in the foreseeable future. Psychologists at Münster University have developed a model of the psychological factors affecting the successful integration of refugees. The model has been published in the journal ''Perspectives on Psychological Science''. (2020-07-09)

Desert island discs: Music listened to in younger years defines us forever, research finds
Researchers at the University of Westminster and City University of London analysing the music record choices of guests on BBC Radio 4's Desert Island Discs programme has found that the music we listen to between the age of 10 and 30 define us for the rest of our lives. (2020-07-09)

Refugee children get better health, nutrition via e-vouchers
Electronic food vouchers provided young Rohingya children in Bangladeshi refugee camps with better health and nutrition than direct food assistance, according to new research led by Cornell University, in conjunction with the International Food Policy Research Institute. (2020-06-11)

Young migrants at risk of mental illness
Experience of trauma, abuse and poverty puts the mental health of many young refugees at risk. (2020-05-11)

Study estimates cost of cancer care for Syrian refugees in wake of COVID-19
A new study shows the cost of cancer care for Syrian refugees in host nations for the first time, as researchers urge resources to be provided in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. (2020-04-30)

NHS charging rules for non-residents 'unworkable' and harming wider UK health system
The current NHS regulations for charging those not ordinarily resident in the UK for treatment, such as migrants and short term visitors, are 'unworkable' and harmful to the wider health system, concludes an analysis of survey responses, published in BMJ Paediatrics Open. (2020-04-21)

Life in refugee camps wreaks havoc on children's health
Children's health declines the longer they live in refugee camps. Many adults are also struggling, with seven out of ten feeling like they have no future. (2020-04-08)

COVID-19 in humanitarian settings and lessons learned from past epidemics
A new paper, ;COVID-19 in Humanitarian Settings and Lessons Learned from Past Epidemics' published in Nature Medicine, invokes a global response to protect the most vulnerable during the COVID-19 pandemic. (2020-04-08)

Majority in national survey against separating immigrant families at US/Mexico Border
A clear majority of participants in a national survey about the zero-tolerance policy on the United States/Mexico border strongly opposed separating immigrant families and charging the parents as criminals, according to Baylor University research. (2020-03-16)

Examining risk of violent assault among young immigrants, refugees in Canada
This population-based study describes the risk of experiencing violent assault among young immigrants and refugees (ages 10 to 24) compared with nonimmigrants in an analysis of  linked health and administrative databases in Ontario, Canada. Researchers acknowledge some important factors are unknown, including the circumstances of some events. (2020-03-04)

A PLOS Medicine special issue devoted to refugee and migrant health
This week, the open-access journal PLOS Medicine launches its latest special issue, focused on research and commentary about the health of refugees and migrants. (2020-03-03)

Asylum law in Germany: Fragmented, confusing and full of holes
The research report 'Refugee Protection in Germany' by the EU project 'Multilevel Governance of Migration (RESPOND)' paints a gloomy picture of the human rights protection for asylum seekers in Germany. Among other things, the authors speak of a 'differential exclusion' of ever larger groups from German asylum law on the basis of more or less arbitrary criteria. Professor Sabine Hess from the University of Göttingen led the research in Germany. (2020-02-17)

Families give high marks to parenting supports 'for refugees, by refugees,' study finds
A parenting program, developed by Somali and Bhutanese refugees in partnership with Boston College researchers, retained a majority of participants and showed promise reducing reports of childhood depression and family conflict and improving behavior among children, according to findings published in the Journal of Adolescent Health. (2020-01-30)

Older refugees have high levels of depression even decades after immigration to Canada
A new study of Canadians aged 45-85, released this week, found that refugees were 70% more likely to suffer from depression than those born in Canada when age, sex and marital status were taken into account -- even decades after immigration. (2020-01-23)

The Lancet Global Health: Guided self-help intervention reduces refugees' psychological distress and improves wellbeing in humanitarian crises
A guided self-help approach that provides strategies for managing distress and coping with adversity is safe, and resulted in meaningful improvements in psychological distress and functioning compared to enhanced usual care over three months in female refugees living in a settlement in Uganda, according to a randomized trial involving almost 700 South Sudanese refugee women, published in The Lancet Global Health journal. (2020-01-22)

Study highlights effectiveness of behavioral interventions in conflict-affected regions
A new study, published in The Lancet Global Health, highlights the effectiveness of behavioral intervention in reducing psychological distress in conflict-affected regions. (2020-01-22)

Psychology program for refugee children improves wellbeing
A positive psychology program created by researchers at Queen Mary University of London focuses on promoting wellbeing in refugee children. It is unusual in that it focuses on promoting positive outcomes, rather than addressing war trauma exposure. (2020-01-17)

Carnegie Mellon leverages AI to give voice to the voiceless
Refugees are often the target of hate speech on social media, but researchers at Carnegie Mellon University are now leveraging artificial intelligence to identify and highlight sympathetic and supportive social media posts. (2020-01-13)

Beyond borders: Geographers link formation of international laws to refugee crisis
West Virginia University geographers are linking the political and human rights issues at borders today to the legacies of foreign and domestic policy across the globe since World War I. (2019-11-08)

Time in host country -- a risk factor for substance abuse in migrants
Refugees and other migrants who move to Sweden are initially less likely to be diagnosed with alcohol or drug addiction than the native population but over time their rates of substance abuse begin to mirror that of the Swedish born population. That is according to a new study by researchers at UCL in the UK and Karolinska Institutet in Sweden published in the journal PLOS Medicine. (2019-11-06)

Substance use, misuse and dependence: A PLOS Medicine special issue
This week sees publication of the first research papers that will form part of PLOS Medicine's latest Special Issue, which is devoted to understanding the substantial challenges caused by substance use and misuse and seeking to inform responses in the health sector and beyond. Content for the special issue has been selected along with guest editors Margarita Alegria, Steffanie Strathdee and Alexander Tsai. (2019-11-05)

Poverty may be more critical to cognitive function than trauma in adolescent refugees
For approximately a decade, research has examined whether trauma or poverty is the most powerful influence on children's cognitive abilities. To address this question, a new study compared adolescents in Jordan -- refugees and nonrefugees -- to determine what kinds of experiences affected their executive function (the higher-order cognitive skills needed for thinking abstractly, making decisions, and carrying out complex plans). The study concluded that poverty worsened refugee youth's working memory. (2019-10-24)

Schools have critical role to play in supporting adolescents fleeing armed conflict
Education is known to be highly important for migrant children, yet relatively little is known about the diversity of associated school-based programs and their likely value in supporting the mental health of children. A scoping review was conducted of 20 school-based programs aimed at improving the mental health of adolescent forced migrants in high-income countries. Findings showed school-based interventions have great potential for preventing adverse mental health outcomes among children affected by conflict and displacement. (2019-10-24)

Inadequate humanitarian funding increases refugees' risk of chronic poverty
The US has the largest refugee resettlement program in the world, contributing to the humanitarian efforts recognized by the global community. Nw research from the University of Colorado Denver finds that factors inherent to its structure creates systemic barriers for families that increase their risk of chronic poverty and socioeconomic instability. By requiring refugees to be economically self-sufficient within eight months of arrival, the resettlement program may be preventing them from attaining that very goal. (2019-10-22)

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