Current Risk Factors News and Events

Current Risk Factors News and Events, Risk Factors News Articles.
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First multi-whole-genome study of IBD in African Americans
In African Americans, the genetic risk landscape for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is very different from that of people with European ancestry, according to results of the first whole-genome study of IBD in African Americans. The authors say that future clinical research on IBD needs to take ancestry into account. (2021-02-19)

Certain factors are linked with an elevated risk of bone fractures
A new study published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research has identified various factors that may indicate whether a person faces a higher likelihood of experiencing a bone fracture over the next two decades. (2021-02-18)

Vets' depression, social support & psychological resilience play role in later well being
Veterans who experienced the combination of low depression, high social support and high psychological resilience as they left military service were most likely to report high well-being a year later. (2021-02-17)

Radiomics shows cocaine fuels coronary artery disease risk
Radiomics--the extraction of very detailed quantitative features from medical images--provides a refined understanding of how cocaine use and other risk factors affect the course of coronary artery disease, according to a new study. Researchers said the study shows the power of radiomics to improve understanding of not just cardiovascular disease, but cancer and other conditions as well. (2021-02-16)

Mid-life cardiovascular disease prevention may protect against later dementia
Employing cardiovascular disease prevention strategies in mid-life may delay or stop the brain alterations that can lead to dementia later in life, according to a study in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. (2021-02-15)

Clues for improving sleep in visually impaired athletes
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba have found that approximately one-third of a group of visually impaired athletes had sleep disorders. A later wake-up time and stress regarding interpersonal relationships in competition activities were related to the rate of sleep disorders. Addressing these factors may be key in improving sleep quality in this population. (2021-02-14)

Small is big: the need for a holistic approach to manage cerebral small vessel disease
Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) is a complex brain disease that presents as a wide range of symptoms, starting with mild neurological and physical indications that worsen with age. The vast array of risk factors and varying degrees of success of interventions call for improvement in diagnostic and management strategies. Now, in a new review, researchers from the United Kingdom discuss the clinical aspects of SVD to improve the understanding of disease progression and management. (2021-02-11)

Endovascular aneurysm repair linked to higher readmission rates
Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (rAAA) are responsible for nearly 2% of all deaths in U.S. men over the age of 65. Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) has emerged as a newer and less invasive alternative to open repair for rAAA. But researchers from the University of Missouri School of Medicine have discovered that while EVAR is more commonly utilized for rAA, the odds of hospital readmission after EVAR are 1.5 times higher compared to traditional open repair. (2021-02-10)

Higher blood pressure at night than in daytime may increase Alzheimer's disease risk
Higher blood pressure at night than in daytime may be a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease in older men. This is suggested by a new study from researchers at Uppsala University, now published in the journal Hypertension. (2021-02-08)

Happy childhood? That's no guarantee for good mental health
It's well understood that a difficult childhood can increase the likelihood of mental illness, but according to new research from the University of South Australia, a happy and secure childhood does not always protect a child from developing a mental illness later in life. (2021-02-07)

Cancer leading cause of death among people with diabetes
Cancer is the leading cause of death among people with diabetes in England. (2021-02-04)

Personalized screening to identify teens with high suicide risk
Researchers have developed a personalized system to better detect suicidal youths. (2021-02-03)

Maternal mental health needs attention during COVID-19 lockdowns
Mothers are at increased risk of mental health problems as they struggle to balance the demands of childcare and remote working in COVID-19 lockdowns, according to new research from an international team of researchers. (2021-02-03)

Social & structural factors influence racial disparities in COVID-19 mortality
COVID-19 mortality racial disparities in the US are associated with social factors like income, education and internet access, rather than biology, according to a Rutgers study. (2021-01-31)

COVID-19: 1 in 3 adults anxious, depressed
COVID-19 has led to psychological distress among one in three adults, systematic review and meta-analysis reveals. (2021-01-28)

Risk-taking linked to particular brain features
There is a common genetic and neurobiological basis for risky behavior - the genetic disposition for risk-taking is mapped in several areas of the brain, a UZH study shows. The study combines genetic information and brain scans from more than 25,000 people for the first time. (2021-01-28)

New gene variant linked to stroke
Researchers at Lund University in Sweden believe they have identified a gene variant that can cause cerebral small vessel disease and stroke. The study is published in Neurology Genetics. (2021-01-28)

To ward off cancer and other diseases we need to change our lifestyle and focus on innovation
The key factor in preventing non-communicable diseases is lifestyle management at the individual level with a focus on such innovations, which can help increase the awareness of risk factors management in society, claim an international team of researchers, among them - scientists from Kaunas University of Technology (KTU), Lithuania in a recent study. According to them, the management of cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular and respiratory diseases requires many strategies from several perspectives and on different levels. (2021-01-25)

Air pollution linked to higher risk of sight loss from AMD
Air pollution is linked to a heightened risk of progressive and irreversible sight loss, known as age related macular degeneration (AMD), reveals a large long term study led by UCL researchers, published in the British Journal of Ophthalmology. (2021-01-25)

NIH-funded study examines mono, chronic fatigue syndrome in college students
Many college students fully recover from infectious mononucleosis (which is almost always caused by Epstein-Barr virus) within 1-6 weeks, but some go on to develop chronic fatigue syndrome, also called myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME/CFS). A longitudinal study from DePaul University and Northwestern University followed 4,501 college students to examine risk factors that may trigger longer illness. (2021-01-22)

Risk factors for intraoperative pressure injury in aortic surgery
In a new publication from Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications; DOI https://doi.org/10.15212/CVIA.2019.1263, Yao Dong, Jun-E Liu and Ling Song from the Capital Medical University, Beijing, China consider risk factors for intraoperative pressure injury in aortic surgery. (2021-01-22)

CNIO participates in a study that defines the most important genes that increase breast cancer risk
* The study will help to improve prevention programmes since it ''defines the most useful genes'' for breast cancer risk prediction tests, the authors write * The study will be published in the 'New England Journal of Medicine' (NEJM) and is authored by 250 researchers from dozens of institutions in more than 25 countries * Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers today. One in eight women will develop it in their lifetime (2021-01-21)

Study updates breast cancer risk estimates for women with no family history
A new multi-institution study led by Fergus Couch, Ph.D., a Mayo Clinic pathologist, provides more accurate estimates of breast cancer risk for U.S. women who harbor inherited mutations in breast cancer predisposition genes. The findings of the CARRIERS Consortium study, published Jan. 20 in The New England Journal of Medicine, may allow health care providers to better assess the risk of breast cancer in women ? many of whom have no family history of breast cancer. (2021-01-21)

Study finds genetic clues to pneumonia risk and COVID-19 disparities
Researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center and colleagues have identified genetic factors that increase the risk for developing pneumonia and its severe, life-threatening consequences. (2021-01-21)

Counting patients social determinants of health may help doctors avert fatal heart attacks
Doctors may be able to predict their patients' risks of fatal coronary heart disease more accurately by taking into account the number of adverse social factors affecting them, according to a new study led by researchers at Weill Cornell Medicine and NewYork-Presbyterian. (2021-01-21)

Altering mealtimes could prevent development of Type 2 diabetes
An innovative new study is set to examine if changing our mealtimes to earlier or later in the day could reduce the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. (2021-01-15)

Increased risk of Parkinson's disease in patients with schizophrenia
A new study conducted at the University of Turku, Finland, shows that patients with a schizophrenia spectrum disorder have an increased risk of Parkinson's disease later in life. The increased risk may be due to alterations in the brain's dopamine system caused by dopamine receptor antagonists or neurobiological effects of schizophrenia. (2021-01-15)

High insulin levels during childhood a risk for mental health problems in adulthood, study suggests
Researchers have shown that the link between physical and mental illness is closer than previously thought. Certain changes in physical health, which are detectable in childhood, are linked with the development of mental illness in adulthood. (2021-01-13)

Depression and stress could dampen efficacy of COVID-19 vaccines
Health behaviors and emotional stressors can alter the body's ability to develop an immune response to vaccines, including--potentially--the new COVID-19 vaccines. Simple interventions, including exercising and getting a good night's sleep in the 24 hours before vaccination, may maximize the vaccine's initial effectiveness. (2021-01-13)

Study gauges psychological impact of COVID-19 pandemic on university students
More than half of all university students in the United States have experienced high levels of psychological impact from the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a new study published in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Matthew Browning of Clemson University, US, and colleagues. (2021-01-13)

First-degree relative with kidney disease increases disease risk by three-fold
In a large population-based family study, family history of kidney disease was strongly associated with increased risk of chronic kidney disease. (2021-01-12)

Does a mother's pre-pregnancy weight affect her children's future fertility?
A recent study published in Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica found that sons born to mothers who fell within the overweight range were more likely to be diagnosed with infertility during adulthood than sons of mothers with normal-range weight. (2021-01-06)

In-utero exposures associated with increased risk of thyroid cancer
A recent study shows that thyroid cancer is related to in-utero exposures. (2021-01-05)

New mammogram measures of breast cancer risk could revolutionise screening
World-first techniques for predicting breast cancer risk from mammograms that were developed in Melbourne could revolutionise breast screening by allowing it to be tailored to women at minimal extra cost. (2020-12-22)

For college students, skin cancer risk remains high in winter months
New research finds college students could be just as at risk for developing skin cancer in the dead of winter as they are in the middle of summer. (2020-12-17)

Two new studies offer ways to avert accidents and workplace injuries for American workers
Human error is a causal factor in up to 80 percent of workplace accidents. A new study measuring the eye movements and cognitive processes for at-risk workers, sheds new light on the potential to avert accidents and possibly prevent workplace injuries. The study 'Measuring attention, working memory, and visual perception to reduce risk of injuries in the construction industry,' by Behzad Esmaeili, Ph.D., George Mason University challenges the conventional, reactionary paradigm of safety-risk management (2020-12-17)

UC Study: Suicide watch more important now than ever
The study, conducted at UC's Center for Prevention Science, found that between 2015 to 2018, there was a 16% increase in suicide ideation, an 18.6% increase in suicide planning, and an 11.6% increase in suicide attempts. Additionally, significant increases in each behavior were found in African Americans, younger adults, sexual minorities, and individuals who reported past-year drug use. Among these higher-risk groups, the largest increases in suicidal behaviors were African Americans. (2020-12-16)

Patients with COVID-19 and obesity have poor outcomes not driven by inflammation
Obesity is associated with poor COVID-19 outcomes but a new study suggests this is not due to increased inflammation, but instead may be driven by respiratory issues or other factors. (2020-12-16)

Genes play a role in common knee injury
It has long been known that the choice of shoe, surface and type of sport can all be contributing factors when someone suffers an anterior cruciate ligament rupture. Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have now observed that genes also play a decisive role. (2020-12-15)

Better heart health scores in midlife linked to lower risk of late-life dementia
A long-term study of 1,449 people in Finland found that those who had better scores on standard metrics of cardiovascular health in midlife, especially for behavioral factors such as smoking, had a lower risk of dementia later in life. Yajun Liang of Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm, Sweden, and colleagues present these findings in the open-access journal PLOS Medicine. (2020-12-15)

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