Current Religious Belief News and Events

Current Religious Belief News and Events, Religious Belief News Articles.
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Psychological 'signature' for the extremist mind uncovered by Cambridge researchers
Study investigates ideological attitudes using an unprecedented number of cognitive and personality tests, and finds that people who lean towards ''extreme pro-group action'' have a similar type of mind. (2021-02-21)

Climate change concern unaffected by pandemic, study shows
Covid-19 has not made people any less concerned about climate change - despite the pandemic disrupting and dominating many aspects of their lives, a study suggests. Over a period of 14 months - including the first three months of the Covid-19 lockdown - neither concern about climate change nor belief in the severity of the problem declined in the UK, the research found. (2021-02-18)

Mental health disorders and alcohol misuse more common in LGB people
Lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB*) people are significantly more likely to have mental health conditions and report alcohol and drug misuse than heterosexual people - according to a new study led by UCL researchers in collaboration with the University of East Anglia and City, University of London. (2021-02-16)

Which conspiracy theory do you believe in?
Everyone believes in at least one conspiracy theory, according to conspiracy researchers. Conspiracy theories aren't reserved for angry Republicans in the United States. Do you think Biden stole the election? (2021-02-11)

The wars in Former Yugoslavia continue in the classroom
According to the Education Act, schools in the ethnically divided Bosnia and Herzegovina must teach students ''democratic ideals in a multicultural society.'' But according to new research from the University of Copenhagen, the opposite happens: Segregated schools perpetuate ethnic divisions between Croats, Serbs and Bosniaks, making reconciliation after the 1992-1995 wars extremely difficult. (2021-02-09)

COVID-19 health threat increases psychological distress among Black Americans
A new University of Georgia study examines the interplay between the perceptions of coronavirus threat and psychological distress among Black Americans. (2021-02-04)

Describing the worldviews of the new 'tech elite'
The new tech elite share distinct views setting them apart from other segments of the world's elite more generally, according to a study published January 20, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Hilke Brockmann from Jacobs University Bremen, Germany, and colleagues. (2021-01-20)

Scientists shed light on how and why some people report "hearing the dead"
Spiritualist mediums might be more prone to immersive mental activities and unusual auditory experiences early in life, according to new research. (2021-01-17)

New study connects religiosity in US South Asians to cardiovascular disease
The Study on Stress, Spirituality and Health (SSSH), a cutting-edge proteomics analysis, suggests that religious beliefs modulate protein expression associated with cardiovascular disease in South Asians in the United States. (2021-01-15)

Study: Religion, psychology share methods for reducing distress
Religious people facing life crises rely on emotion-regulation strategies that psychologists also use, a new study finds. They look for positive ways of thinking about hardship, a practice known to psychologists as ''cognitive reappraisal.'' They also tend to have confidence in their ability to cope with difficulty, a trait called ''coping self-efficacy.'' Both have been shown to reduce symptoms of anxiety and depression. (2021-01-08)

New review says the ineffective 'learning styles' theory persists in education
A new review by Swansea University reveals there is widespread belief, around the world, in a teaching method that is not only ineffective but may actually be harmful to learners. For decades educators have been advised to match their teaching to the supposed 'learning styles' of students. However, a new paper by Professor Phil Newton, of Swansea University Medical School, highlights that this ineffective approach is still believed by teachers and calls for a more evidence-based approach to teacher-training. (2021-01-06)

Social media use increases belief in COVID-19 misinformation
The more people rely on social media as their main news source the more likely they are to believe misinformation about the pandemic, according to a survey analysis. The study also found that levels of worry about COVID-19 increased the strength of people's belief in that misinformation. Two factors weakened beliefs in false information: having faith in scientists and a preference for ''discussion heterogeneity,'' meaning people liked talking with others who held different beliefs. (2020-12-14)

Irrelevant information interferes with making decisions, new research reveals
According to new research from behavioral economist Ian Chadd, an assistant professor at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, irrelevant information or unavailable options often cause people to make bad choices. When both elements are present, the probability of a poor decision is even greater. Through an experiment involving 222 individual tests each consisting of more than 40 questions, Chadd's research revealed that decisions made in an environment of irrelevant information carry time, cognitive, and consequence costs. (2020-12-14)

Religious discrimination particularly high for Jews and Muslims, study shows
Although people of all faiths report growing religious discrimination during the past few years, the phenomenon is most common among Jews and Muslims, according to a new study from researchers at Rice University and West Virginia University (WVU). In addition, Jews and Muslims are much more likely to become victims of violence because of their religious beliefs. (2020-12-09)

Weak police, strong democracy: civic ritual and performative peace in contemporary Taiwan
Looking at a case study of Taiwanese police interacting with a powerful local union, the author explores ''weak policing.'' (2020-12-01)

Dogmatic people seek less information even when uncertain
People who are dogmatic about their views seek less information and make less accurate judgements as a result, even on simple matters unrelated to politics, according to a study led by UCL and Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics researchers. (2020-11-20)

Study of hope and optimism: New paper examines research in emerging fields
A new paper published by the John Templeton Foundation explores the latest scientific and philosophical research on the related but distinct virtues of hope and optimism. The 45-page white paper, written by Michael Milona, a philosophy professor at Ryerson University in Toronto, Canada, examines findings on the benefits and risks involved in both hope and optimism. It examines projects by more than 29 researchers worldwide on topics related to the effects of hope and optimism in education, faith, healthcare, politics, and more. (2020-11-19)

Xenophobia in Germany is declining, but old resentments are paired with new radicalism
Xenophobia in Germany has decreased, but right-wing extremist attitudes remain high. There is also evidence of ''radicalisation and disinhibition among those with far-right views''. These are key findings of the representative Leipzig Authoritarianism Study. Professors Oliver Decker and Elmar Brähler from the Competence Centre for Right-Wing Extremism and Democracy Research at Leipzig University presented the study results today (18 November) at the Federal Press Conference (BPK) in Berlin. (2020-11-18)

How religion can hamper economic progress
Study from Bocconi University on impact of antiscientific curricula of Catholic schools on accumulation of human capital in France during the 2nd Industrial Revolution could hold lessons on impact of religion on technological progress today. (2020-11-13)

Multiracial congregations in US have nearly tripled, Baylor University study finds
Racially diverse congregations have more than tripled in the United States over the past 20 years, and the percentage of all-white congregations has declined, according to a study by a Baylor University sociologist and two colleagues. (2020-11-11)

Lack of positivity bias can predict relapse in bipolar disorder
Relapse in people with bipolar disorder can be predicted accurately by their tendency towards having pessimistic beliefs, according to a study published today in eLife. (2020-11-10)

Explaining the religious vote for Trump
New research by Louisiana State University sociologists indicate it wasn't Christian nationalism that drove churchgoers' Trump vote in 2016. Rather, surprisingly, Christian nationalism was important among non-churchgoers. (2020-11-10)

Study: Republicans and Democrats hate the other side more than they love their own side
In the study, titled 'Political sectarianism in America,' the authors provide a broad survey of current scientific literature to interpret the current state of politics, and introduce the construct of 'political sectarianism''' to describe the bitter polarization between the Republican and Democratic parties in the US that has been on the rise since the 1990s. (2020-10-29)

CU Denver study looks into the connection between religion and equal pay
Traci Sitzmann, an Associate Professor at the University of Colorado Denver Business School, and Elizabeth Campbell, an Assistant Professor at the University of Minnesota, provide empirical evidence and an explanation into why religion perpetuates the gender wage gap. (2020-10-28)

Divide and conquer: a new formula to minimize 'mathemaphobia'
Maths - it's the subject some kids love to hate, yet despite its lack of popularity, mathematics is critical for a STEM-capable workforce and vital for Australia's current and future productivity. New research finds that boosting student confidence in maths, is pivotal to greater engagement with the subject. (2020-10-26)

Why do white Americans support both strict immigration policies and dream act?
White Americans support strict immigration policies while at the same time favor the DREAM Act that would grant legal status to some immigrants who were brought to the United States as children, a contradiction linked to racial resentment and the belief that equality already exists, according to a Rutgers-led study. (2020-10-22)

Shared religious experiences bring couples together
Couples that pray together stay together. It's a common religious saying, but a new study from the University of Georgia is giving the proverb some scientific credence. (2020-10-22)

Nobel Prize winner says scientific research has to be 'passion-driven'
Scientists cannot be expected to drop everything they're working on to turn their attention to beating COVID-19, according to the winner of the 2019 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, Professor Sir Peter Ratcliffe. He delivers the the prestigious Michel Clavel lecture to the 32nd EORTC-NCI-AACR Symposium on Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics, which is taking place online. (2020-10-22)

'Foreign disinformation' social media campaigns linked to falling vaccination rates
'Foreign disinformation' social media campaigns are linked to falling vaccination rates, reveals an international time trends analysis, published in the online journal BMJ Global Health. (2020-10-22)

Catholic OB-GYNs can face moral dilemmas in issues of family planning
A study of Catholic obstetrician-gynecologists shows that many face moral dilemmas when dealing with issues of family planning and abortion due to their religious faith, according researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. (2020-10-16)

Athletes using sport supplements are more open to doping -- study
Athletes using legal performance enhancing and medical sport supplements are more likely to dope than those using sport foods and superfoods, a new study reveals. (2020-10-08)

Study: 2016 election negatively affected mental health of Muslim college students
The 2016 presidential election was linked to considerable mental health declines among Muslim college students, with religious Muslims seeing the largest declines in mental health, according to a University of Michigan researcher. (2020-10-05)

Study shows social media policies can curb HPV vaccine misinformation
A new study led by VCU Massey Cancer Center researcher Jeanine Guidry, Ph.D., compared how HPV vaccination was portrayed on Pinterest before and after the social media platform began moderating vaccine-related content. Findings may help public health officials utilize social media to tackle potentially harmful rhetoric and disseminate trustworthy health information. (2020-10-05)

Study: Women want more info on reproductive care restrictions from religious hospitals
Researchers from the University of Chicago and the University of California, San Francisco found that women value clear information shared early from their health care providers to help them anticipate religious restrictions before their care becomes urgent. (2020-10-01)

Expert opinion: COVID-19 vaccine rollout unlikely before fall 2021
Experts working in the field of vaccine development tend to believe that an effective vaccine is not likely to be available for the general public before the fall of 2021. In a paper published this week in the Journal of General Internal Medicine, a McGill-led team published the results of a recent survey of 28 experts working in vaccinology. (2020-10-01)

Study of UK key workers shows around half who had COVID-19 symptoms probably did not have the disease
New research from Public Health England (PHE) presented at this week's ESCMID Conference on Coronavirus Disease (ECCVID) shows up to half of UK key workers from a cohort of just under 3,000 individuals recruited (including police, fire and healthcare workers) who had self-reported symptoms of COVID-19 did not test positive for antibodies to the disease. (2020-09-24)

Muslims, atheists more likely to face religious discrimination in US
A new study led by the University of Washington found that Muslims and atheists in the United States are more likely than those of Christian faiths to experience religious discrimination. Researchers focused on public schools and tested how principals responded to an individual's expression of religious belief. (2020-09-22)

Belief in conspiracy theories is a barrier to controlling spread of COVID-19
Belief in conspiracy theories about the coronavirus pandemic was inversely related to the perceived threat of the pandemic; taking of preventive actions, including wearing a face mask; and the intention to be vaccinated when there is a COVID-19 vaccine. The research is based on two-wave panel study in March and July of 840 U.S. adults. (2020-09-21)

Shift in West African wildmeat trade suggests erosion of cultural taboos
New research by the University of Kent's Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology (DICE) has demonstrated a clear fluctuation in the trade of wildmeat in and around the High Niger National Park in Guinea, West Africa. (2020-09-17)

Trump must contend with a mobilized religious left, new research finds
With the 2020 presidential election on the near horizon, Notre Dame sociologist Kraig Beyerlein discusses what he and his co-researcher learned about the political engagement of U.S. congregations -- and how that may impact results on Nov. 3. (2020-09-17)

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