Current Relationships News and Events

Current Relationships News and Events, Relationships News Articles.
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A natural protection racket among damselfish and mysid shrimp
In nature, there are examples of animals helping one another and living in mutually beneficial relationships that have helped shape the world's landscapes and biodiversity. New research from the University of Delaware has found one of these domesticator-domesticate relationships undersea, in the waters off Belize, where damselfish provide multigenerational support/protection to mysid shrimp in exchange for a resource or service that benefits both species. (2021-02-18)

Study suggests link between DNA and marriage satisfaction in newlyweds
New study from a University of Arkansas psychologist suggests a link between DNA and traits beneficial to bonding and satisfaction in first years of marriage. (2021-02-18)

Researchers find diverse supportive partnerships among older gay men with and without HIV
Recent data reveals that gay men living with HIV report having supportive relationships with family, friends, or in informal relationships rather than with primary romantic partners, while gay men who are HIV negative report having relationships mainly with primary partners. Additionally, gay men living with HIV were more likely to report no primary or secondary supportive partnerships compared to men who are HIV negative. (2021-02-17)

Clues for improving sleep in visually impaired athletes
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba have found that approximately one-third of a group of visually impaired athletes had sleep disorders. A later wake-up time and stress regarding interpersonal relationships in competition activities were related to the rate of sleep disorders. Addressing these factors may be key in improving sleep quality in this population. (2021-02-14)

How shared partisanship leads to social media connections
MIT scholars have found that Twitter users are three times more likely to follow other Twitter accounts they are aligned with in political terms, showing how much partisan identification itself drives social groupings. (2021-02-11)

A rare observation of a vampire bat adopting an unrelated pup
The death of a vampire bat 19 days after giving birth presented scientists studying the animals in 2019 with an unexpected chance to observe a rare event: a female bat's adoption of an unrelated baby. (2021-02-10)

Baby vampire bat adopted by mom's best friend
The strong relationship formed between two female adult vampire bats may have motivated one of the bats to adopt the other's baby. (2021-02-09)

They're just not that into you: Consumer-brand relationship insights
To reap benefits from a variety of brand relationships, marketers should match their marketing communications to how close or distant consumers feel toward their brands. (2021-01-28)

Detecting ADHD with near perfect accuracy
A new study led by a University at Buffalo researcher has identified how specific communication among different brain regions, known as brain connectivity, can serve as a biomarker for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). (2021-01-27)

Women influenced coevolution of dogs and humans
A cross-cultural analysis found several factors may have played a role in building the relationship between humans and dogs, including temperature, hunting and surprisingly - gender. The analysis used ethnographic information from 144 traditional, subsistence-level societies from all over the globe. People were more likely to regard dogs as a type of person if the dogs had a special relationship with women--such as having names and being treated as family. (2021-01-25)

Preventing loneliness in children of depressed mothers may reduce adolescent suicidality
Children of mothers experiencing depressive symptoms are more at risk, as adolescents, of experiencing suicidal thoughts and attempting suicide. (2021-01-25)

Less job stress for workers at financially transparent firms
Employees feel significantly less job distress if they work at companies that are open and transparent about the firm's finances, including budgets and profits, a new study found. Researchers examining data from the U.K. found that at companies with more financial transparency, workers felt more secure in their jobs, more committed to their employers and - most significantly - said they had better relationships with their managers. (2021-01-25)

Depression in new fathers connected to relationship insecurities
Becoming a parent often brings great joy, but not always. Parenthood also entails challenges, stress and, for some people, it can trigger depression. A new study from Lund University in Sweden shows that male postnatal depression is more common in men who are insecure in their relationship with their partner. (2021-01-22)

Study says friends are most valued in cultures where they may be needed most
Researchers from Michigan State University reveal cultural and health benefits of close human relationships in a new study. (2021-01-21)

Conflict between divorced parents can lead to mental health problems in children
A study from Arizona State University's REACH Institute has found that when children are exposed to conflict between their divorced or separated parents, they experience fear of abandonment. This worry about being abandoned in response to interparental conflict was associated with future mental health problems in children, especially for children who had strong relationships with their fathers. (2021-01-12)

Family court decisions distorted by misuse of key research, say experts
Family courts are misunderstanding and misusing research around how children form close relationships with their caregivers, say an international group of experts. (2021-01-12)

Anthropogenic heat flux increases the frequency of extreme heat events
Scientists of Institute of Atmospheric Phyics at the Chinese Academy of Sciences developed a case study of Beijing, China, analyzing anthropogenic heat data based on energy consumption. They find anthropogenic heat increased the frequency and trend of the extreme heat events, while the extreme cold events were opposite. (2021-01-11)

Study resolves the position of fleas on the tree of life
A study of more than 1,400 protein-coding genes of fleas has resolved one of the longest standing mysteries in the evolution of insects, reordering their placement in the tree of life and pinpointing who their closest relatives are. (2020-12-20)

Ancient alliance
''Happy families are all alike; each unhappy family is unhappy in its own way.'' So goes the first line of Leo Tolstoy's ''Anna Karenina.'' Little did the Russian novelist know his famous opening line would one day be used to describe microbial communities, their health and their relationships to their hosts. (2020-12-09)

Career thoughts and parental relationships in adolescents with ADHD
A new study published in The Career Development Quarterly looked for potential links between negative or dysfunctional career thoughts and the quality of parental relationships in high school students with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). (2020-12-07)

No 'one-size-fits-all solution' for children exposed to domestic violence, researchers say
Researchers at Case Western Reserve University surveyed 105 agencies throughout Ohio to better understand service, policy and research needs--and get feedback about potential strategies to protect children from intimate partner violence. (2020-12-03)

Why people become defensive and how to address it
Research published in the British Journal of Social Psychology has shown that defensiveness in response to wrongdoing is exacerbated by making the wrong doer feel like they're an outcast. (2020-12-01)

Study shows strong links between music and math, reading achievement
Music educator Martin J. Bergee thought that if he could just control his study for the myriad factors that might have influenced previous ones - race, income, education, etc. -- he could disprove the notion of a link between students' musical and mathematical achievement. Nope. His new study, published in the Journal of Research in Music Education, showed statistically significant associations between the two at both the individual and the school-district levels. (2020-11-30)

Newfound ability to change baby brain activity could lead to rehabilitation for injured brains
Researchers from King's College London have identified the brain activity for the first time in a newborn baby when they are learning an association between different types of sensory experiences. Using advanced MRI scanning techniques and robotics, the researchers found that a baby's brain activity can be changed through these associations, shedding new light on the possibility of rehabilitating babies with injured brains and promoting the development of life-long skills such as speech, language and movement. (2020-11-23)

Deep learning in the emergency department
Harnessing the power of deep learning leads to better predictions of patient admissions and flow in emergency departments (2020-11-22)

Conflicts in kindergarten can reduce children's interest in reading and math
Teacher-perceived conflict predicts lower interest and pre-academic skills in math and literacy among kindergarteners, a new study from Finland shows. (2020-11-05)

Positive student-teacher relationships benefit students' long-term health, study finds
Teens who have good, supportive relationships with their teachers enjoy better health as adults, according to research published by the American Psychological Association. Perhaps surprisingly, although friendships are important to adolescents, the study did not find the same link between good peer relationships and students' health in adulthood. (2020-10-29)

Trust levels in AI predicted by people's relationship style, study shows
A University of Kansas interdisciplinary team led by relationship psychologist Omri Gillath has published a new paper in the journal Computers in Human Behavior showing people's trust in artificial intelligence (AI) is tied to their relationship or attachment style. (2020-10-29)

Land management in forest and grasslands: How much can we intensify?
Intensive land-use reduces beneficial effects of biodiversity on ecosystem services. This is the main result of a study led by the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ), the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) and the University of Bern. It assessed the effects of land management on the links between biodiversity, ecosystem functions and ecosystem services, identified thresholds of management intensity, most important species groups for driving services, and the ecosystem services at risk. (2020-10-26)

Like humans, aging wild chimpanzees value their more "positive" friendships most
Like humans, wild chimpanzees focus on fewer yet more meaningful friendships as they grow older, say researchers who studied male chimps over two decades. (2020-10-22)

How'd we get so picky about friendship late in life? Ask the chimps
When humans age, they tend to favor small circles of meaningful, already established friendships rather than seek new ones. People are also more likely to lean toward positive relationships rather than ones that bring tension or conflict. These behaviors were thought to be unique to humans but it turns out chimpanzees, one of our closest living relatives, have these traits, too. The study shows what's believed to be the first evidence of nonhuman animals actively selecting who they socialize with during aging. (2020-10-22)

Research shows aging chimps, like humans, value friendships
Chimpanzee and human friendships show many parallels, according to new research published this week in Science by associate professor Martin Muller at The University of New Mexico Anthropology department, associate professor of Anthropology and co-director of the Comparative Human and Primate Physiology Center Melissa Emery Thompson, and their colleagues. (2020-10-22)

Gender insecurity prompts women MMA fighters to date hypermasculine men
Women who compete in martial arts and combat sports challenge gender norms in their profession but often embrace them wholeheartedly and even overdo them in their personal lives, finds a UC Riverside study published in Sociology of Sport Journal. The findings underscore the need for caution when assigning a feminist label to an organization or activity simply because it features women in powerful positions. (2020-10-22)

Building blocks of language evolved 30-40 million years ago
The capacity for language is built upon our ability to understand combinations of words and the relationships between them, but the evolutionary history of this ability is little understood. Now, researchers from the University of Warwick have managed to date this capacity to at least 30-40 million years ago, the last common ancestor of monkeys, apes and humans. (2020-10-21)

Marriage or not? Rituals help dating couples decide relationship future
Rituals such as those centered around holidays and other celebrations play an important part in human relationships. When dating couples engage in rituals together, they learn more about each other. And those experiences can serve as diagnostic tools of where the relationship is going, a University of Illinois study shows. (2020-10-15)

Relationship value and economic value are evaluated by the same part of the brain
Researchers from several Japanese universities have revealed that the orbitofrontal cortex, the part of the brain responsible for calculating economic value, is also responsible for judging the value of relationships with friends based on the received commitment signals. (2020-10-12)

Same-gender couples interact better than heterosexual couples
Same-gender couples have higher-quality interactions with one another than heterosexual couples in Southern California, a new UC Riverside study finds. The study also holds that couples with two men have the smallest social networks. (2020-10-07)

Nurture trumps nature in determining severity of PTSD symptoms
Researchers at Yale and elsewhere previously identified a host of genetic risk factors that help explain why some veterans are especially susceptible to the debilitating symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). (2020-10-01)

Evolutionary and heritable axes shape our brain
Every region has its place in the brain. However, it has been unclear why brain regions are located where they are. Now, scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences have defined two main axes along which brain regions are genetically organized, stretching from posterior to anterior and inferior to superior in the brain. These axes are mainly shaped by genes and evolution. (2020-09-28)

Loneliness predicts development of type 2 diabetes
New King's College London research has shown for the first time that people over 50 who report higher levels of loneliness are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes later in life. (2020-09-15)

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