Current Robotics News and Events

Current Robotics News and Events, Robotics News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 23 | 910 Results
SUTD research team extends 4D printing to nanophotonics
The newly developed shape memory polymer resist which allows for high-resolution 4D printing, promises a platform for information hiding for optical anti-counterfeiting and tunable photonic devices. (2021-01-22)

Squid-inspired robot swims with nature's most efficient marine animals
Scientists at the University of Southampton and University of Edinburgh have developed a flexible underwater robot that can propel itself through water in the same style as nature's most efficient swimmer - the Aurelia aurita jellyfish. (2021-01-20)

Appreciating a flower's texture, color, and shape leads to better drone landings
A team of TU Delft and the Westphalian University of Applied Sciences researchers present an optical flow-based learning process that allows robots to estimate distances through the visual appearance (shape, color, texture) of the objects in view. This artificial intelligence (AI)-based learning strategy increases the navigation skills of small flying drones and entails a new hypothesis on insect intelligence. (2021-01-19)

Fastener with microscopic mushroom design holds promise
A fastener with a microscopic design that looks like tiny mushrooms could mean advances for everyday consumers and scientific fields. Currently available fasteners are called hook and loop fasteners and require harder, stiff material. In Biointerphases, researchers describe a design that can use softer materials and still be strong. The team believes a 3D mushroom design can be made with softer, more flexible materials and provide sufficient interlocking force on the fabric and hold strong. (2021-01-19)

How to keep drones flying when a motor fails
Robotics researchers at the University of Zurich show how onboard cameras can be used to keep damaged quadcopters in the air and flying stably -- even without GPS. (2021-01-13)

Robotic swarm swims like a school of fish
A team of Harvard researchers have developed fish-inspired robots that can synchronize their movements like a real school of fish, without any external control. It is the first time researchers have demonstrated complex 3D collective behaviors with implicit coordination in underwater robots. (2021-01-13)

Tapping the brain to boost stroke rehabilitation
Stroke survivors who had ceased to benefit from conventional rehabilitation gained clinically significant arm movement and control by using an external robotic device powered by the patients' own brains. (2021-01-12)

A robotic revolution for urban nature
Drones, robots and autonomous systems can transform the natural world in and around cities for people and wildlife. (2021-01-04)

Wireless, ultra-thin and battery-free strain sensors that are 10 times more sensitive
A research team from NUS Engineering has developed a new range of strain sensors that are 10 times more sensitive when measuring minute movements. These sensors are ultra-thin, battery-free and can transmit data wirelessly, making them attractive for a wide range of applications. (2020-12-15)

Engineers develop soft robotic gripper
Scientists often look to nature for cues when designing robots - some robots mimic human hands while others simulate the actions of octopus arms or inchworms. Now, researchers in the University of Georgia College of Engineering have designed a new soft robotic gripper that draws inspiration from an unusual source: pole beans. (2020-12-15)

"The machine as extension of the body"
Combining neuroscience and robotic research has gained impressive results in the rehabilitation of paraplegic patients. A research team led by Prof. Gordon Cheng from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) was able to show that exoskeleton training not only helped patients to walk, but also stimulated their healing process. With these findings in mind, Prof. Cheng wants to take the fusion of robotics and neuroscience to the next level. (2020-12-11)

Development of the first biohybrid artificial retina built with silk fibroin and retinal cells.
An international research led by the Complutense University of Madrid has taken a further step to solve Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD)-derived blidness problem with the development of the first biohybrid artificial retina built with silk fibroin and retinal cells. (2020-12-11)

Getting the right grip: Designing soft and sensitive robotic fingers
To develop a more human-like robotic gripper, it is necessary to provide sensing capabilities to the fingers. However, conventional sensors compromise the mechanical properties of soft robots. Now, scientists at Ritsumeikan University, Japan, design a 3D printable soft robotic finger containing a built-in sensor with adjustable stiffness. Their work represents a big step toward safer and more dexterous robotic handling, which will extend the applications of robots to fields such as health and elderly care. (2020-12-10)

Robots could replace real therapy dogs
Robotic animals could be the 'pawfect' replacement for our real-life furry friends, a new study published today by the University of Portsmouth has found. (2020-12-10)

This flexible and rechargeable battery is 10 times more powerful than state of the art
A team of researchers has developed a flexible, rechargeable silver oxide-zinc battery with a five to 10 times greater areal energy density than state of the art. The battery also is easier to manufacture; while most flexible batteries need to be manufactured in sterile conditions, under vacuum, this one can be screen printed in normal lab conditions. The device can be used in flexible, stretchable electronics for wearables as well as soft robotics. (2020-12-07)

New process narrows the gap between natural and synthetic materials
Skin and cartilage are both strong and flexible - properties that are hard to replicate in artificial materials. But a new fabrication process, developed by scientists at EPFL, brings lifelike synthetic polymers a step closer. (2020-11-19)

Army, MIT explore materials for transforming robots made of robots
Scientists from the US Army and MIT's Center for Bits and Atoms created a new way to link materials with unique mechanical properties, opening up the possibility of future military robots made of robots. (2020-11-19)

Showing robots how to drive a car...in just a few easy lessons
USC researchers have designed a system that lets robots autonomously learn complicated tasks from a very small number of demonstrations--even imperfect ones. While current state-of-art methods need at least 100 demonstrations to nail a specific task, this new method allows robots to learn from only a handful of demonstrations. (2020-11-19)

Fostering creativity in researchers: how automation can revolutionize materials research
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) devise a system that combines robotics and artificial intelligence to fully automate the routine aspects of synthesizing, testing, and optimizing new materials according to fabrication conditions. Their approach can produce and test compounds ten times faster than scientists doing manual work, allowing for the rapid creation of huge shared databases. In turn, the autonomous system and database will be used to discover exotic material properties and new laws of physics. (2020-11-18)

Machine learning guarantees robots' performance in unknown territory
As engineers increasingly turn to machine learning methods to develop adaptable robots, new work by Princeton University researchers makes progress on safety and performance guarantees for robots operating in novel environments with diverse types of obstacles and constraints. (2020-11-17)

Stretchable fiber optic sensors detect complex deformations simultaneously
A novel dual-core optical fiber made from stretchable materials offers a flexible approach to optomechanical sensing, researchers report. (2020-11-12)

Exoskeleton-assisted walking improves mobility in individuals with spinal cord injury
''Participants showed improvement regardless of level of injury, completeness, or duration of injury,'' noted Dr. Forrest, ''indicating that exoskeletons can be used to improve mobility across a broad spectrum of individuals with neurological deficits caused by spinal cord injury. Our results can be used to guide the application of exoskeletons to spinal cord injury rehabilitation, and the timely acquisition of skills for the safe use of these devices for rehabilitation and community use.'' (2020-11-12)

On the way to lifelike robots
In order for robots to be able to achieve more than simple automated machines in the future, they must not only have their own ''brain''. Empa researchers postulate that artificial intelligence must be expanded to include the capabilities of a Physical Artificial Intelligence, PAI. This will redefine the field of robotics and the relationship between man and machine. (2020-11-11)

Skills development in Physical AI could give birth to lifelike intelligent robots
New research suggests combining educational topics and research disciplines to help researchers breathe life into lifelike intelligent robots. (2020-11-10)

A breakthrough of the mechanism of energy saving in collective swimming
Professor Xie Guangming's group in the College of Engineering at Peking University has found a simple yet previous unknown rule, explaining how do schooling fish save energy in collective motion. (2020-11-03)

Drones that patrol forests could monitor environmental and ecological changes
Imperial researchers have created drones that can attach sensors to trees to monitor environmental and ecological changes in forests. (2020-11-03)

Cockroaches and lizards inspire new robot developed by Ben-Gurion University researcher
'The AmphiSTAR uses a sprawling mechanism inspired by cockroaches, and it is designed to run on water at high speeds like the basilisk lizard,' says Ben-Gurion University Prof. Zarrouk. 'We envision that AmphiSTAR can be used for agricultural, search and rescue and excavation applications, where both crawling and swimming are required.' (2020-11-02)

Robot swarms follow instructions to create art
Controlling a swarm of robots to paint a picture sounds like a difficult task. However, a new technique allows an artist to do just that, without worrying about providing instructions for each robot. Using this method, the artist can assign different colors to specific areas of a canvas, and the robots will work together to paint the canvas. The technique could open up new possibilities in art and other fields. (2020-10-14)

Underwater robots to autonomously dock mid-mission to recharge and transfer data
Robots exploring deep bodies of water can only go so far before needing to recharge and upload data. Purdue University engineers have designed a mobile docking station system that would help them go farther. (2020-10-06)

What is your attitude towards a humanoid robot? Your brain activity can tell us!
Researchers at IIT-Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia in Italy found that people's bias towards robots, that is, attributing them intentionality or considering them as 'mindless things', can be correlated with distinct brain activity patterns. The study has been published in Science Robotics and it is important for understanding the way humans can engage with robots, also considering their acceptance in healthcare applications and daily life. (2020-09-30)

How to bounce back from stretched out stretchable sensors
Elastic can stretch too far and that could be problematic in wearable sensors. A team of researchers at Yokohama National University has proposed a fix to prevent too much stretching while improving the sensing ability of electronics. This could lead to advanced prosthetics or disaster recovery robotics. They published their results on July 29 in the Scientific Reports. (2020-09-24)

Engineers imitate human hands to make better sensors
An international research team has developed ''electronic skin'' sensors capable of mimicking the dynamic process of human motion. This work could help severely injured people, such as soldiers, regain the ability to control their movements, as well as contribute to the development of smart robotics, according to Huanyu ''Larry'' Cheng, Dorothy Quiggle Early Career Professor in the Penn State Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics. (2020-09-21)

You want be a leader? You've got to be fast!
Using state-of-the-art robotics, a research team from the University of Konstanz, Science of Intelligence, and the Leibniz Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) shows that animals' speed is fundamental for collective behavioral patterns, and that ultimately it is the faster individuals that have the strongest influence on group-level behavior. (2020-09-15)

Touch-and-know: Brain activity during tactile stimuli reveals hand preferences in people
Scientists at Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology, Korea, show that it is possible to distinguish between left-handed and right-handed people by noninvasively monitoring just their brain activity during passive tactile stimulation. These results are key in haptic research (the study of sensory systems) and have various important implications for brain-computer interfaces, augmented reality, and even artificial intelligence. (2020-09-14)

New perception metric balances reaction time, accuracy
Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have developed a new metric for evaluating how well self-driving cars respond to changing road conditions and traffic, making it possible for the first time to compare perception systems for both accuracy and reaction time. (2020-09-09)

Researchers report positive results for ReWalk ReStore exosuit in stroke rehabilitation
The trial determined the safety, reliability, and feasibility of the device in this stroke population. 'We found that the ReStore provided targeted assistance for plantarflexion and dorsiflexion of the paretic ankle, improving the gait pattern,' explained Dr. Nolan, senior research scientist in the Center for Mobility and Rehabilitation Engineering Research at Kessler Foundation. 'This is an important first step toward expanding options for rehabilitative care for the millions of individuals with mobility impairments caused by ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke.' (2020-09-09)

New electronic skin can react to pain like human skin
New pain-sensing prototype mimics the body's near-instant feedback response and reacts to painful sensations with the same lighting speed that nerve signals travel to the brain. It's a significant advance towards next-generation biomedical technologies, smart prosthetics and intelligent robotics. (2020-09-01)

An embedded ethics approach for AI development
The increasing use of AI (artificial intelligence) in the development of new medical technologies demands greater attention to ethical aspects. An interdisciplinary team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) advocates the integration of ethics from the very beginning of the development process of new technologies. Alena Buyx, Professor of Ethics in Medicine and Health Technologies, explains the embedded ethics approach. (2020-09-01)

Eye of a fly: Researchers reveal secrets of fly vision for rapid flight control
By examining how fruit flies use eye movements to enhance flight control with a staggeringly fast reaction speed -- about 30 times faster than the blink of an eye -- Penn State researchers have detailed a framework to mimic this ability in robotics. (2020-09-01)

Biomorphic batteries could provide 72x more energy for robots
Like biological fat reserves store energy in animals, a new rechargeable zinc battery integrates into the structure of a robot to provide much more energy, a team led by the University of Michigan has shown. (2020-08-19)

Page 1 of 23 | 910 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.