Current Robotic Surgery News and Events

Current Robotic Surgery News and Events, Robotic Surgery News Articles.
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Researchers grow artificial hairs with clever physics trick
Things just got hairy at Princeton. Researchers found they could coat a liquid elastic on the outside of a disc and spin it to form useful, complex patterns. When spun just right, tiny spindles rise from the material as it cures. The spindles grow as the disc accelerates, forming a soft solid that resembles hairs. Published in PNAS Feb. 22 (2021-02-22)

UCLA study finds combination therapy suppresses pancreatic tumor growth in mice
UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers have uncovered a potential new way to target pancreatic tumors that express high intratumoral interferon signaling (IFN). (2021-02-18)

New potential therapy for Crohn's disease in children
Scientists from the Stanley Manne Children's Research Institute at Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago demonstrated that a nanotherapy reduces intestinal inflammation and shrinks lesions in a rodent model of severe Crohn's disease. (2021-02-17)

Robotic dogs & laughter therapy: combating loneliness & isolation while social distancing
Robotic dogs, laughter therapy and mindfulness are some of the ways that might help people - particularly the elderly - cope with loneliness and social isolation while social distancing, say researchers at the University of Cambridge. (2021-02-17)

Credit card-sized soft pumps power wearable artificial muscles
Robotic clothing that is entirely soft and could help people to move more easily is a step closer to reality thanks to the development of a new flexible and lightweight power system for soft robotics. (2021-02-17)

Advances in x-ray imaging can help patients with breast cancer
A new approach to X-ray imaging can help surgeons performing breast cancer tumour removal surgery, giving 2.5 times better detection of diseased tissue around the edge of the tumour than with standard imaging. (2021-02-17)

Aspirin preferred to prevent blood clots in kids after heart surgery
Aspirin should be favoured over warfarin to prevent blood clotting in children who undergo a surgery that replumbs their hearts, according to a new study. (2021-02-14)

Emerging robotics technology may lead to better buildings in less time
Emerging robotics technology may soon help construction companies and contractors create buildings in less time at higher quality and at lower costs. Purdue University innovators developed and are testing a novel construction robotic system that uses an innovative mechanical design with advances in computer vision sensing technology to work in a construction setting. (2021-02-10)

Endovascular aneurysm repair linked to higher readmission rates
Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (rAAA) are responsible for nearly 2% of all deaths in U.S. men over the age of 65. Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) has emerged as a newer and less invasive alternative to open repair for rAAA. But researchers from the University of Missouri School of Medicine have discovered that while EVAR is more commonly utilized for rAA, the odds of hospital readmission after EVAR are 1.5 times higher compared to traditional open repair. (2021-02-10)

Fetal surgery for spina bifida leads to better mobility in school-age children
Adding to a growing body of research affirming the benefits of fetal surgery for spina bifida, new findings show prenatal repair of the spinal column confers physical gains that extend into childhood. The researchers found that children who had undergone fetal surgery for myelomeningocele, the most severe form of spina bifida, were more likely than those who received postnatal repair to walk independently, go up and down stairs, and perform self-care tasks like using a fork, washing hands and brushing teeth. (2021-02-08)

Sleep studies in children with sleep disordered breathing could influence treatment
A new study recommends healthy children with symptoms of sleep disordered breathing, such as snoring or temporary cessation of breathing, should consider undergoing a sleep study (polysomnography) and should discuss the potential benefits of this with their pediatrician or otolaryngologist to possibly manage the child's symptoms medically and before surgery. (2021-02-05)

Model predicts likelihood of persistent high-dose opioid use after knee surgery
A new study published in Arthritis Care & Research has identified 10 readily available clinical factors that may predict which patients will persistently use high doses of opioids in the year following knee replacement surgery. (2021-02-03)

Artificial skin brings robots closer to 'touching' human lives
Modern-day robots are often required to interact with humans intelligently and efficiently, which can be enabled by providing them the ability to perceive touch. However, previous attempts at mimicking human skin have involved bulky and complex electronics, wiring, and a risk of damage. In a recent study, researchers from Japan sidestep these difficulties by constructing a 3D vision-guided artificial skin that enables tactile sensing with high performance, opening doors to innumerable applications in medicine, healthcare, and industry. (2021-02-03)

How modern robots are developed
Robots are interesting to neuroscience and neuroscience is interesting to robots - this is what the article 'Neuroengineering challenges of fusing robotics and neuroscience' was about in the journal Science Robotics. Such collaborative development contributes to progress in both fields, bringing us closer to developing more advanced android robots and a deeper understanding of the structure of the human brain. And, to some extent, to combining biological organisms with machines, to create cybernetic organisms (cyborgs). (2021-02-03)

An origami-inspired medical patch for sealing internal injuries
MIT engineers have designed an origami-inspired medical patch for minimally invasive sealing of internal injuries, which could also be used in robotic surgery for remote repair of damaged tissues and organs. (2021-02-02)

Alternate type of surgery may prevent total knee replacement
An underused type of knee surgery in younger patients, called high tibial osteotomy, shows considerable success in reducing the need for total knee replacement, according to new research in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) www.cmaj.ca/lookup/doi/10.1503/cmaj.200934. (2021-02-01)

New research looks at teen bariatric surgery outcomes by age
Researchers at Children's Hospital Colorado have found that both younger and older adolescents have similar weight loss, resolution of high blood pressure and high cholesterol, nutritional impacts and improvement in quality of life after bariatric surgery. These results strongly indicate that, when working with adolescents with severe obesity, age alone should not dissuade providers and patients from pursuing surgery when medically indicated. (2021-02-01)

'COVID effect' leads to fewer heart surgeries, more patient deaths
The most deadly global health crisis in a century has resulted in a substantial decline in overall heart surgery volume and an unexplained increase in deaths after coronary artery bypass grafting. (2021-01-30)

Robotic exoskeleton training expands options for stroke rehabilitation
Researchers are applying new technologies to gait training that may offer advantages over traditional labor intensive physical therapy. This inpatient study of a robotic exoskeleton (Ekso GT, Ekso Bionics, Inc,) demonstrated the potential to improve gait training after acute stroke toward the goal of earlier recovery of motor function. ''We found that gait training in the exoskeleton allowed us to increase the dose of gait training without increasing the duration of inpatient rehabilitation,'' said Dr. Nolan, (2021-01-29)

Controlling pain after surgery doesn't have to mean opioids, study shows
As surgeons balance the need to control their patients' post-surgery pain with the risk that a routine operation could become the gateway to long-term opioid use or addiction, a new study shows the power of an approach that takes a middle way. (2021-01-27)

Losing weight before knee surgery may not be beneficial for people with arthritis: Study
University of Alberta researchers find no evidence that BMI is a good determinant of surgical outcomes for osteoarthritis. (2021-01-27)

Post-surgery death rates higher among cancer patients in lower-income countries
Research by an international team of medical experts has found cancer patients could be up to four times more likely to die following cancer surgery in low to lower-middle income countries than in high-income countries. It also revealed lower-income countries are less likely to have post-operative care infrastructure and oncology services. (2021-01-25)

Risk factors for intraoperative pressure injury in aortic surgery
In a new publication from Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications; DOI https://doi.org/10.15212/CVIA.2019.1263, Yao Dong, Jun-E Liu and Ling Song from the Capital Medical University, Beijing, China consider risk factors for intraoperative pressure injury in aortic surgery. (2021-01-22)

Pre-surgery chemotherapy is possible for early stage pancreatic cancer patients
A first-of-its-kind randomized clinical trial found that patients with pancreatic cancer didn't live any longer than expected after receiving pre-operative chemotherapy from either of the two standard regimens, according to trial results published in JAMA Oncology. (2021-01-21)

A new study shows the relationship between surgery and Alzheimer's disease
Amsterdam, January 21, 2021 - A new study published in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease carried out by researchers at the Marqués de Valdecilla-IDIVAL University Hospital, in collaboration with researchers at the University of Bonn Medical Center, proposes that major surgery is a promoter or accelerator of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The first author of the publication was Carmen Lage and the principal investigator Pascual Sánchez-Juan. (2021-01-21)

Gastrointestinal surgery can be a cure for type 2 diabetes finds new long-term study
The results of a randomised clinical trial with the longest follow up to date show that metabolic surgery is more effective than medications and lifestyle interventions in the long-term control of severe type 2 diabetes. (2021-01-21)

How to train a robot (using AI and supercomputers)
Computer scientists from UT Arlington developed a deep learning method to create realistic objects for virtual environments that can be used to train robots. The researchers used TACC's Maverick2 supercomputer to train the generative adversarial network. The network is the first that can produce colored point clouds with fine details at multiple resolutions. The team presented their results at the International Conference on 3D Vision (3DV) in Nov. 2020. (2021-01-19)

Error protected quantum bits entangled
For the first time, physicists from the University of Innsbruck have entangled two quantum bits distributed over several quantum objects and successfully transmitted their quantum properties. This marks an important milestone in the development of fault-tolerant quantum computers. The researchers published their report in Nature. (2021-01-13)

Taking the lab into the ocean: A fleet of robots tracks and monitors microbial communities
A new paper describes how researchers at MBARI, the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa (UH Mānoa), and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, enabled a trio of self-driving robots to locate, follow, and sample a layer of oceanic microbes as they drifted in an open-ocean eddy north of the Hawaiian islands. (2021-01-13)

Robotic swarm swims like a school of fish
A team of Harvard researchers have developed fish-inspired robots that can synchronize their movements like a real school of fish, without any external control. It is the first time researchers have demonstrated complex 3D collective behaviors with implicit coordination in underwater robots. (2021-01-13)

New insights into pancreatitis
Acute Pancreatitis (AP) is one of the most common diseases around the world. Associated with a considerable risk of morbidity and even death in patients who suffer a severe form of the disease, to date there is no specific treatment for it. Now international AP experts have published a roadmap in the journal Gut (BMJ) pinpointing the two most significant thresholds in the disease that could serve as a starting point for targeting treatment strategies for this extremely painful condition. (2021-01-13)

Tapping the brain to boost stroke rehabilitation
Stroke survivors who had ceased to benefit from conventional rehabilitation gained clinically significant arm movement and control by using an external robotic device powered by the patients' own brains. (2021-01-12)

New process evaluates patients for elective surgeries following COVID-19
Acknowledging that COVID-19 may be here to stay, Oregon Health & Science University has laid out a series of steps to prepare patients for elective surgery following their illness. The evaluation, outlined in a commentary published in the journal Perioperative Medicine, is believed to be the first published protocol laying out a COVID-era path forward in American medicine. (2021-01-12)

Good results for groin hernia operations not performed by doctors in Sierra Leone
In countries with a severe shortage of surgeons it is common for some operations to be done by medical staff with lower formal qualifications. Researchers at Karolinska Institutet, Sweden, have led a study on the safety and efficacy of a common surgical procedure. The study, published in JAMA Network Open, shows that inguinal hernia operations performed by associate clinicians at a Sierra Leone hospital were just as safe and effective as those performed by doctors. (2021-01-11)

Penn Medicine surgeons develop universal patient-reported outcomes tool to improve hernia care
Penn Medicine researchers have successfully developed, tested, and implemented a first-of-its-kind, patient-informed questionnaire tool for ventral hernia repair surgery patients that could be broadly used to improve the way clinicians care for patients and potentially outcomes. (2021-01-11)

Deep learning helps predicting occult peritoneal metastasis in stomach cancer
A new study led by the Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology (SIAT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences shows that deep learning can help predicting the occult peritoneal metastasis in stomach cancer. It provides a novel and noninvasive approach for stomach cancer patients and may inform individualized surgical management of stomach cancer. (2021-01-07)

Antibiotics not needed after most sinus surgeries: randomized controlled trial
Randomized controlled trial comparing antibiotics and placebo after routine endoscopic sinus surgery found no difference in outcomes including infection rates and symptoms. More gastrointestinal side effects were reported in patients taking antibiotics. (2021-01-06)

Evolving the surgical microscope
Ma and Fei explain how surgical microscopes are modified into slightly different optical configurations and equipped with specific imaging modalities and platforms for different surgical applications. (2021-01-05)

Scientists find out how nutrition affects the recovery of patients after cardiac surgery
Scientists from St Petersburg University have found out how eating habits of patients affect their recovery after cardiac surgery. People with valvular heart disease have appeared to be at risk. (2020-12-25)

Astigmatism measures and corneal power obtained with different devices
The aim of the research is to compare the keratometric and total corneal astigmatism measures provided by three different technologies as well as to assess the level of interchangeability among them. (2020-12-22)

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