Current Retirement News and Events

Current Retirement News and Events, Retirement News Articles.
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Stress was leading reason teachers quit before pandemic, and COVID has made matters worse
Stress was the most common reason teachers cited for leaving the profession before and during the pandemic, according to a RAND Corporation survey of nearly 1,000 former public-school teachers. Three of four former teachers said work was often or always stressful in the most recent year in which they taught in a public school. Teachers cited stress nearly twice as often as insufficient pay as a reason for quitting. (2021-02-22)

Zombie movies prepared you for the pandemic
Tales of post-apocalyptic landscapes in which few survivors emerge into a new and much different world have long been popular tales woven by screenwriters and authors. While many enjoy these stories, thinking of them as nothing but a guilty pleasure, they may not realize that immersing themselves in fiction has prepared them for the reality of 2020, according to a team of researchers. (2021-01-11)

Way to support effective brain performance after head injury backgrounded by lack of sleep
Scientists from the School of Biomedicine of Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU) with colleagues from Italy, Spain, Romania, and Sweden suggest a way to protect the brain and minimize neurodegenerative processes after concussion head injuries in the presence of extensive previous sleep deprivation. This methodology is especially important given the retirement-age increase that has recently become an international trend. A related article appears in the Progress in Brain Research journal. (2020-12-08)

Are people healthy enough to retire later?
While many people are now enjoying longer, healthier lives, current retirement ages are posing challenges for both policymakers and retirees. A new study looked into whether there is potential to increase the retirement age based on the relationship between working life expectancy and health aspects important for work ability for women and men in Europe. (2020-12-07)

Shuttering fossil fuel power plants may cost less than expected
Decarbonizing US electricity production will require both construction of renewable energy sources and retirement of power plants now operated by fossil fuels. A generator-level model described in the December 4, 2020 issue of the journal Science suggests that most fossil fuel power plants could complete normal lifespans and still close by 2035 because so many facilities are nearing the end of their operational lives. (2020-12-03)

Inclusion is key for all to thrive throughout life, report says
When it comes to optimizing 'longevity fitness' through attention to social, health, and wealth aspects of life, many Americans face intractable inequities based on the color of their skin, where they live, their sex, and who they love. The COVID-19 pandemic has further demonstrated the additional impacts affecting these demographics through the increased number of cases and mortality rates. (2020-11-19)

Shared religious experiences bring couples together
Couples that pray together stay together. It's a common religious saying, but a new study from the University of Georgia is giving the proverb some scientific credence. (2020-10-22)

Removal of dairy cows from the United States may reduce essential nutrient supply with little effect on greenhouse gas emissions
A suggested solution to increasing food production worldwide while reducing greenhouse gas emissions has been to eliminate or reduce animal production in favor of plant production. In an article appearing in the Journal of Dairy Science, scientists from Virginia Tech and the US Dairy Forage Research Center studied the effects of dairy product removal on greenhouse gas emissions and nutrient availability in US diets under various removal scenarios. (2020-10-15)

Depression worsens over time for older caregivers of newly diagnosed dementia patients
Caring for a partner or spouse with a new diagnosis of Alzheimer's or related dementia is associated with a 30% increase in depressive symptoms, compared to older adults who don't have a spouse with dementia -- and these symptoms are sustained over time, a new University of Michigan study found. (2020-09-02)

Elderly in the US: Risk of dementia has been rising for years - instead of falling
Risk of cognitive impairment increased from 1996 to 2014. (2020-08-27)

Dementia kills nearly three times more people than previously thought: BU study
Dementia may be an underlying cause of nearly three times more deaths in the U.S. than official records show, according to a new Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) study. (2020-08-24)

Declining US plant breeding programs impacts food security
Decreasing access to funding, technology, and knowledge in U.S. plant breeding programs could negatively impact our future food security. (2020-08-20)

Tendency to select targeted retirement fund ending in zero may impact wealth
New research shows that selecting a targeted retirement fund that ends in a zero could negatively impact your retirement savings. The study identified a ''zero bias'' or tendency for individuals to select retirement funds ending in zero, which affects the amount people contribute to retirement savings and leads to an investment portfolio with an incompatible level of risk. (2020-07-27)

Rural firearm-suicides impacted by socioeconomic, environmental factors
In an attempt to address the escalating rate of self-inflicted firearm injury deaths in rural America, researchers are proposing interventions to reduce these suicides be community-based and include programs to reduce other diseases of despair, such as heart and liver diseases, diabetes and accidental opioid overdose. The recent decline in life expectancy of Americans has been attributed to these diseases of despair and appear to primarily afflict white rural America (2020-07-21)

Study shows humans are optimists for most of life
Researchers from Michigan State University led the largest study of its kind to determine how optimistic people are in life and when as well as how major life events affect how optimistic they are about the future. (2020-07-13)

Light drinking may protect brain function
Light to moderate drinking may preserve brain function in older age, according to a new study from the University of Georgia. (2020-06-30)

UBC study identifies social and behavioral factors most closely associated with dying
Smoking, divorce and alcohol abuse have the closest connection to death out of 57 social and behavioural factors analyzed in this study. The researchers analyzed data collected from 13,611 adults in the U.S. between 1992 and 2008, and identified which factors applied to those who died between 2008 and 2014. They intentionally excluded biological and medical factors. (2020-06-22)

Get it over with, or procrastinate? New research explores our decision-making process
New research from the UBC Sauder School of Business may have figured out why. The study, published in the Journal of Consumer Psychology, reveals key insights into how excitement, anticipation and dread factor into people's decision-making. (2020-06-02)

NUI Galway research highlights the economic costs of workplace bullying
Findings from a new NUI Galway study on workplace bullying, led by Dr John Cullinan of the Discipline of Economics and Dr Margaret Hodgins from the Discipline of Health Promotion, has been published in the journal Occupational Medicine. (2020-05-26)

Can copying your friends help you achieve your goals?
Consumers often struggle to achieve self-set life improvement goals, but what if deliberately emulating the successful strategies used by their friends could help them? (2020-05-26)

New study explores fiscal issues related to NYC teachers retirement system
With city contributions totaling $37 billion in 2018, or 6 percent of tax revenue, TRS has two important characteristics that distinguish it from most other public pension plans in the nation. (2020-03-31)

Rethinking mortality and how we plan for old age
Many people dream of comfortably living out their golden years. A new IIASA study however shows that older Europeans, and especially women, frequently underestimate how many years they have left, which could lead to costly decisions related to planning for their remaining life course. (2020-03-17)

Not finding new goals post-retirement associated with greater cognitive decline
Certain middle-aged and older adults, especially women who tend to disengage from difficult tasks and goals after they retire, may be at greater risk of cognitive decline as they age, according to research published by the American Psychological Association. (2020-03-16)

When older people feel excluded at work
Employees over 50 can feel excluded and demotivated in the workplace for various reasons. They feel particularly excluded when they believe that their cognitive abilities decrease with age, as psychologists from the University of Basel report in the journal 'Work, Aging, and Retirement'. (2020-03-05)

Cynicism and disrespect: A vicious cycle
An international study with data from Europe and the USA has found that disrespectful treatment leads to cynical beliefs about human nature. These cynical beliefs, in turn, again lead to disrespectful treatment. (2020-02-25)

TMI: More information doesn't necessarily help people make better decisions
New research from Stevens Institute of Technology suggests that too much knowledge can lead people to make worse decisions, pointing to a critical gap in our understanding of how new information interacts with prior knowledge and beliefs. (2020-02-21)

Middle-aged adults worried about health insurance costs now, uncertain for future
Health insurance costs weigh heavily on the minds of many middle-aged adults, and many are worried for what they'll face in retirement or if federal health policies change, according to a new study. More than a quarter of people in their 50s and early 60s lack confidence that they'll be able to afford health insurance in the next year, and the number goes up to nearly half when they look ahead to retirement. (2020-02-07)

Avoid paying so people work
Unlike the case in many developed countries, the Russian government is ready to provide financial support to all people who are registered unemployed. That said, the amount of benefits paid is so small that most unemployed simply disregard it. Researchers from HSE University undertook a study of how the unemployed are treated in other countries and proposed measures for improving the situation on Russia's labour market. (2020-01-29)

Advisers not enough to guarantee a strong retirement
Rui Yao, a nationally recognized expert on retirement savings from the University of Missouri, suggests that employees can't trust that the retirement plan sponsored by their employer is in good hands just because the plan uses an adviser. To ensure a strong retirement plan performance, consumers must be active participants in retirement planning, she says. (2020-01-15)

Working women healthier even after retirement age
Study shows that women who worked consistently during their prime midlife working years had better physical health than non-working women later in life. (2019-12-18)

Federal disability payments encourage more family caregiving, study finds
While it's well understood what sources of income and insurance support people who experience a disability, less is known about the mechanisms of how family support changes over the evolution of a disability. A new study finds that federal disability benefits can lead to increases in other support for beneficiaries, such as in-kind assistance from adult children. (2019-12-10)

In sickness and in health: Study looks at how married couples face chronic conditions
When they said their wedding vows, many of them promised to stand by one another in sickness and in health. But a new study suggests that as married couples age and develop chronic conditions, the daily demands of coping with their own health demands and those of their spouse may take a mental toll. (2019-12-03)

Personality traits affect retirement spending
How quickly you spend your savings in retirement may have as much or more to do with your personality than whether you have a lot of debt or want to leave an inheritance. (2019-11-18)

Paid sick leave and flextime benefits result in significantly more retirement savings
Researchers found that workers with flexible work time enjoyed a 24.8 percent increase in retirement savings compared to those without the benefit; workers with paid sick leave had retirement savings 29.6 percent higher than those workers who lacked paid sick leave benefits; and workers with six to 10 paid sick leave days and workers with more than 10 paid sick leave days annually had a statistically and significantly higher amount in their retirement savings (30.1 percent and 40.7 percent, respectively). (2019-11-05)

Research shows that early retirement can accelerate cognitive decline
Early retirement can accelerate cognitive decline among the elderly, according to research conducted by faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York. (2019-10-29)

Heightened risk of adverse financial changes before Alzheimer's diagnosis
Prior to an Alzheimer's diagnosis, a person in the early stages of the disease faces a heightened risk of adverse financial outcomes -- a likely consequence of compromised decision making when managing money, in addition to exploitation and fraud by others. (2019-10-25)

Lowest-paid workers have longest retirements
The study examined the length of time between stopping work and dying among people in England and Wales born before 1951. It found that people in 'unskilled' occupations lived the longest after retiring, while professional workers -- the other end of the social scale -- had the shortest retirements on average. (2019-10-23)

A complex marriage arrangement: New insights and unanswered questions in plant heterostyly
This special issue of New Phytologist explores the ecology, evolution and genetics of plant reproductive systems, an area of research championed and developed by Prof. Spencer Barrett. The collection includes 35 articles integrating the theory, ecology, natural history, evolution, genetics and genomics of plant reproductive systems. It also features a new Tansley review by Prof. Barrett that explores recent advances on the floral polymorphism heterostyly and highlights some unresolved questions. (2019-10-21)

The enigma of bronze age tin
The origin of the tin used in the Bronze Age has long been one of the greatest enigmas in archaeological research. Now researchers from Heidelberg University and the Curt Engelhorn Centre for Archaeometry in Mannheim have solved part of the puzzle. They were able to proof that tin ingots found at archaeological sites in Israel, Turkey, and Greece do not come from Central Asia, as previously assumed, but from tin deposits in Europe. (2019-09-13)

Financial education programs, income-based repayment plans promote prosperity
Financial education programs and income-based repayment plans help young adults with student loan debt prosper after college, according to a study led by University of Illinois social work professor Min Zhan. (2019-09-05)

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