Current Responsibility News and Events

Current Responsibility News and Events, Responsibility News Articles.
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A new type of university is emerging to meet the challenges of today
A new type of university is emerging, one that steps beyond the American research university model and is nimble and responsive, takes responsibility for what happens outside its walls and can scale up to meet the demands and challenges of modern society. Arizona State University President Michael Crow says they are part of the ''fifth wave'' of universities. (2021-02-09)

Popular tool for measuring child feeding practices validated by RIT researcher
A Rochester Institute of Technology researcher has validated a tool measuring adherence to a popular child feeding approach used by pediatricians, nutritionists, social workers and child psychologists to assess parents' feeding practices and prevent feeding problems. The best-practice approach, known as the Satter Division of Responsibility in Feeding, has now been rigorously tested and peer reviewed, resulting in the quantifiable tool sDOR.2-6y. (2021-02-08)

Helping consumers save more by bursting their bubble of financial responsibility
When people perceive that their past financial behaviors have fallen short of their desired standard, they start to save more to restore perceptions of financial responsibility. (2021-02-04)

Big name corporations more likely to commit fraud
Fortune 500 firms with strong growth profiles are more prone to corporate financial securities fraud than smaller, struggling companies, according to a recent study. Researchers examined more than 250 U.S. public corporations involved in fraud identified in SEC filings from 2005-2013, compared to a control sample of nonfraud firms. Trends emerged for a greater fraud risk including corporations listed in the Fortune 500, traded on the NYSE and that had strong growth imperatives. (2021-02-02)

People blame a vehicle's automated system more than its driver when accidents happen
A new study in the journal Risk Analysis found that people are more likely to blame a vehicle's automation system and its manufacturer than its human driver when a crash occurs. (2021-02-02)

Common workplace interactions can trigger suicidal thoughts for employees with mood disorders
Perceived low-grade forms of workplace mistreatment, such as avoiding eye contact or excluding a coworker from conversation, can amplify suicidal thoughts in employees with mood disorders, based on a West Virginia University study. (2021-01-14)

Saver or spender? People are not as financially responsible as they may think, study shows
According to new research from the University of Notre Dame, people think they are more financially responsible than they actually are. (2021-01-13)

Human systems management critical for businesses during COVID-19
Amsterdam, NL, December 8, 2020 - The COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted all types of organizations, leading human resources managers to reconsider their roles to support the implementation of social distancing practices, safety measures, and new ways of working. A special issue of Human Systems Management looks at the behavioral challenges posed by new ways of working and presents new models and tools to help organizations manage the transition. (2020-12-08)

Why people become defensive and how to address it
Research published in the British Journal of Social Psychology has shown that defensiveness in response to wrongdoing is exacerbated by making the wrong doer feel like they're an outcast. (2020-12-01)

Natural resources governance -- responsibilization of citizens or forcing responsibility on them?
The possibilities of citizens to participate in natural resource governance are increasing. Responsive and collaborative models of natural resource governance can open up new opportunities, but can also lead to unreasonable responsibilization, or even force responsibility on under-resourced organizations and individuals. (2020-11-30)

Simple, no-cost ways to help the public care for the commons
By fostering visitors' individual feelings of ownership of a public resource, visitors will feel more responsible for it, take better care of it, and donate more time and money for its benefit. (2020-11-20)

More Republicans follow COVID guidelines when they're told it will protect themselves
According to new research from the UBC Sauder School of Business, a different approach to public health messaging related to COVID-19 could potentially save more lives. (2020-11-02)

Professional view of vitamin D jeopardizing elderly care home residents' health
The professional perception of vitamin D as a medicine, rather than as a key nutrient, is constraining practice and jeopardising the health of elderly care home residents in England, conclude researchers in the journal BMJ Nutrition Prevention & Health. (2020-10-12)

Artificial intelligence in art: a simple tool or creative genius?
Intelligent algorithms are used to create paintings, write poems, and compose music. According to a study by an international team of researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), and the Center of Humans and Machines at the Max Planck Institute for Human Development, whether people perceive artificial intelligence (AI) as the ingenious creator of art or simply another tool used by artists depends on how information about AI art is presented. The results were published in the journal iScience. (2020-09-30)

Children hold leaders primarily responsible, not entitled
Researchers explored how young children conceptualize leadership, specifically whether they view leaders primarily as more entitled individuals or more responsible individuals, relative to non-leaders. The findings showed that they expected a leader to contribute more to a joint goal than its non-leader partner, expected a leader to withdraw an equal share from the common prize, and judged a leader more harshly than a non-leader for not adhering to these two behaviors. (2020-09-30)

Hackers targeting companies that fake corporate responsibility
A new study found some hackers aren't in it for the money; they want to expose firms that engage in phony philanthropy. These hackers -- which include everyone from disgruntled employees to hacktivist groups -- can ''sniff out'' actions that only give the appearance of corporate social responsibility. (2020-09-30)

People with obesity in the UK wait much longer before discussing weight with a healthcare provider
A detailed analysis of UK data from a global obesity study (the ACTION-IO study) has shown that, on average, people with obesity (PwO) in the UK were struggling with their weight for 9 years before they sought help from a healthcare professional/HCP, much longer than the global average of 6 years found in this study. (2020-09-03)

The effect of military training on the sense of agency and outcome processing
A collaborative study between researchers from the Université libre de Bruxelles (Belgium), the Royal Military Academy of Belgium , found that working in a highly hierarchical environment such as the military is detrimental for the sense of agency and for the neural processing of outcomes of one's own actions. Yet, groups undergoing specific training targeting responsibility and accountability, such as military officers, did not show this effect. This research opens up the interesting possibility of training people to develop a sense of responsibility (2020-09-01)

Media's pivotal pandemic power
The mass media's coverage of the pandemic health crisis carries an important responsibility to offer balanced messaging about COVID-19 and public behaviour, Flinders University public health researchers says. While freely available, trustworthy news is vital - in particular when conveying personal risk and government mandated guidelines - the Flinders University research warns of less favourable issues such as inciting panic or causing stigmatisation in the community by laying blame on certain groups or organisations. (2020-08-23)

Is gender equality achievable in the Russian family?
Distribution of rights and obligations in the family, opportunities and responsibilities in performing the main family functions is one of the most controversial, but at the same time one of the most important issues in the modern context. Scientists from the Department of General Sociology and Social Work of the Faculty of Social Sciences at Lobachevsky University have been engaged in research on parenthood and the distribution of parental functions for many years. (2020-07-10)

Study: Interplay of impact, moral goals influences charitable giving to different causes
With the rise of globalization, geographic borders are becoming less relevant for making charitable donations, which means nonprofits and charities can make more effective pitches to donors by emphasizing higher-level concepts such as morality and idealistic values, said Carlos Torelli, a professor of business administration and the James F. Towey Faculty Fellow at Illinois. (2020-07-07)

Coronavirus pandemic in Germany: Medical care in an adaptive healthcare system
The German National Academy of Sciences Leopoldina has issued a fourth ad-hoc-statement on the coronavirus pandemic. It is dedicated to the topic: 'Medical Care and Patient-Oriented Research in an Adaptive Healthcare System'. The paper focuses on short- and medium-term aspects of medical and care services under the conditions of a sustained pandemic and identifies long-term measures that lead to a more resilient and adaptive healthcare system. (2020-05-31)

Firms perceived to fake social responsibility become targets for hackers, study shows
What corporate leaders may not realize is that strides they are making toward social responsibility may be placing a proverbial target on their backs -- if their efforts appear to be disingenuous, according to new research from the University of Notre Dame. (2020-05-05)

Alcoholics anonymous method can mesh well with other treatments for alcohol misuse
Most treatment providers for individuals with alcohol use disorders are well versed in either the 12-Step Alcoholics Anonymous program or in a different treatment such as cognitive behavioral therapy -- but the two approaches can mesh well, according to a Baylor University researcher. (2020-04-28)

Stress in parents of children with autism: Pets may help
While current events have increased stress for all families, parents of children with autism report higher levels of stress on average than parents of typically developing kids. Feeling overwhelmed and overburdened by various responsibilities, some parents turn to pets as a source of comfort and support. (2020-04-27)

A history of cannabis dependence associated with many negative mental health outcomes
More than 1% of Canadians have been dependent on cannabis at some point in their lives. Despite the fact that marijuana use is expected to grow with the recent legalization of recreational cannabis in Canada, little research has focused on factors associated with recovery from addiction. (2020-04-22)

Vermont has conserved one third of the land needed for an ecologically functional future
In a new study, forest conservation experts at the University of Vermont (UVM) confirmed that the state has already protected 33%, or 1.3 million acres, of highest priority targeted lands needed to protect and connect valuable wildlife habitats and corridors. (2020-04-01)

AI as mediator: 'Smart' replies help humans communicate during pandemic
Daily life during a pandemic means social distancing and finding new ways to remotely connect with friends, family and co-workers. And as we communicate online and by text, artificial intelligence could play a role in keeping our conversations on track, according to new Cornell University research. (2020-03-31)

Interactive product labels require new regulations, study warns
Artificial intelligence will be increasingly used on labels on food and other products in the future to make them interactive, and regulations should be reformed now so they take account of new innovations, a study warns. (2020-03-26)

From climate change awareness to action
Awareness of climate change and its impacts is not enough to move people to action. New research on how people's worldviews affect their perceptions and actions could help policymakers and activists reframe the discussion around climate change mitigation. (2020-03-09)

Primary care patients assess econsult model for provider-to-specialist consultations
A study across five academic medical centers examined the reaction of patients to the use of an electronic consultation (eConsult) service for primary care provider-to-specialist consultation. (2020-02-18)

French unions played key role in protecting workers' mental health
Virginia Doellgast, associate professor of comparative employment relations in Cornell University's ILR School, examines the role unions played in the aftermath of those deaths. Her paper, ''After the Social Crisis: The Transformation of Employment Relations at France Telecom,'' was published Feb. 11 in Socio-Economic Review. (2020-02-12)

Advisers not enough to guarantee a strong retirement
Rui Yao, a nationally recognized expert on retirement savings from the University of Missouri, suggests that employees can't trust that the retirement plan sponsored by their employer is in good hands just because the plan uses an adviser. To ensure a strong retirement plan performance, consumers must be active participants in retirement planning, she says. (2020-01-15)

Study: 'Value instantiation' key to luxury brands' and social responsibility
Although luxury brands and social responsibility seem fundamentally inconsistent with each other, the two entities can coexist in the mind of the consumer, provided the brand can find someone -- typically, a celebrity -- who successfully embodies the two conflicting value sets, says new research co-written by Carlos Torelli, a professor of business administration and James F. Towey Faculty Fellow at Illinois. (2020-01-13)

Study: US presidents play surprising role in driving corporate social responsibility
A president's political party plays a big role in corporate social responsibility efforts, reveals new research from San Francisco State's Lam Family College of Business. (2020-01-03)

Spirituality affects the behavior of mortgagers
According to Olga Miroshnichenko, a Sc.D in Economics, and a Professor at the Department of Economics and Finance, Tyumen State University, morals affect the thinking of mortgage payers and help them avoid past due payments. The study was presented at the 3rd All-Russia Research and Practice Conference 'Financial and Legal Aspects of Socially-Oriented Investments' in Ural State University of Economics, Ekaterinburg. (2019-11-29)

Use of locum doctors rising despite limited evidence on quality and safety
There is little hard evidence to support the widely held perception that locum doctors present a greater risk of causing harm to patients, according to new research published by the Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. (2019-11-11)

Examination of conscience on the role of engineering in sustainable development
In a study conducted by 3 engineers, Josep Maria Basart (UAB), Mireia Farrús (UPF) and Montse Serra (UOC) presented in an article published in September in the journal IEEE Technology and Society Magazine. (2019-10-29)

Public blame accidents on drivers more than their automated cars when both make mistakes
The public are more likely to blame accidents involving semi-autonomous cars on driver -- rather than machine -- error, a new study has found. (2019-10-28)

Darn you, R2! When can we blame robots?
A recent study finds that people are likely to blame robots for workplace accidents, but only if they believe the robots are autonomous. (2019-10-17)

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