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Current Robots News and Events, Robots News Articles.
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UCLA engineers develop miniaturized 'warehouse robots' for biotechnology applications
UCLA engineers have developed minuscule warehouse logistics robots that could help expedite and automate medical diagnostic technologies and other applications that move and manipulate tiny drops of fluid. (2020-02-26)
Soft robot fingers gently grasp deep-sea jellyfish
Marine biologists have adopted ''soft robotic linguine fingers'' as tools to conduct their undersea research. (2020-02-24)
Swarming robots avoid collisions, traffic jams
Researchers have developed the first decentralized algorithm with a collision-free, deadlock-free guarantee and validated it on a swarm of 100 autonomous robots in the lab. (2020-02-24)
'Flapping wings' powered by the sun (video)
In ancient Greek mythology, Icarus' wax wings melted when he dared to fly too close to the sun. (2020-02-19)
Getting a grip: An innovative mechanical controller design for robot-assisted surgery
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology designed a new type of controller for the robotic arm used in robotic surgery. (2020-02-18)
Slithering snakes on a 2D plane
Snakes live in diverse environments ranging from unbearably hot deserts to lush tropical forests, where they slither up trees, rocks and shrubbery every day. (2020-02-18)
Factories reimagined
Factories in the future will definitely look different than today. (2020-02-15)
Oceans: particle fragmentation plays a major role in carbon sequestration
A French-British team has just discovered that a little known process regulates the capacity of oceans to sequester carbon dioxide (CO2). (2020-02-13)
The use of jargon kills people's interest in science, politics
When scientists and others use their specialized jargon terms while communicating with the general public, the effects are much worse than just making what they're saying hard to understand. (2020-02-12)
Are robots designed to include the LGBTQ+ community?
Robot technology is flourishing in multiple sectors of society, including the retail, health care, industry and education sectors. (2020-02-12)
Retina-inspired carbon nitride-based photonic synapses for selective detection of UV light
Researchers at Seoul National University and Inha University in South Korea developed photo-sensitive artificial nerves that emulated functions of a retina by using 2-dimensional carbon nitride (C3N4) nanodot materials. (2020-02-04)
Patterns in the brain shed new light on how we function
Patterns of brain connectivity take us a step closer to understanding the key principles of cognition. (2020-01-30)
Robot sweat regulates temperature, key for extreme conditions
Just when it seemed like robots couldn't get any cooler, Cornell University researchers have created a soft robot muscle that can regulate its temperature through sweating. (2020-01-29)
How moon jellyfish get about
With their translucent bells, moon jellyfish (Aurelia aurita) move around the oceans in a very efficient way. (2020-01-23)
Spider-Man-style robotic graspers defy gravity
Traditional methods of vacuum suction and previous vacuum suction devices cannot maintain suction on rough surfaces due to vacuum leakage, which leads to suction failure. (2020-01-17)
'PigeonBot's' feather-level insights push flying bots closer to mimicking birds
Birds fly in a meticulous manner not yet replicable by human-made machines, though two new studies in Science Robotics and Science -- by uncovering more about what gives birds this unparalleled control -- pave the way to flying robots that can maneuver the air as nimbly as birds. (2020-01-16)
Designing better nursing care with robots
Robots are becoming an increasingly important part of human care, according to researchers based in Japan. (2020-01-15)
Robotic gripping mechanism mimics how sea anemones catch prey
Researchers in China demonstrated a robotic gripping mechanism that mimics how a sea anemone catches its prey. (2020-01-14)
Can sea star movement inspire better robots?
What researchers have learned about how a sea star accomplishes movement synchronization, given that it has no brain and a completely decentralized nervous system, might help us design more efficient robotics systems (2020-01-08)
Ten not-to-be-missed PPPL stories from 2019 -- plus a triple bonus!
Arms control robots, a new national facility, and accelerating the drive to bring the fusion energy that powers the stars to Earth: 10 (and a triple bonus!) Must-Read Stories of 2019. (2020-01-02)
Researchers directly measure 'Cheerios effect' forces for the first time
In a finding that could be useful in designing small aquatic robots, researchers have measured the forces that cause small objects to cluster together on the surface of a liquid -- a phenomenon known as the 'Cheerios effect.' (2019-12-19)
Self-driving microrobots
Most synthetic materials, including those in battery electrodes, polymer membranes, and catalysts, degrade over time because they don't have internal repair mechanisms. (2019-12-10)
Navigating navigating land and water
Centipedes not only walk on land but also swim in water. (2019-12-09)
Liquid crystal polymer learns to move and grab objects
A specially conditioned liquid crystal polymer could be controlled with the power of light alone, with new potential applications in soft robotics. (2019-12-04)
Satellite broken? Smart satellites to the rescue
The University of Cincinnati is developing robotic networks that can work independently but collaboratively on a common task. (2019-11-26)
NUS researchers create new metallic material for flexible soft robots
A team from NUS has created a material that is half as light as paper and highly flexible but also shows enhanced characteristics for electrical conductivity, heat generation, fire-resistance, strain-sensing and is inherently capable of wireless communications. (2019-11-24)
New machine learning algorithms offer safety and fairness guarantees
Writing in Science, Thomas and his colleagues Yuriy Brun, Andrew Barto and graduate student Stephen Giguere at UMass Amherst, Bruno Castro da Silva at the Federal University of Rio Grande del Sol, Brazil, and Emma Brunskill at Stanford University this week introduce a new framework for designing machine learning algorithms that make it easier for users of the algorithm to specify safety and fairness constraints. (2019-11-21)
How to design and control robots with stretchy, flexible bodies
MIT researchers have invented a way to efficiently optimize the control and design of soft robots for target tasks, which has traditionally been a monumental undertaking in computation. (2019-11-21)
Scientists help soldiers figure out what robots know
An Army-led research team developed new algorithms and filled in knowledge gaps about how robots contribute to teams and what robots know about their environment and teammates. (2019-11-21)
Soft skin-like robots you can put in your pocket
Stretchable skin-like robots that can be rolled up and put in your pocket have been developed by a University of Bristol team using a new way of embedding artificial muscles and electrical adhesion into soft materials. (2019-11-20)
Trash talk hurts, even when it comes from a robot
Trash talking has a long and colorful history of flustering game opponents, and now researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have demonstrated that discouraging words can be perturbing even when uttered by a robot. (2019-11-19)
Multimaterial 3D printing manufactures complex objects, fast
3D printing is super cool, but it's also super slow -- it would take 115 days to print a detailed, multimaterial object about the size of a grapefruit. (2019-11-13)
New SLAS Technology auto-commentary released
November's SLAS Technology Auto-Commentary, ''On the Way to Efficient Analytical Measurements: The Future of Robot-Based Measurements,'' highlights potentially suitable replacement measurement systems and processes as outlined in the book, Automation Solutions for Analytical Measurements: Concepts and Applications. (2019-11-12)
A 'worker' that flies: Chinese researchers design novel flying robot
Recently, Chinese researchers at the Shenyang Institute of Automation (SIA) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences reported the development of a contact aerial manipulator system that shows high flexibility and strong mission adaptability. (2019-11-08)
Flexible yet sturdy robot is designed to 'grow' like a plant
MIT engineers have developed a robot designed to extend a chain-like appendage flexible enough to twist and turn in any necessary configuration, yet rigid enough to support heavy loads or apply torque to assemble parts in tight spaces. (2019-11-07)
Showing robots 'tough love' helps them succeed, finds new USC study
According to a new study by USC computer scientists, to help a robot succeed, you might need to show it some tough love. (2019-11-06)
Scientists should have sex and gender on the brain
Thinking about sex and gender would help scientists improve their research, a new article published today argues. (2019-11-06)
Learning from mistakes and transferable skills -- the attributes for a worker robot
Practice makes perfect -- it is an adage that has helped humans become highly dexterous and now it is an approach that is being applied to robots. (2019-11-04)
RoboBee powered by soft muscles
Harvard researchers have developed a resilient RoboBee powered by soft artificial muscles that can crash into walls, fall onto the floor, and collide with other RoboBees without being damaged. (2019-11-04)
Technique helps robots find the front door
MIT engineers have developed a navigation method that doesn't require mapping an area in advance. (2019-11-04)
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