Current Rwanda News and Events

Current Rwanda News and Events, Rwanda News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 6 | 209 Results
Ten lessons from the virus crisis
A mixture of smaller countries led by New Zealand, Vietnam, Taiwan, Thailand, Cyprus, Rwanda and Iceland led the world 's Top 10 countries to manage their COVID-19 response well, according to a new study. In the study, published in The BMJ, lead researcher Flinders University's Professor Fran Baum joined experts from around the world to reflect upon the Global Health Security Index (October 2019) predictions for a public health emergency. (2021-02-21)

Pandemic caused 'staggering' economic, human impact in developing counties, research says
The onset of the COVID-19 pandemic last year led to a devastating loss of jobs and income across the global south, threatening hundreds of millions of people with hunger and lost savings and raising an array of risks for children, according to new research co-authored at the University of California, Berkeley. (2021-02-05)

Scientists find Ebola virus antibodies in people before 2018 DRC outbreak
Scientists found antibodies to Ebola virus in people up to a year before the 2018 Ebola virus disease outbreak began in the Eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, or DRC. This suggests that either early cases may have been missed or that exposure occurs more commonly than previously thought, according to a study led by the University of California, Davis. (2020-11-04)

Violent encounters between gorillas slow population growth rate
A new study by the Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund and UC Davis used five decades of data to show how social behavior explains fluctuations in the growth rate of a subpopulation of mountain gorillas. The researchers found that as gorilla group density increases, violent encounters between groups occur more frequently. As a result, infant mortality has increased dramatically, causing the population growth to slow down significantly in recent years. (2020-11-04)

Mountain gorillas are good neighbours - up to a point
Mountain gorilla groups are friendly to familiar neighbours - provided they stay out of ''core'' parts of their territory - new research shows. (2020-10-28)

Former rebel groups become more moderate after gaining political power in nations with democracy, research shows
Former rebel groups who transform into political parties have adopted a moderate stance after gaining power in more democratic political systems, a study shows. (2020-10-26)

Mass screening method could slash COVID-19 testing costs, trial finds
Using a new mathematical approach to screen large groups for COVID-19 could be around 20 times cheaper than individual testing, a study suggests. (2020-10-21)

Covid-19: Pooled testing among recommendations to fix test, trace and isolate system
In a series of recommendations to fix the struggling Covid-19 test, trace and isolate system in England, health researchers from University College London and the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine say that pooled testing for Covid-19 could significantly increase testing capacity in a relatively short space of time and help with the identification of asymptomatic cases in key workers. (2020-10-16)

Advancing the accurate tracking of energy poverty
IIASA researchers have developed a novel measurement framework to track energy poverty that better aligns with the services people lack rather than capturing the mere absence of physical connections to a source of electricity. This alternative framework can aid better tracking of Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 7 by virtue of its simplicity and sensitivity to the diversity in service conditions among the poor. (2020-09-21)

New evaluation of universal health coverage, world will likely fall short of WHO goal
This study uses a new framework to capture how well countries align health services with the needs of the population and how well or poorly those services contribute to people's health. (2020-08-27)

Malaria: Parasite resistance to artemisinin derivatives now affecting Africa
Resistance to artemisinin, the main component of the current antimalarial treatments recommended by WHO, is already widespread in South-East Asia, but it had not previously been described in Africa. Scientists from the Institut Pasteur recently detected the emergence and spread of malaria parasites capable of resisting artemisinin derivatives for the first time in Rwanda. (2020-08-04)

Study calls for reallocation of subsidies for biocontrols to fight fall armyworm
A new CABI-led study is calling for governments to reallocate subsidies to encourage the use of lower risk control options - such as biopesticides - in the fight against the devastating maize pest fall armyworm. The research suggests that the enforcement of pesticide regulations is also needed to curb the use of highly toxic and banned products such as monocrotophos, dichlorvos and methamidophos (2020-06-17)

A diet of high-iron beans improves health of anemic women in Rwanda
A new study involving women of reproductive age in Rwanda, where 19% of that demographic is anemic, showed that a diet including high-iron beans can improve iron status and physical performance relatively quickly. (2020-04-29)

Seductive details inhibit learning
Information that is interesting but irrelevant, or 'seductive details', can be detrimental to learning, according to a meta-analysis of 58 studies by Washington State University researchers. The analysis found that those who learned with seductive details performed lower on learning outcome measures than those who learned without the extraneous information. (2020-03-19)

Using satellites and machine learning to protect food security in Eastern Africa
Dr. Catherine Nakalembe, Africa Program Lead for NASA Harvest, is helping countries there build systems to monitor crops based on NASA's and European Space Agency's free satellite data, allowing them to make life-saving decisions related to food security sooner and with a deeper evidence-base. Speaking at the AAAS meeting in Seattle on Saturday at 8, Convention Center room 611, Nakalembe will describe NASA's involvement in agriculture and new efforts to do crop health assessments using machine learning. (2020-02-15)

General and pediatric 'Treat All' policies lead to increased ART initiation among youth
A new study published in The Journal of Infectious Diseases found that expansion of HIV treatment eligibility to include those under age 15 led to large and significant increases in initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) within 30 days of enrollment in care among 10- to 14-year-olds living with HIV. (2019-12-03)

Global climate change concerns for Africa's Lake Victoria
UH Researcher and team developed a model to project lake levels in world's largest tropical lake (2019-11-14)

Despite progress, only 3 African nations expected to meet global breastfeeding goal
Only three African countries are expected to meet the global target for exclusive breastfeeding, 'an unparalleled source of nutrition for newborns and infants, no matter where they are born,' according to a global health expert. (2019-07-22)

11% of destroyed moist tropical forests could be restored to boost climate, environment
Researchers identified more than 100 million hectares of lost lowland tropical rain forests -- restoration hotspots -- spread out across Central and South America, Africa and Southeast Asia that present the most compelling opportunities for restoration to overcome rising global temperatures, water pollution and shortages, and the extinction of plant and animal life. (2019-07-03)

Field study finds pellet-fed stoves cut air pollutant emissions 90%
A field study finds that a new cookstove design, which makes use of compressed wood pellets, reduces air pollution by about 90% for a range of contaminants associated with health problems and climate change. The findings stem from a Rwanda field study designed to test the performance of the stoves in real-world conditions. (2019-04-30)

Gorillas gather around and groom their dead
It is now known that many animals exhibit unique behaviors around same-species corpses, ranging from removal of the bodies and burial among social insects to quiet attendance and caregiving among elephants and primates. Researchers in Rwanda and Democratic Republic of Congo have been able to take a close look at the behavioral responses to the deaths of three individuals -- both known and unknown -- in gorillas and have reported their findings in PeerJ -- the Journal of Life and Environmental Sciences. (2019-04-03)

When more women make decisions, the environment wins
When more women are involved in group decisions about land management, the group conserves more - particularly when offered financial incentives to do so, according to a new University of Colorado Boulder study published this week in Nature Climate Change. (2019-03-21)

Measuring the success of East African protected areas
East Africa (Burundi, Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania and Uganda) contains 1,776 protected areas (including 186 'strict' protected areas) covering more than 27 percent of its terrestrial area. Researchers at UC Davis have now documented the extent to which this East African protected area network really protects wildlife and habitats. (2019-03-13)

Most countries in sub-Saharan Africa not on track for under-5 mortality reduction goal
The relatively slow pace of neonatal and under-5 mortality reduction could prevent most countries in sub-Saharan Africa from achieving targets set in Sustainable Development Goal 3 (SDG-3) by 2030, according to a study published March 12 in the open-access journal PLOS Medicine by Iván Mejía-Guevara of Stanford University, USA and colleagues. (2019-03-13)

Parental CPTSD increases transmission of trauma to offspring of Tutsi genocide survivors
Nearly 25 years after the genocide against the Tutsi of Rwanda took the lives of up to one million victims, the offspring of Tutsi survivors, who weren't even born at the time, are among those most affected by trauma, according to a new study published by researchers at Bar-Ilan University, in collaboration with a Rwandan therapist and genocide survivor. (2019-01-09)

A quarter of all Holocaust victims were murdered during only three months
The majority of deaths during the single largest murder campaign of the Holocaust, called Operation Reinhard, occurred during a single three-month period, a new study reveals. Not only does this study indicate that the murder rate during Operation Reinhard has previously been greatly underestimated, it also provides new insights into the profound efficiency of Nazi death camps and the systematic manner in which Jewish communities were murdered. (2019-01-02)

Study examines foraging of mountain gorillas for sodium-rich foods
A new Biotropica study examines mountain gorillas in Rwanda and their foraging for sodium-rich food in both national park areas and lands managed by local communities. (2018-09-19)

Newly identified African bird species already in trouble
Central Africa's Albertine Rift region is a biodiversity hotspot consisting of a system of highlands that spans six countries. Recent studies have shown that the population of sooty bush-shrikes occupying the region's mid-elevation forests is a distinct species, and new research from The Condor: Ornithological Applications reveals that this newly discovered species may already be endangered due to pressure from agricultural development. (2018-09-19)

Preventative HIV vaccine candidate triggers desired immune responses in humans and monkeys, and protects monkeys from infection
A team of researchers led by Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center's Dan H. Barouch, M.D., Ph.D., in collaboration with Janssen Vaccines & Prevention and others, evaluated a series of preventative HIV vaccine regimens in uninfected human volunteers. In a similarly designed study, Barouch and colleagues tested the same vaccine for its ability to protect rhesus monkeys challenged with an HIV-like virus from infection. The findings showed the vaccines induced robust and comparable immune responses in humans and monkeys and protected monkeys against infection. (2018-07-06)

Number of wild mountain gorillas exceeds 1,000
A recent census of the critically endangered mountain gorillas conducted in the Virunga Volcanoes found a minimum of 604 individuals. In combination with the 400 individuals living in the only other population in Bwindi Impenetrable National Park, Uganda, these new results push the total number of wild mountain gorillas in the world to over 1000. (2018-05-31)

Hostility towards minorities can be contagious
If people act hostile towards other ethnic groups, they easily find imitators. (2018-05-09)

Hepatitis C: Simplified curative treatments can drive global scale-up
According to a WHO progress report, an estimated 1.5 million people started direct-acting antiviral (DAA) treatment in 2016, compared to around 1 million in 2015.1 Behind the impressive scale-up seen in 2016, a diverse set of countries have been leading the action. (2018-04-14)

Mount Sinai-led task force identifies ways US health care systems can learn from the world
The Task Force report explores how the US can apply global lessons to improve community health. (2018-04-10)

Gastric acid suppressant lansoprazole may target tuberculosis
A cheap and widely used drug, used to treat conditions such as heartburn, gastritis and ulcers, could work against the bacteria that cause tuberculosis (TB), according to new research published in PLOS Medicine, from UCL and the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine. (2017-11-21)

Perpetrators of genocide say they're 'good people'
The men who were tried for their role in the 1994 Rwandan genocide that killed up to 1 million people want you to know that they're actually very good people. That's the most common way accused men try to account for their actions in testimony before the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda, a new study has found. (2017-10-05)

Ecological underpinnings of rural poverty
A first-of-its-kind effort to examine the ecological drivers of rural poverty combines economic, ecological and epidemiological models. The lessons learned could inform interventions to lift people out of poverty. (2017-07-14)

Mountain gorillas have herpes virus similar to that found in humans
Scientists from the University of California, Davis, have detected a herpes virus in wild mountain gorillas that is very similar to the Epstein-Barr virus in humans. (2017-07-13)

Can antipoverty programs work globally? J-PAL offers user's guide
Leaders of MIT's Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab (J-PAL), one of world's foremost centers for antipoverty research, have developed their own formal framework for thinking about this vexing question, over the last several years. Now, in a new article, two J-PAL directors have unveiled the lab's approach. (2017-06-28)

Humanitarian cardiac surgery outreach helps build a better health care system in Rwanda
This year's AATS Centennial, the annual meeting of the American Association for Thoracic Surgery, features a presentation from a team of doctors and other medical professionals who have been travelling to Rwanda for the past 10 years as part of a surgical outreach program aimed at treating patients affected by rheumatic heart disease (RHD) and building a foundation for sustainable cardiothoracic care throughout the country. (2017-05-01)

'Do no harm' vs. 'legitimate use of force'
UdeM bioethicists study whether health professionals in the Canadian Armed Forces can abide by two ethics codes, civilian and military. (2017-03-16)

Page 1 of 6 | 209 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.