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Novel genomic tools increase the accuracy of breast cancer risk assessment
Findings from the FinnGen study encompassing 120,000 women indicate that inherited breast cancer risk should be assessed in an increasingly comprehensive manner. Currently, only individual gene mutations are taken into consideration in breast cancer therapy and prevention. The study demonstrates that more extensive genomic data can be used to identify women who are at high risk of breast cancer with considerably greater accuracy. Such knowledge can especially improve risk assessment among the close relatives of breast cancer patients. (2020-12-14)

Higher variability in glomerular filtration rate is associated with higher mortality
In this paper published in the American Journal of Kidney Diseases (AJKD), researchers evaluated associations between eGFR variability and subsequent cardiovascular disease (CVD) events and all-cause mortality among SPRINT participants. They found that greater eGFR variability was associated with higher risk of all-cause mortality independent of baseline eGFR, albuminuria, and other risk factors. (2020-12-14)

Vitamin D the clue to more Autism spectrum disorder in boys
Professor Darryl Eyles and Dr Asad Ali from UQ's Queensland Brain Institute found vitamin D deficiency during pregnancy caused an increase in testosterone in the developing brain of male rats. Low vitamin D in mothers is one of the risk factors for Autism spectrum disorder, which is three times as common in boys. (2020-12-11)

New online COVID-19 mortality risk calculator could help determine who should get vaccines first
A new online calculator for estimating individual and community-level risk of dying from COVID-19 has been developed by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. (2020-12-11)

Insufficient screening for heart damage after noncardiac surgery puts patients at risk
About five percent of patients experience heart muscle injury around the time of their surgery for a noncardiac condition, yet guideline recommendations to identify patients at risk using biomarkers are not being followed. A five-year study in Alberta, Canada appearing in the Canadian Journal of Cardiology, published by Elsevier, determined that the recommended biomarker screening is very much underutilized. (2020-12-10)

Psychiatric disorders explain increased risk for self-harm in autism spectrum disorders
A population-based study revealed reasons behind elevated suicide risk, attempted suicides, and other self-harm, which require special health care, among adolescents and young adults with autism spectrum disorders. Comorbid disorders, especially non-affective psychoses and affective and anxiety disorders, explained the risk. (2020-12-10)

Diabetes in dogs may indicate elevated risk of type 2 diabetes in their owners
Owners of a dog with diabetes are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes than owners of a dog without diabetes. No shared risk of diabetes could be detected for cat owners and their cats. These novel findings, from a register-based study conducted at Uppsala University in collaboration with three other universities, have now been published in The BMJ. (2020-12-10)

More years of obesity means higher risk of disease, study finds
A greater obesity duration is associated with worse values for all cardiometabolic disease factors, according to a new study published this week in PLOS Medicine by Tom Norris of Loughborough University, UK, and colleagues. (2020-12-08)

UTSA researchers study the effects of parental job loss on families during the pandemic
A team of UTSA researchers has discovered that economic implications because of COVID-19 can have a devastating ripple effect on children. Monica Lawson, assistant professor of psychology, Megan Piel, assistant professor of social work and Michaela Simon, psychology graduate student in the UTSA College for Health, Community and Policy, have recently published a research article on the effects of parental job loss during the COVID-19 pandemic and risk of psychological and physical abuse toward children. (2020-12-07)

Researchers urge priority vaccination for individuals with diabetes
Vanderbilt University Medical Center researchers have discovered individuals with type 1 and type 2 diabetes infected with COVID-19 are three times more likely to have a severe illness or require hospitalization compared with people without diabetes. (2020-12-04)

New review confirms disproportionate impact of COVID-19 on Black, Hispanic populations
Black and Hispanic populations are disproportionately affected by COVID-19, according to a systematic review published this week. The disparities were likely related to minority populations being at higher risk of exposure to the coronavirus as opposed to underlying health conditions or other factors, according to the review led by researchers at Oregon Health & Science University and the VA Portland Health Care System. (2020-12-03)

Drinking linked to a decline in brain health from cradle to grave
The evidence for the harmful effects of alcohol on brain health is compelling, but now experts have pin-pointed three key time periods in life when the effects of alcohol are likely to be at their greatest. (2020-12-03)

Small and large birth weight linked to genetics of mother and baby -- except in tiniest babies
Genetics of mother and baby contribute to most cases where babies are born very large or very small, according to new research. (2020-12-02)

Birth defects linked to greater risk of cancer in later life
People born with major birth defects face a higher risk of cancer throughout life, although the relative risk is greatest in childhood and then declines, finds a study published by The BMJ today. (2020-12-02)

Replacing red meat with plant foods may reduce the risk of heart disease
Replacing red meat with high quality plant foods such as beans, nuts, or soy may be associated with a modestly reduced risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), suggests a study published by The BMJ today. (2020-12-02)

Researchers have discovered new links between miscarriage and maternal genes
Researchers at the Estonian Genome Center at the University of Tartu described hitherto undiscovered associations between miscarriage and maternal genes, reveals a recent article published in the Nature Communication. (2020-11-25)

Genetic study shows that the risk of pre-eclampsia is related to blood pressure and BMI
An international study, coordinated by experts from the University of Nottingham, has revealed that the genetic risk of pre-eclampsia - a potentially dangerous condition in pregnancy - is related to blood pressure and body mass index. (2020-11-25)

Early birth linked to greater risk of hospital visits during childhood
Being born early (before 37 weeks' gestation) is associated with a higher risk of hospital admission throughout childhood than being born at full term (40 weeks' gestation), finds a study published by The BMJ today. (2020-11-25)

Better survival among women after lung cancer surgery
There are known differences in the survival rates of women and men with lung cancer. Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden set out to investigate potential reasons behind this disparity, such as the presence of other underlying diseases and smoking status. The study, which was published in Chest, shows that women have better survival rates after lung cancer surgery than men, independent of other factors. (2020-11-23)

Link between periodontitis and cardiovascular disease in individuals with rheumatoid arthritis
Rates of both periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease are elevated in individuals with rheumatoid arthritis. New research published in Arthritis & Rheumatology suggests that immune responses to certain bacteria that cause periodontal disease may play a role in patients' higher cardiovascular disease risk. (2020-11-18)

Obese people found to be at increased risk of COVID-19
A new study led by researchers at Queen Mary University of London uses a novel approach to investigate the effects of cardiovascular risk factors on the risk of COVID-19 infection. (2020-11-16)

Preventing heart disease should be a priority for people with Type 2 diabetes
Even when risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease are optimally controlled, adults with Type 2 diabetes still have a greater risk of developing cardiovascular disease compared to the general population, according to new research published today in the American Heart Association's flagship journal Circulation. (2020-11-16)

Early life risk factors predict higher obesity and cardiometabolic risk
Early life risk factors in the first 1000 days cumulatively predict higher obesity and cardiometabolic risk in early adolescence, according to new research led by the Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute. The study is the first to evaluate the combined influence of early life risk factors with direct measures of adiposity (body mass index, fat-mass index) and metabolic risk in early adolescence. (2020-11-16)

Early-life events linked to lung health in young adulthood
Early-life events, such as the exposure to air pollutants, increases the risk of chronic lung disease in young adulthood, according to new results by researchers at Karolinska Institutet, Sweden, published in the European Respiratory Journal and Thorax. The studies add to the growing evidence that chronic lung disease in adulthood can be traced back to childhood. (2020-11-12)

Children born extremely preterm are more likely to be diagnosed with depression
A study using extensive nationwide registry data showed that girls born extremely preterm, earlier than 28 weeks gestational age, were three times more likely to be diagnosed with depression than peers born close to the expected date of delivery. Increased risk of depression also applied to girls and boys with poor fetal growth born full-term and post-term. The effects of poor fetal growth were more evident with increasing gestational age. (2020-11-12)

Sixty-year old cohort study reveals adolescent value predicts wellbeing in older age
Subjective wellbeing leads to better health, but we did not know what in our younger years determines our wellbeing in old age. Researchers at the Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science have demonstrated that adolescents who valued their interests and curiosity had higher wellbeing in old age from a 60-year-old cohort in the UK. We additionally found that adolescents with low self-control who valued money and steady jobs had significantly lower wellbeing in old age. (2020-11-11)

Diagnostic imaging may increase risk of testicular cancer
Early and repeated exposures to diagnostic imaging, such as X-rays and CT scans, may increase the risk of testicular cancer. (2020-11-11)

Psychological status rather than cognitive status is associated with incorrect perception of risk of falling in patients with moderate stage dementia
Dementia is associated with an impaired self-perception with potentially harmful consequences for health status and clinical risk classification in this patient group with an extraordinary high risk of falling. (2020-11-10)

Why people with dementia go missing
People with dementia are more likely to go missing in areas where road networks are dense, complicated and disordered - according to new research from the University of East Anglia. Researchers studied hundreds of 'missing person' police reports for people with dementia and compared each case to the surrounding road network. They hope their findings could help inform future safeguarding guidelines. (2020-10-29)

Socio-demographic determinants of overweight and obesity among mothers in South Africa
To investigate the socio-demographic determinants of overweight and obesity among mothers of primary school children living in a rural Dikgale Health and Demographic Surveillance System Site in South Africa (2020-10-28)

Cognitive disorders linked to severe COVID-19 risk
Dementia and other cognitive disorders now appear to be risk factors for developing severe COVID-19, according to research from the University of Georgia. (2020-10-28)

Couples share heart disease risk factors and behaviors
In 79 percent of couples, both people fell into the non-ideal category for cardiovascular health, with most sharing unhealthy diets and getting inadequate exercise. (2020-10-26)

Multiple sclerosis as the flip side of immune fitness
About half of the people with multiple sclerosis have the HLA-DR15 gene variant. A study led by the University of Zurich has now shown how this genetic predisposition contributes to the development of the autoimmune disease multiple sclerosis in combination with environmental factors. The decisive factor is the shaping of a repertoire of immune cells which - although they are effective in fighting off pathogens such as Epstein-Barr virus - also attack brain tissue. (2020-10-22)

Glomerular diseases linked to higher risk of cardiovascular conditions
Adults with glomerular diseases have a 2.5-times higher risk of developing cardiovascular disease than individuals in the general population. Results from the study will be presented online during ASN Kidney Week 2020 Reimagined October 19-October 25. (2020-10-22)

Serum creatinine-to- cystatin C ratio predicts mortality
In patients initiating continuous renal replacement therapy for acute kidney injury, higher serum creatinine-to-cystatin C ratios were associated with lower mortality. (2020-10-21)

Dementia prevention strategies could save £1.9 billion annually
Programmes to reduce dementia risk by targeting smoking, high blood pressure and hearing loss are likely to be cost-effective and cost saving by reducing dementia rates by 8.5%, finds a new study by UCL and LSE researchers, published in The Lancet Healthy Longevity. (2020-10-20)

Drinking green tea and coffee daily linked to lower death risk in people with diabetes
Drinking plenty of both green tea and coffee is linked to a lower risk of dying from any cause among people with type 2 diabetes, suggests research published in the online journal BMJ Open Diabetes Research & Care. (2020-10-20)

New risk model estimates likelihood of death or hospitalization from COVID-19
Evidence-based model uses a range of factors such as age, sex, ethnicity and existing medical conditions to predict risk of death or hospitalization from COVID-19. Model provides nuanced information on people's risk of serious illness due to COVID-19 and has the potential to help patients and doctors reach a shared understanding of risk. The 'living' risk prediction model will be updated regularly as our understanding of COVID-19 increases and more data become available. (2020-10-20)

Suicide prevention in COVID-19 era
COVID-19 presents a new and urgent opportunity to focus political will, federal investments, and global community on the vital imperative of suicide prevention. Suicide prevention in the COVID-19 era requires addressing not only pandemic-specific suicide risk factors, but also prepandemic risk factors. (2020-10-16)

Young women who suffer a heart attack have worse outcomes than men
Women aged 50 or younger who suffer a heart attack are more likely than men to die over the following 11 years, according to a new study published in the European Heart Journal. The study found that women were less likely to undergo therapeutic invasive procedures after admission to hospital with a heart attack or to be treated with certain medical therapies upon discharge, such as aspirin, beta-blockers, ACE inhibitors and statins. (2020-10-13)

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