Current Resuscitation News and Events

Current Resuscitation News and Events, Resuscitation News Articles.
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Understanding heart disease, stroke in women remains a scientific research priority
The February 2021 issue of Circulation, published online today, features new clinical trial research, state of the art reviews and scientific perspectives exploring the unique challenges women face in their fight against heart disease and stroke. The journal received more than 100 manuscripts for consideration this year, the most ever in the five years the current editorial board has published a special Go Red for Women issue. (2021-02-16)

TV and film 'thump' is not effective alternative to CPR, Warwick researchers demonstrate
A technique frequently portrayed in dramatic resuscitation scenes in television and film is among several alternative methods to CPR that have shown no benefit in saving lives in a review by University of Warwick researchers. (2021-02-15)

Raised mortality from cardiac arrest in people with COVID-19
Sudden cardiac arrest is more often fatal in people with COVID-19, a new study shows. Those responsible for the research see the results as a wake-up call for the public and care providers alike. (2021-02-05)

Guidelines for extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation in children and adults: New ELSO statements in ASAIO Journal
Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR) is a potentially lifesaving treatment for patients in cardiac arrest when the circulation can't be restored by conventional CPR. New guidelines for ECPR in adults and children, developed by the Extracorporeal Life Support Organization (ELSO), are presented by the ASAIO Journal, official journal of the American Society for Artificial Internal Organs. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer. (2021-02-01)

Simulation helps refine pediatric care guidelines for COVID-19
DALLAS - Jan. 28, 2021 - Simulation can be a viable way to quickly evaluate and refine new medical guidelines and educate hospital staff in new procedures, a recent study from UT Southwestern's Department of Pediatrics shows. The findings, published recently in the journal Pediatric Quality and Safety and originally shaped around new COVID-19-related pediatric resuscitation procedures at UTSW and Children's Health, could eventually be used to help implement other types of guidelines at medical centers nationwide. (2021-01-28)

Breakthrough in understanding 'tummy bug' bacteria
Scientists have discovered how bacteria commonly responsible for seafood-related stomach upsets can go dormant and then ''wake up''. (2021-01-20)

Many junior doctors feel out of their depth with the end-of-life decisions faced during COVID-19 pandemic
In normal times, end-of-life care discussions are most commonly led by senior doctors. However, new research from a busy London hospital shows that the high numbers of deaths taking place in hospitals during the COVID-19 pandemic, frequently out-of-hours, is leading to junior (foundation level) doctors having to lead on these difficult discussions with families, often with no formal experience or training. (2021-01-20)

Socioeconomic background linked to survival after having a cardiac arrest in hospital
Hospital in-patients from lower socioeconomic backgrounds are less likely to receive prompt cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) after their hearts stop beating and less likely to survive than patients from higher socioeconomic backgrounds. These are the findings of a new study in over 24,000 patients in Sweden, published in the European Heart Journal. (2020-12-20)

When absolute certainty may not be possible: Criteria to determine death by mountain rescue teams
The International Commission for Mountain Emergency Medicine (ICAR MedCom) convened an expert medical panel to develop evidence-based criteria that allow for accurate determination of death in mountain rescue situations. These recommendations appear in Wilderness & Environmental Medicine, published by Elsevier. (2020-12-14)

Study shows women less likely to survive out-of-hospital cardiac arrest than men
DALLAS - Dec. 15, 2020 - A study of patients resuscitated from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest shows that women have a lower likelihood of survival compared with men and are less likely to receive procedures commonly administered following cardiac arrest. (2020-12-14)

Time to lower body temperature is critical in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest
Time to reach the target body temperature was a significant factor in achieving favorable neurological outcomes in patients with witnessed out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Significantly more favorable neurological outcomes occurred if the time to target temperature management was <600 min or less. (2020-12-09)

COVID-19 can impact young children's hearts
A 2-month-old infant diagnosed with COVID-19 experienced reversible myocardial injury and heart failure, similar to COVID-19 related heart issues seen in adults, according to a case published in JACC: Case Reports. The infant recovered with normal heart function and was discharged with no heart failure medications. (2020-12-02)

Closing the racial disparity gap in survival after in-hospital cardiac arrest
In-hospital cardiac arrests (IHCA) represent catastrophic and often terminal events. Despite investments to improve the quality of resuscitation efforts, fewer than 25% of all patients that experience cardiac arrests in hospitals survive to discharge, and survival varies significantly across hospitals and by race. Until now, few have been able to specify reasons for the between-hospital differences. (2020-11-24)

COVID-19 patients survive in-hospital cardiac arrest at pre-pandemic rates
Resuscitation and survival rates of hospitalized COVID-19 patients who've had cardiac arrest are much higher than earlier reports of near-zero; variation at the individual hospital level may have affected overall numbers (2020-11-20)

Minnesota cardiac arrest resuscitation treatment demonstrated 100% success rate in cannulation
University of Minnesota Minnesota Mobile Resuscitation Consortium proves high survival rates in a peer-reviewed study. (2020-11-13)

New medication to treat shock caused by blood or fluid loss found safe and effective
Hypovolemic shock, caused by severe loss of blood or body fluids, can be deadly if not treated promptly. Centhaquine is a new medication for the treatment of hypovolemic shock that increases blood flow to the heart and organs to prevent organ failure and death. It is still in clinical trials in the U.S. Results from a small, randomized, placebo-controlled trial in India found that centhaquine significantly improved blood pressure, blood lactate levels and reduced death rate when added to standard treatment. (2020-11-09)

Machine learning helps predict survival rates of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest
Machine learning predictions about the survival rate of an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest were more accurate when neighborhood-level factors were added to the data analysis. Future research can use this newly developed model to identify neighborhood-level intervention methods to decrease death rates from an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. (2020-11-09)

Acute exposure to higher ozone levels linked to higher risk of cardiac arrest
Analysis of data from 187,000 patients found that higher ozone levels were associated with a higher risk of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. These findings may have important public health implications for recommendations on ozone regulations from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. (2020-11-09)

Serious disparities in care and outcomes found among Black and non-white heart patients
Adults who are Black or from other underrepresented racial/ethnic groups received up to 10% fewer early treatments for heart problems compared to white patients. When compared to whites, Black patients had longer hospital stays and fewer discharges to home. Hispanics, Asians, Pacific Islanders and Native Americans all had higher in-hospital death rates than white patients. (2020-11-09)

Extra precautions during CPR due to the pandemic do not have a negative impact on survival
A U.S. medical center compared outcomes of patients in 2019 and 2020 who had in-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) to determine if safety precautions due to the pandemic affect patient survival. Researchers analyzed results of COVID-19 patients who had experienced in-hospital CPR and compared them to patients without COVID-19 who had experienced in-hospital CPR and found no significant difference in patient outcomes between the groups. (2020-11-09)

Updated CPR guidelines tackle health disparities management of opioid-related emergencies and physical, emotional recovery
Updated CPR guidelines address health disparities and the management of opioid-related emergencies as well; early bystander and AED intervention remains key to survival. The Chain of Survival has been expanded to include a recovery link, which emphasizes physical, social, and emotional needs of patients and their caregivers after survivors leave the hospital. CPR training to now include guidance on responding to victims of suspected opioid overdose. (2020-10-21)

Cardiac arrest is common in critically ill patients with COVID-19
Cardiac arrest is common in critically ill patients with covid-19 and is associated with poor survival, particularly among patients aged 80 or older, finds a study published by The BMJ today. (2020-09-30)

Cardiac arrest, poor survival rates common in sickest patients with COVID-19
Study shows critically ill patients with the novel coronavirus have high rates of cardiac arrest and poor outcomes even after CPR, an effect most strongly seen in older patients. (2020-09-30)

Interventions improve bystander CPR, increase out-of-hospital cardiac arrest survival
Study by researchers at Duke-NUS Medical School, Duke University and SingHealth finds that dispatch-assisted CPR, training in CPR and use of an Automated External Defibrillator, and a volunteer first responder mobile app, increased the likelihood of laypeople performing CPR during out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, which was associated with increased survival rates. (2020-09-02)

Deep chest compressions prevent brain damage during cardiac arrest
Deep chest compressions can crack ribs, but they reduce brain damage during cardiac arrest, reports a study presented today at ESC Congress 2020. Study author Dr. Irene Marco Clement of University Hospital La Paz, Madrid, Spain said: ''Deep chest compressions improve blood flow to the brain, improving survival and brain function.'' (2020-08-24)

CPR choices of dialysis patients suggest many lack context
Globally some 2 million people with failed kidneys undergo hemodialysis treatment. Researchers queried 876 dialysis patients about whether, in the event of a cardiac arrest, they would want to be resuscitated. Nearly 85% said they definitely or probably would want CPR. The study's lead author said the findings raise concern that many patients are unaware that their likely outcomes of cardiac arrest, even with resuscitation, are poor, relative to the general population. (2020-08-24)

New CT scanning method may improve heart massage
As part of an international collaboration, researchers from Aarhus University, Denmark, and University of Leicester, UK, have succeeded in developing a dynamic 3D CT scanning method that shows what happens inside the body during simulated heart massage. The method could help to increase the chance of surviving a cardiac arrest. (2020-08-06)

No evidence blanket 'do-not-resuscitate' orders for COVID-19 patients are necessary
It's inappropriate to consider blanket do-not-resuscitate orders for COVID-19 patients because adequate data is not yet available on US survival rates for in-hospital resuscitation of COVID-19 patients and data from China may not relate to US patients, according to a new article published today in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, an American Heart Association journal. (2020-05-22)

Unplanned extubations in preterm infants leads to poor outcomes, increased care costs
Unplanned extubations in adult and pediatric populations have long been associated with poor clinical outcomes and increased costs to health care systems. (2020-05-06)

Covid-19 deaths in Italian hospitals are today increasing at maximum rate and significant numbers will continue to die until at least mid-April
A new report on Covid-19 data up to March 30 from Italy, prepared by an Italian expert for the European Society of Anaesthesiology (ESA), says that the number of daily deaths in Italian hospitals is today still accelerating at the maximum rate, and significant numbers of deaths in hospital are likely to continue until at least mid-April and could go on until early June. (2020-03-31)

Intravenous sodium nitrite ineffective for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest
Among patients who had an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, intravenous sodium nitrite given by paramedics during resuscitation did not significantly improve their chances of being admitted to or discharged from the hospital alive, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's Annual Scientific Session Together with World Congress of Cardiology (ACC.20/WCC). (2020-03-30)

Study shows key factors for reducing brain damage from cardiac arrest
Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR) can improve blood flow to the brain after cardiac arrest and preserve neurological function. However, factors predicting who benefits from ECPR are unclear. In a multicenter clinical study, called CRITICAL and led by Osaka University, researchers found that shorter time between standard CPR and ECPR, as well as responsiveness to defibrillation, are associated with improved neurological outcomes. The findings may help improve international guidelines on resuscitation following cardiac arrest. (2020-03-24)

Most mass shootings occur closest to hospitals without verification to treat trauma
In an analysis of 2019 mass shootings and hospital locations, researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) found that the closest hospital to more than 70% of mass shootings was a non-trauma center, where sudden, high casualty loads were more likely to overwhelm capacity and trauma-specific care options may have been limited. They also found that in more than half of mass shooting events, the nearest pediatric trauma center was more than 10 miles away. (2020-03-18)

First-ever analysis of video recorded CPR improves resuscitation outcomes in emergency departments
Feinstein Institutes for Medical Research and North Shore University Hospital pioneer video recording and review process to improve live-saving CPR process. (2020-03-09)

Sphingotec's endothelial function biomarker bio-ADMĀ® improves risk stratification of sepsis patients at ICUs
New study data show that monitoring blood levels of sphingotec's endothelial function biomarker bio-ADMĀ® on top of guideline parameter lactate improves risk stratification of sepsis patients admitted to intensive care units. (2020-03-05)

Sudden cardiac death often a woman's first sign of heart disease
New research from the Center for Cardiac Arrest Prevention at the Smidt Heart Institute at Cedars-Sinai shows that rates of sudden cardiac arrest are rising following decades of a downward trend. While this disturbing uptick was observed in both sexes, in women the increase was mostly among those whose sudden cardiac arrest was the first manifestation of heart disease. In men, the increase was mostly among those with known heart disease. (2020-02-17)

Getting to the heart of epinephrine use in pediatric cardiac arrest patients
The effectiveness of epinephrine treatment during resuscitation of adult patients with cardiac arrest is generally promising, but little is known about its effects in pediatric patients. Researchers led by Osaka University have shown that prehospital administration of epinephrine in children who suffer out of hospital cardiac arrest significantly improves the return of spontaneous circulation, which may enhance their survival and the likelihood of a favorable neurological outcome. (2020-01-14)

Hospital critical care resuscitation unit improves patients' chances of survival
Patients with acutely life-threatening health conditions who were treated in the innovative Critical Care Resuscitation Unit (CCRU) received faster treatment and had better health outcomes, including a 36 percent lower risk of dying than those who were transferred from a hospital's emergency department then evaluated and treated in a traditional intensive care unit, according to a recent study in the Journal of Emergency Medicine conducted by researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. (2020-01-13)

How do outcomes for in-hospital cardiac arrest differ in patients treated with dialysis?
Among patients who experience cardiac arrest while in the hospital, those on dialysis were less likely to have a shockable rhythm and more likely to be outside of the intensive care unit at the time of arrest compared with patients not on dialysis. Patients on dialysis had lower scores for resuscitation quality. Patients on dialysis had a similar likelihood of surviving to hospital discharge, and they had better neurological function at the time of discharge. (2020-01-07)

Bystander CPR less likely for people living in Hispanic neighborhoods
People living in predominately Hispanic neighborhoods are less likely to receive CPR from a bystander following an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest compared to people living in non-Hispanic neighborhoods, researchers from Penn Medicine and the Duke University of School of Medicine reported in the journal Circulation. This same group also had a lower likelihood of survival. (2020-01-02)

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