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Current Resuscitation News and Events, Resuscitation News Articles.
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Rise in serious harm to children caused by powerful painkillers, says study
The proportion of high-strength painkiller poisonings among children which result in emergency hospital admissions has increased, according to research published in the peer-reviewed journal Clinical Toxicology. (2019-12-20)

Ontario physicians do not need consent to withhold CPR that they feel will not benefit patients
In August, the Ontario Superior Court of Justice dismissed a malpractice lawsuit filed against two physicians who refused to provide cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) to an 88-year-old man with multiple comorbidities and multiorgan failure. This ruling may have important implications for physicians in Ontario and elsewhere, according to a commentary published in this week's CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2019-11-25)

Randomized trial at music festival shows potential of virtual reality for CPR training
Cardiologists at Radboud university medical center performed a research project during a large music festival called Lowlands, in the Netherlands in August 2019. The first results of this innovative study are already published in JAMA Cardiology on Sunday November 17. (2019-11-17)

Innovations in treatment of traumatic injuries with severe bleeding are saving lives
Deaths from severe bleeding after major trauma have been reduced by 40% over the last decade through a programme of research and innovation led by Queen Mary University of London, Barts Health NHS Trust and NHS Blood and Transplant. (2019-11-12)

Opioid-related cardiac arrest patients differ from other cardiac arrests
People who suffer cardiac arrest due to an opioid overdose are younger, have fewer chronic medical conditions and may be more likely to be to receive bystander CPR, according to a review of emergency response records in Maine. Yet they may be more likely than others to survive long enough to be admitted to the hospital. (2019-11-11)

Legal risk of not performing CPR higher than providing lifesaving assistance
While some bystanders may fail to attempt CPR because they fear legal liability, the likelihood of facing litigation is higher for delaying or failing to intervene, according to preliminary research to be presented at the American Heart Association's Resuscitation Science Symposium 2019 -- Nov. 16-17 in Philadelphia. (2019-11-11)

Weekend sudden cardiac arrests are more deadly
People who experience cardiac arrests over the weekend are less likely to survive long enough to be admitted to a hospital, compared to those who had the same medical event on a weekday, according to preliminary research to be presented at the American Heart Association's Resuscitation Science Symposium 2019 -- Nov. 16-17 in Philadelphia. (2019-11-11)

Citizen responder CPR and defibrillation programs may improve survival and outcomes from cardiac arrests that occur at home
Implementing citizen responder programs to answer calls for out-of-hospital cardiac arrests may increase bystander defibrillation in private homes, according to preliminary research to be presented at the American Heart Association's Resuscitation Science Symposium 2019 -- Nov. 16-17 in Philadelphia. (2019-11-11)

NIH funding for cardiac arrest research low compared to funding for other leading causes of death, disability
The National Institutes of Health (NIH) invests less money in cardiac arrest research compared to other leading causes of death and disability in the United States, according to preliminary research to be presented at the American Heart Association's Resuscitation Science Symposium 2019 -- Nov. 16-17 in Philadelphia. (2019-11-11)

Study identifies challenges to neonatal resuscitation outside of hospitals
With about 62,000 babies born outside of hospitals each year, and 1 in 10 newborns needing help to start breathing, emergency medical services (EMS) responders must be ready to give expert newborn resuscitation care. However, new research being presented at the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) 2019 National Conference & Exhibition found many responders lack recent training in resuscitation techniques for infants and experience in caring for newborns. (2019-10-25)

Use of emergency CPR device rising despite lack of evidence
While its use is expanding, mechanical CPR has not been tested for effectiveness by the Federal Drug Administration (FDA). (2019-10-25)

University of Minnesota researchers find new ways to improve CPR
An international research consortium, which included faculty members from the University of Minnesota Medical School, was able to identify what is likely an optimal combination of chest compression frequency and depth when performing CPR. (2019-09-18)

How sepsis care program saves lives and reduces costs
A sepsis care quality improvement program saves lives, shortens hospital stays and reduces healthcare costs, according to a study by researchers at Loyola Medicine and Loyola University Chicago. (2019-09-04)

Decline in sports-related sudden cardiac death linked with rise in bystander resuscitation
Fewer sports-related sudden cardiac arrest victims die nowadays, a trend linked with increased bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), reports a study presented today at ESC Congress 2019 together with the World Congress of Cardiology.(1) The late breaking study also found that the incidence of sudden cardiac arrest during sports has not changed over the last decade. (2019-09-02)

Selective coronary angiography following cardiac arrest
In the current issue of Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications volume 4, issue 2, pp. 85-98 ; DOI https://doi.org/10.15212/CVIA.2017.0060, Jayasheel O. Eshcol and Adnan K. Chhatriwalla from Saint Luke's Hospital Mid America Heart Institute, and University of Missouri-Kansas City, School of Medicine, Kansas City, MO, USA consider selective coronary angiography following cardiac arrest. (2019-08-15)

Sudden cardiac arrest in athletes: Prevention and management
It's marathon season, and every so often a news report will focus on an athlete who has collapsed from sudden cardiac arrest. Although uncommon, these events get attention. A new review in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) looks at recent evidence to help physicians prevent and manage the risk of sudden cardiac arrest in competitive athletes. (2019-07-15)

Scientific statement on predicting survival for cardiac arrest survivors
If a loved one has a heart attack that stops the heart, ends up in a coma, and the treating physician approaches you about taking the person off life support, would you trust that the physician knows when to make the call or how to judge that the person won't recover? It turns out that the science is rather shaky on when to decide the likelihood of recovery from a coma after the heart stops. (2019-07-11)

Cardiac arrest among hospitalized patients may be underestimated
More patients may be having cardiac arrests in the hospital than previously believed. The health burden of in-hospital adult cardiac arrest is about 38% greater than earlier reports and 18% greater for children, according to one study. (2019-07-09)

Rescuers often driven by emotion
Scientists from James Cook University and Royal Life Saving Society -- Australia have found reason can go out the window when people's family members, children and pets are in trouble in the water, and people should be better trained in water rescue skills. (2019-06-11)

New evidence questions use of saline fluids to resuscitate children with sepsis
Doctors have urged hospitals around the world to reconsider the type of fluids used to treat children gravely ill with sepsis. (2019-06-10)

High body fat (but not BMI itself) linked to four-fold increase in mortality risk after heart bypass surgery
New research presented at this year's Euroanaesthesia congress in Vienna, Austria (June 1-3, 2019) shows that mortality in patients who had undergone heart bypass surgery was over 4 times higher in individuals with a high body fat mass, while body mass index (BMI) by itself was not associated with an increase in mortality. (2019-06-02)

Wrong side surgical errors substantially underreported and totally preventable
Performing a procedure on the wrong side of a patient's body, although rare, may be more common than generally thought. More than 80 wrong side error (WSE) incidents were reported across 100 hospitals in Spain over the past decade, according to new research being presented at this year's Euroanaesthesia Congress (the annual meeting of the European Society of Anaesthesiology) in Vienna, Austria (June 1-3). (2019-05-31)

Avalanche Victims: When can rewarming lead to survival?
It is difficult for doctors to accurately assess avalanche victims who arrive at hospital suffering cardiac arrest: has the patient effectively suffocated, or is there a realistic prospect of survival if the patient is properly rewarmed? The correct initial assessment is crucial: it ensures that patients with a viable chance of survival are properly rewarmed, while also preventing unnecessary medical intervention in cases where survival is not possible. (2019-05-28)

Women are less likely to be resuscitated and survive a cardiac arrest than men
Women who have a cardiac arrest outside the hospital setting are less likely to receive resuscitation from bystanders and more likely to die than men, according to new research published in the European Heart Journal. Researchers looked at data from nearly 6,000 people who had resuscitation attempts between 2006 and 2012 and found that women were less likely to receive resuscitation attempts from bystanders and less likely to survive a cardiac arrest than men. (2019-05-21)

Pig experiment raises ethical questions around brain damage
The brain is more resilient than previously thought. In a groundbreaking experiment published in this week's issue of Nature, neuroscientists created an artificial circulation system that successfully restored some functions and structures in pig brains. The result challenges the notion that mammalian brains are fully and irreversibly damaged by a lack of oxygen. (2019-04-18)

Compared to sustained inflations for extremely premature infants, standard treatment prevails
Preterm infants must establish regular breathing patterns at delivery. For extremely preterm infants requiring resuscitation at birth, a ventilation strategy involving two sustained inflations, compared with standard intermittent positive pressure ventilation, did not reduce the risk of bronchopulmonary dysplasia or death at 36 weeks postmenstrual age. (2019-03-26)

Sex-based bias: Women in Japan are less likely to receive cardiopulmonary resuscitation in public places from bystanders
Japanese women under 65 are less likely to receive cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) by bystanders when they suffer a sudden cardiac arrest in a public location compared to in a residential location, report investigators in Mayo Clinic Proceedings, published by Elsevier. They speculate that cultural attitudes may influence bystanders and propose that correct knowledge of CPR and better understanding of sex-based disparities are needed to facilitate public health intervention. (2019-03-25)

Jury still out on what confers survival advantage in female trauma patients
Female hormones, particularly estrogen, do not seem to explain why women tend to have higher survival rates than men following severe trauma, an 11-year study using data from 815,843 Swedish patients suggests. The findings are published in the open access Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine. (2019-03-14)

ECG rhythm and airway management make all the difference during a heart attack
Japan-based research examined a large-scale national registry of cardiac arrest cases to measure the effects of advanced airway management (AAM) on one-month outcomes after patients survived. The deep statistical analysis found that patients not needing electrical defibrillation (based on ECG rhythm) and receiving AAM had better outcomes, such as hospital discharge. The results suggest ECG rhythm is a valuable indicator for deciding on whether to use AAM during cardiac arrest. (2019-03-06)

Blindfolded training could help doctors save young lives
Doctors at Geneva University Hospital have found that pediatric team leaders improve more during resuscitation training if they wear a blindfold. Published in Frontiers in Pediatrics, their findings demonstrate a promising tool for improving training and outcomes in pediatric resuscitation. (2019-02-14)

Higher lifetime risk of sudden cardiac death among African Americans may be associated with income and education disparities
African Americans have a much higher lifetime risk of sudden cardiac death than whites, especially among women. The lifetime risk was double overall and three times higher in African American women compared to white women. Disparities in income and education, as well as hypertension, diabetes, and other risk factors, accounted for much of the difference in risk. (2019-02-04)

More Oregonians sharing end-of-life wishes with POLST
More Oregonians are making their end-of-life wishes known through forms known as Physician Order for Life-Sustaining Treatment, or POLST, according to research in the Journal of Palliative Medicine. Researchers also found how people are using the form is changing. (2018-11-28)

Fewer cardiac arrest victims get bystander CPR in Latino neighborhoods
Bystander CPR is provided less frequently in Latino neighborhoods compared to other areas. Cardiac arrest victims in the most heavily Latino-populated neighborhoods were almost 40 percent less likely to survive until discharge from the hospital. (2018-11-05)

Black infants may have higher cardiac arrest rates
Black infants were significantly more likely to suffer cardiac arrest than White or Hispanic children in a review of emergency response records in the Houston area. (2018-11-05)

Two novel studies explore why women receive less CPR from bystanders
Separate studies explore why women are less likely to receive bystander CPR. A small survey found that people may worry that chest compressions by bystanders will seem improper or may hurt women A virtual reality study found that even female avatars were less likely to receive CPR from bystanders in a virtual simulation. (2018-11-05)

Public AEDs cost-effective for saving lives, improving cardiac arrest outcomes
Automated external defibrillators (AEDs) accessible in public places are cost-effective health tools for saving lives and improving cardiac arrest survival, according to two separate research studies to be presented in Chicago at the American Heart Association's Resuscitation Science Symposium 2018, an international conference highlighting the best in cardiovascular resuscitation research. (2018-11-05)

PTSD linked to increased complications and death a year after cardiac arrest
Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms may significantly increase cardiac arrest survivors' risk of major cardiovascular events and death up to a year after the initial medical crisis, according to preliminary research to be presented in Chicago at the American Heart Association's Resuscitation Science Symposium 2018 -- an international conference highlighting the best in cardiovascular resuscitation research. (2018-11-05)

Cardiac arrest survival higher in states with required high school CPR training
Required CPR education in high school may lead to higher bystander CPR and cardiac arrest survival rates, according to preliminary research to be presented in Chicago at the American Heart Association's Resuscitation Science Symposium 2018 -- an international conference highlighting the best in cardiovascular resuscitation research. (2018-11-05)

Best way to assess obstetrics programs? Measure outcomes for both mom, baby
Mothers and babies are dying due to birth-associated complications at higher rates now than a decade ago. In a new study appearing online in Birth, Katherine Campbell, assistant professor of obstetrics, gynecology and reproductive sciences at the Yale School of Medicine, and her team found that that jointly considering morbidity outcomes for mom and baby is the best way to measure the quality of a hospital's obstetrics program. (2018-10-03)

LT breathing tubes after cardiac arrest could save 10,000 more lives
Heart attack patients given a different type of breathing tube by paramedics had better survival rates than those treated by traditional intubation breathing tube methods - findings that could potentially save more than 10,000 lives annually, researchers report. (2018-08-29)

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