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Current Rehabilitation News and Events, Rehabilitation News Articles.
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Researchers report positive results for ReWalk ReStore exosuit in stroke rehabilitation
The trial determined the safety, reliability, and feasibility of the device in this stroke population. 'We found that the ReStore provided targeted assistance for plantarflexion and dorsiflexion of the paretic ankle, improving the gait pattern,' explained Dr. Nolan, senior research scientist in the Center for Mobility and Rehabilitation Engineering Research at Kessler Foundation. 'This is an important first step toward expanding options for rehabilitative care for the millions of individuals with mobility impairments caused by ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke.' (2020-09-09)

Quality over quantity in recovering language after stroke
New Edith Cowan University (ECU) research has found that intensive therapy is not necessarily best when it comes to treating the loss of language and communication in early recovery after a stroke. (2020-09-06)

COVID-19 patients suffer long-term lung and heart damage but it can improve with time
Two studies on COVID-19 to be presented at the European Respiratory Society International Congress show that 1) coronavirus patients can suffer long-term lung and heart damage but, for many, this tends to improve over time (findings from first, prospective follow-up of COVID-19 patients); 2) the sooner COVID-19 patients started a pulmonary rehabilitation programme after coming off ventilators, the better and faster their recovery. Embargoed press conference at 11.00 hrs CEST Friday 4 September. (2020-09-06)

Long sick leave after low-grade brain tumor
One year after the diagnosis of low-grade malignant brain tumor, a University of Gothenburg study shows, just under three people in ten were in full-time employment. Another year later, the proportion remained below half. For this young patient group, returning to work is a key health factor. (2020-09-02)

Study examines the benefits of virtual stroke rehabilitation programs
While virtual medical and rehabilitation appointments seemed novel when COVID-19 first appeared, they now seem to be part of the new norm and might be paving the way to the future. A recent review paper, co-authored by Brodie Sakakibara with the Centre for Chronic Disease Prevention and Management (CCDPM) has determined that virtual appointments, in the form of telerehabilitation, also work for people recovering from a stroke. (2020-09-02)

Ensure long term support is available for COVID-19 survivors
'Ensure long term support is available for COVID-19 survivors.' Healthcare systems around the world need to develop ways of supporting people in the community who are recovering from COVID-19, say researchers. If they don't, there is a risk that people experiencing long-term symptoms will get worse and put additional strain on already-stretched health resources. (2020-08-26)

Simultaneous stimulation helped a spinal cord injury patient regain the ability to walk
At the BioMag Laboratory, the first promising results have been achieved in the application of synchronised electrical and magnetic stimulation therapy when rehabilitating a paraplegic patient and restoring his ability to walk. (2020-08-17)

An AI algorithm to help identify homeless youth at risk of substance abuse
While many programs and initiatives have been implemented to address the prevalence of substance abuse among homeless youth in the United States, they don't always include data-driven insights about environmental and psychological factors that could contribute to an individual's likelihood of developing a substance use disorder. Now, an artificial intelligence (AI) algorithm developed by researchers at Penn State could help predict susceptibility to substance use disorder among young homeless individuals, and suggest personalized rehabilitation programs for highly susceptible homeless youth. (2020-08-14)

KIST finds a strong correlation between ultrasonic stroke rehabilitation treatment and brain waves
The Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST) announced that a research team led, by Dr. Hyungmin Kim at the Center for Bionics, Biomedical Research Institute of the KIST, found a strong correlation between a ultrasonic stroke rehabilitation method for treating damaged brain and a change in delta waves, which is a type of brain waves. (2020-08-12)

Non-invasive nerve stimulation boosts learning of foreign language sounds
New research by neuroscientists at the University of Pittsburgh and UC San Francisco (UCSF) revealed that a simple, earbud-like device developed at UCSF that imperceptibly stimulates the brain could significantly improve the wearer's ability to learn the sounds of a new language. This device may have wide-ranging applications for boosting other kinds of learning as well. (2020-08-06)

COVID-19: The long road to recovery
Researchers have identified a pattern of longer-term symptoms likely to be experienced by people who were hospitalised with the COVID-19 infection. They include fatigue, breathlessness, psychological distress - including problems with concentration and memory - and a general decline in quality of life. (2020-08-06)

How rehabilitation impacts research and care of patients with cerebral palsy
Cerebral palsy (CP) is one of the most common developmental movement disorders in children. It is associated with complex healthcare needs and for some a shortened life expectancy depending on the severity of the disorder and co-existing medical conditions. In this special issue of the Journal of Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine, experts present advancements made by rehabilitation medicine in the care of patients with CP, improving quality of life and research. (2020-08-03)

Exercise and PRP promising for shoulder pain in wheelchair users with spinal cord injury
''Conservative treatments that provide alternatives to surgery are needed for wheelchair users with spinal cord injury who have recalcitrant shoulder pain. Injection of PRP (platelet-rich plasma), which may promote healing of the injured tendon, combined with a graduated home-based exercise program, is a potential option for these individuals. Based on our pilot study, a larger randomized controlled trial is warranted.'' (2020-07-29)

Putting the spring-cam back into stroke patients steps
A research group has developed a new, lightweight and motor-less device that can be easily attached to an ankle support device - otherwise known as an ankle foot orthosis (AFO). The new device will aid stroke patients in their rehabilitation, improving their walking and preventing falls. (2020-07-22)

Simple test helps to predict and prevent falls
Scientists have developed a simple clinical test that can assess the lower limb strength of patients to predict their risk of falls. The ''enhanced paper grip test'' validated by researchers from the Centre for Biomechanics and Rehabilitation Technologies (CBRT) at Staffordshire University involves pulling a small card from underneath the participant's foot while asking them to grip with their big toe (Hallux). (2020-07-20)

The five phases of pandemic care for primary care
The authors present a roadmap for necessary primary care practice transformations to care for patients and communities during the COVID-19 pandemic. (2020-07-14)

A novel therapeutic target for recovery after stroke
IBS researchers have discovered a new mechanism to explain the effects of subcortical strokes and a new possible therapeutic approach. (2020-07-07)

A data treasure for gait analysis
The St. Pölten UAS and the Austrian general accident insurance institution AUVA have made one of the biggest data records for automated gait analysis worldwide openly accessible. Researchers are free to use the data in order to improve automated gait analysis with the help of methods such as machine learning. The dataset and the accompanying description were recently published in the magazine ''Scientific Data'' of the renowned publishing house Nature. (2020-06-30)

For cardiac rehab patients, in-home portable air cleaners lower fine-particle pollutant exposure
Using an in-home portable air cleaner (PAC) can significantly reduce exposure to fine-particle air pollutants -- a major risk factor for cardiovascular events in people with pre-existing heart disease, reports a pilot study in the July issue of Journal of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation and Prevention. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer. (2020-06-30)

Tennis: Losers move their heads more often than winners
Those sudden tantrums displayed on court by former US tennis player John McEnroe are legendary - but so too are those of Nick Kyrgios, Alexander Zverev, Serena Williams and Co. And their tennis rackets certainly bear witness to that! Emotions and nonverbal movement behaviour are closely linked processes. Up till now however, there has been insufficient knowledge about the spontaneous nonverbal expressions in response to the experience of positive and negative emotions, i.e. when winning or losing a sports competition. (2020-06-29)

Experts analyze options for treating multiple sclerosis-related cognitive impairment
'Evidence suggests that cognitive rehabilitation is effective in MS-related cognitive dysfunction, and may confer long-lasting effects,' said Dr. DeLuca. 'Access to cognitive rehabilitation therapy is likely to increase as remote options for delivery become more widely accepted, such as programs for home computers and telerehabilitation services.' Exercise training also shows promise for enhancing cognitive function. 'As studies continue to evolve, clinical applications of exercise recommendations are likely to be implemented within the next ten years.' (2020-06-16)

Many children in intensive care may not be getting rehabilitation therapy, study shows
Adult patients in hospital intensive care units (ICUs) are often given rehabilitation therapy and urged to keep mobile from an early point in their hospital stays. (2020-06-11)

Health services should learn long-term lessons of earlier coronavirus outbreaks
Patients recovering from COVID-19 could suffer significant long-term effects, according to research into the experiences of people hospitalised by previous coronavirus outbreaks. (2020-06-09)

UTEP study examines COVID-19 stress, coping strategies, and well-being
Emre Umucu, Ph.D., assistant professor of rehabilitation counseling, and Beatrice Lee, an incoming rehabilitation counseling faculty member, examined the perceived stress levels and coping mechanisms related to COVID-19, and how coping affects well-being in people with self-reported chronic conditions and disabilities. (2020-05-29)

Is pulmonary rehab after hospitalization for COPD associated with better survival?
Claims data for nearly 200,000 Medicare patients were used to examine the association between starting pulmonary rehabilitation within 90 days of being hospitalized for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and survival after one year. Pulmonary rehabilitation involves exercise training and self-management education. (2020-05-12)

After a heart attack, physical activity makes you feel better
Heart attack patients who take part in a lifestyle improvement program feel better -- especially when they do additional physical activity. That's the finding of a large study presented today on ACVC Essentials 4 You, a scientific platform of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). (2020-04-24)

Spinal cord injury increases risk for mental health disorders
A new study finds adults with traumatic spinal cord injury are at an increased risk of developing mental health disorders and secondary chronic diseases compared to adults without the condition. (2020-04-21)

Neuropsychological and psychological methods are essential
Clinical neuropsychology and psychology have evolved as diagnostic and treatment-oriented disciplines necessary for individuals with neurological, psychiatric, and medical conditions. In this collection of articles in the journal NeuroRehabilitation experts highlight medical advances in neuropsychological and psychological applications in neurorehabilitation. (2020-04-08)

Successful online management of COVID-19 infection
A team of researchers in Wuhan, China have developed a multidisciplinary self-managed home quarantine method that was effective in controlling the source of COVID-19 infection and was useful in alleviating the shortage of medical resources. (2020-04-07)

Female physicians drive unfunded research on pay disparity
Physician gender pay gaps continue to persist in the US despite an impressive body of research spanning more than 25 years. While men have a larger representation within academic medical leadership, a new study publish in JAMA Open has found that women are significantly overrepresented as the authors and disseminators of physician compensation studies and this research is largely unfunded. (2020-03-26)

Poor physical health a barrier for job seekers with serious mental illness
People with serious mental illness believe their physical health problems rather than psychological health make it difficult for them to find jobs, according to a Rutgers study. (2020-03-12)

Modern women with heart disease need flexible lifestyle programs
Women with heart disease today need flexible options for lifestyle programs that fit their busy schedules. That's the finding of a study published today, International Women's Day, in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). (2020-03-07)

Heart attack patients who follow more guidelines live longer
Patients who followed more medical advice after a heart attack were more likely to survive years after their heart attack. Their prospects improved with every additional recommendation they followed, according to new research from Kaiser Permanente published in the Journal of the American Heart Association. (2020-03-05)

Study finds music therapy helps stroke patients
New research has found that music therapy sessions have a positive effect on the neurorehabilitation of acute stroke patients, as well as their mood. (2020-03-05)

NUS-led study suggests mangrove forests provide cause for conservation optimism, for now
An international team of researchers led by Associate Professor Daniel Friess and Dr Erik Yando of the National University of Singapore has found that globally, mangrove loss rates have reduced by almost an order of magnitude between the late 20th and early 21st century -- from what was previously estimated at one to three per cent per year, to about 0.3 to 0.6 per cent per year, thanks in large part to successful mangrove conservation efforts. (2020-02-25)

New study shows vision rehab treatment effective for stroke and injury related blindness
Jose Romano, Chief of the Stroke Division at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, co-authored a recently published international study that shows that visual rehabilitation is effective for patients who have suffered vision loss related to stroke or traumatic brain injury. The study titled 'Efficacy and predictors of Recovery of Function After Eye Movement Training in 296 Hemianopic Patients,' was recently published in the journal Cortex. It is the largest neuro-visual study of its kind. (2020-02-24)

Spanish modified Story Memory Technique efficacious for Mexicans with multiple sclerosis
Researchers adapted the English language Kessler Foundation modified Story Memory Technique into Spanish. 'This is an example of how cultural adaptation can extend evidence-based interventions to non-English speaking populations,' said Dr. Krch. 'The positive outcomes of this pilot study of urban-based Mexicans have important implications. While further testing is needed, we anticipate that this adaptation of the modified Story Memory Technique will be applicable to the diverse Spanish-speaking population in the US, in addition to those with Mexican heritage.' (2020-02-19)

Supervisors share effective ways to include people with disabilities in the workplace
Among the 201 7 survey's findings were processes that were effective, but underutilized by organizations, according to Dr. Phillips. ''For example, partnering with a disability organization was identified as a highly effective way to identify qualified candidates. However, only 28.5% of organizations had implemented this. Interestingly, 75% of supervisors said this would be feasible to implement.'' Other effective, but underutilized practices were auditing of hiring practices, supervisor training in accessible application and interview methods, job shadowing, onsite training, and job sharing. (2020-02-07)

Movement study could be significant in helping understand brain rehabilitation
Researchers from the University of Plymouth (UK) and Technical University of Munich (Germany) say their study could be particularly important for those working in rehabilitation and helping people to recover after neurological conditions. (2020-01-30)

Study finds association between therapy time, length of stay after hip fracture surgery
Researchers in the George Washington University Advanced Metrics Lab found that a hip fracture patient's length of stay in a rehabilitation facility has a greater impact on functional independence than therapy time per day (2020-01-27)

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