Current Salamanders News and Events

Current Salamanders News and Events, Salamanders News Articles.
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All-purpose dinosaur opening reconstructed for first time
For the first time ever, a team of scientists, led by the University of Bristol, have described in detail a dinosaur's cloacal or vent -- the all-purpose opening used for defecation, urination and breeding. (2021-01-19)

Carolina Sandhills Salamander: New species added to species-rich North Carolina
Already possessing more salamander species than any other state in the country with 63, North Carolina has just added one more to make it 64. The aptly named Carolina Sandhills Salamander (Eurycea arenicola) is found in association with springs, seepages and small blackwater streams of the Sandhills region of North Carolina. (2020-12-11)

Beavers may help amphibians threatened by climate change
A study of pond sites in the Cascades found greater amphibian diversity in sites with beaver damns. Red-legged frogs and northwestern salamanders, which develop more slowly, were detected almost exclusively in dammed sites. (2020-12-08)

Bite-size view of brain space
A new study adds another layer to the remarkable evolutionary transition of life from water to land on Earth. The international study of the prehistoric 'relic' tetrapods, including salamander and lobe-finned lungfish and coelacanths, adds another perspective to the evolution of other four-legged land animals, including related animals such as frogs and reptiles which live in both terrestrial and aqueous environments. (2020-11-21)

Earliest example of a rapid-fire tongue found in 'weird and wonderful' extinct amphibians
Fossils of bizarre, armored amphibians known as albanerpetontids provide the oldest evidence of a slingshot-style tongue, a new Science study shows. (2020-11-05)

A species identified in 2016 as an ancient form of chameleon was misidentified at that time, say researchers
A species identified in 2016 as an ancient form of chameleon was misidentified at that time, say researchers, many of whom were part of the original 2016 report. (2020-11-05)

Discovery enables adult skin to regenerate like a newborn's
A newly identified genetic factor allows adult skin to repair itself like the skin of a newborn. The discovery has implications for wound treatment and preventing some of the aging process in skin. Researchers identified a factor in the skin of baby mice controlling hair follicle formation. When it was activated in adult mice, their skin was able to heal wounds without scarring. The reformed skin even included fur and could make goose bumps. (2020-09-29)

Tail regeneration in lungfish provides insight into evolution of limb regrowth
Researchers at UChicago find that the molecular mechanisms underlying tail regeneration in West African lungfish are similar to those seen in amphibians, suggesting the trait evolved in a common ancestor. (2020-09-16)

Dehydration increases amphibian vulnerability to climate change
Amphibians have few options to avoid the underappreciated one-two punch of climate change, according to a new study from Simon Fraser University researchers and others. Rising summer temperatures are also resulting in higher rates of dehydration among wet-skinned amphibians as they attempt to keep themselves cool. (2020-07-15)

Evolution makes the world less ragged
How does evolution impact ecological patterns? It helps smooth out the rough edges, says UConn Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Professor Mark Urban. Urban led an international team of researchers through a review of the history of ecological and evolutionary research to establish a framework to better understand evolution's impact on ecosystem patterns. The research is published as a perspective in the Proceeding of the National Academy of Sciences. (2020-07-09)

'Fang'tastic: researchers report amphibians with snake-like dental glands
Utah State University biologist Edmund 'Butch' Brodie, Jr. and colleagues from Brazil's Butantan Institute describe oral glands in a family of terrestrial caecilians, serpent-like amphibians related to frogs and salamanders. (2020-07-03)

Environmental DNA detection could cut pathogens in pet trade
As the SARS-CoV-2 puts new focus on zoonotic pathogens, a Washington State University researcher has developed a method to use environmental DNA (eDNA) to detect disease in the vast international trade of aquatic animals. (2020-06-24)

Oregon timber harvests don't appear to affect rare salamander, study finds
The Oregon slender salamander only exists on the western slopes of the Cascades, where it lives most of the year underground or burrowed in woody debris on the forest floor. (2020-06-09)

Taking a deep look into animals
Advances in neuroscience research and microscopy: a new technique makes it possible to clear a wide variety of different animals, making them transparent and allowing researchers to look deep into their organs and nervous systems. (2020-05-29)

New information about the transmission of the amphibian pathogen, Bsal
Using existing data from controlled experiments and computer simulations, researchers with the University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture have found that host contact rates and habitat structure affect transmission rates of Bsal among eastern newts, a common salamander species found throughout eastern North America. (2020-04-08)

Plants and animals aren't so different when it comes to climate
A new study reveals that plants and animals are remarkably similar in their responses to changing environmental conditions across the globe, which may help explain how they are distributed today and how they will respond to climate change in the future. (2020-03-24)

Bargain-hunting for biodiversity
The best bargains for conserving some of the world's most vulnerable salamanders and other vertebrate species can be found in Central Texas and the Appalachians, according to new conservation tools developed at the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS) at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. (2020-03-16)

Zoology: Biofluorescence may be widespread among amphibians
Biofluorescence, where organisms emit a fluorescent glow after absorbing light energy, may be widespread in amphibians including salamanders and frogs, according to a study in Scientific Reports. Biofluorescence had previously been observed in only one salamander and three frog species. (2020-02-27)

Naked mole rats migrate above ground with no help from the moon
A new study published in the African Journal of Ecology considers the role of the moon in driving a particularly rare occurrence: the solo journey of a naked mole rat from one underground colony to start a new one. (2020-02-27)

Tadpoles break the tension with bubble-sucking
When it comes to the smallest of creatures, the hydrogen bonds that hold water molecules together to form 'surface tension' lend enough strength to support their mass: think of insects that skip across the surface of water. But what happens to small creatures that dwell below the surface of the water? For tadpoles, they do something called bubble-sucking. (2020-02-26)

A salamander named Egoria: Palaeontologists identify new Jurassic amphibian
A group of Russian and German palaeontologists have described a previously unknown genus and species of prehistoric salamanders. The new amphibian is named Egoria malashichevi -- in honor of Yegor Malashichev a talented scientist and associate professor of the Department of Vertebrate Zoology at St Petersburg University, who passed away at the end of 2018. (2020-02-19)

NUS researchers uncover how fish get their shape
NUS Mechanobiology Institute researchers investigated the science behind the formation of the 'V' patterns -- also known as chevron patterns -- in the swimming muscles of fish. The study focused on the myotome (a group of muscles served by a spinal nerve root) that makes up most of the fish body. The research team found that these patterns do not simply arise from genetic instruction or biochemical pathways but actually require physical forces to correctly develop. (2019-12-22)

Navigating navigating land and water
Centipedes not only walk on land but also swim in water. Researchers at Tohoku University, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne, University of Ottawa, and Hokkaido University with the support of the Human Frontier Science Program have, for the first time, decoded the flexible motor control mechanism underlying amphibious locomotion, or the ability to walk on land and to swim in water, in centipedes. (2019-12-09)

Study shows how salamanders harness limb regeneration to buffer selves from climate change
Clemson University College of Science researchers have shown for the first time that salamanders inhabiting the Southern Appalachian Mountains use temperature rather than humidity as the best cue to anticipate changes in their environment. Significantly, they observed that these salamanders actually harness their unique ability to regenerate limbs to rapidly minimize the impact of hot temperatures. The findings may have implications for other animals and even plants. (2019-09-10)

GIS and eDNA analysis system successfully used to discover new habitats of rare salamander
A research team has successfully identified an unknown population of the endangered Yamato salamander (Hynobius vandenburghi) in Gifu Prefecture, using a methodology combining GIS and eDNA analysis. This method could be applied to other critically endangered species, in addition to being utilized to locate small organisms that are difficult to find using conventional methods. (2019-09-06)

Climate change water variability hurts salamander populations
New research from the University of Montana suggests that streamflow variability brought on by climate change will negatively affect the survival of salamanders. (2019-09-06)

Fish reveal limb-regeneration secrets
What can fish teach scientists about limb regeneration? Quite a bit, as it turns out. In the current issue of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Michigan State University scientists show that gar, a toothy, freshwater fish, can reveal many evolutionary secrets - even possible genetic blueprints for limb regeneration in people. (2019-07-29)

U of G researchers discover meat-eating plant in Ontario, Canada
Pitcher plants growing in wetlands across Canada have long been known to eat creatures -- mostly insects and spiders -- that fall into their bell-shaped leaves and decompose in rainwater collected there. But University of Guelph researchers have discovered the vertebrates, salmanders, are also part of their diet. He said pitcher plants may have become carnivorous to gain nutrients, especially nitrogen, that are lacking in nutrient-poor bog soil. (2019-06-07)

Fungus has decimated the populations of 501 amphibian species worldwide
Survey by researchers in 16 countries is published in Science. Authors say chytrid fungus is responsible for heaviest biodiversity loss ever caused by a single pathogen. (2019-03-28)

Fungal disease threatens hundreds of amphibian species worldwide
A new international study is the first to determine the comprehensive global impact of the deadly fungal disease chytridiomycosis -- and the news is not good. The disease, which eats away at the skin of amphibians such as frogs, toads and salamanders, has caused dramatic population declines in more than 500 amphibian species--including 90 extinctions -- within the past 50 years, according to the findings. (2019-03-28)

House hunting for hellbenders
For young hellbenders, choosing the right home is more than a major life decision. Their survival can depend on it. (2019-03-25)

Salamanders chew with their palate
'According to the textbooks, amphibians swallow their prey whole, but we have been able to refute this,' says Dr. Egon Heiss of the University of Jena. Together with colleagues he has succeeded in proving that the crested newts do actually chew their prey, but in a way that is different from that of most other land-based vertebrates. (2019-03-22)

UK wild newt species free from flesh-eating fungus for now...
The UK's wild newt populations seem to be free from a flesh-eating lethal fungus known to be prevalent in privately-owned amphibians across Western Europe, a nationwide investigation has found. (2019-03-12)

MBL scientists identify gene partnerships that promote spinal cord regeneration
Scientists at the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) have identified gene 'partners' in the axolotl salamander that, when activated, allow the neural tube and associated nerve fibers to functionally regenerate after severe spinal cord damage. Interestingly, these genes are also present in humans, though they are activated in a different manner. Their results are published this week in Nature Communications Biology. (2019-03-06)

Dermal disruption: Amphibian skin bacteria is more diverse in cold, variable environments
Researchers swabbed more than 2300 animals representing 205 amphibian species to better understand the ecology of their skin bacteria. They asked which environmental factors influence the makeup of their microbiomes and how might the makeup of their microbiomes be important to amphibian health and survival? (2019-02-21)

Toward automated animal identification in wildlife research
A new program developed by researchers from Penn State and Microsoft Azure automatically detects regions of interest within images, alleviating a serious bottleneck in processing photos for wildlife research. (2019-02-11)

Researchers discover record-breaking salamander
Researchers at UT have discovered the largest individual of any cave salamander in North America, a 9.3-inch specimen of Berry Cave salamander. The finding was published in Subterranean Biology. (2019-01-25)

Trout, salamander populations quickly bounce back from severe drought conditions
Populations of coastal cutthroat trout and coastal giant salamanders in the Pacific Northwest show the ability to rebound quickly from drought conditions, buying some time against climate change. (2019-01-22)

Central Texas salamanders, including newly identified species, at risk of extinction
Biologists at The University of Texas at Austin have discovered three new species of groundwater salamander in Central Texas, including one living west of Austin that they say is critically endangered. They also determined that an already known salamander species near Georgetown is much more endangered than previously thought. They warn that more severe droughts caused by climate change and increasing water use in Central Texas have left groundwater salamanders 'highly vulnerable to extinction.' (2019-01-14)

Freshwater turtles navigate using the sun
Blanding's turtle hatchlings need only the sun as their compass to guide them on their way to the nearest wetland -- and a place of safety. This is according to John Dean Krenz of Minnesota State University in the US, lead author of a study in Springer's journal Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology. The study focused on how this freshwater turtle, native to the US and Canada, is purposefully able to travel in a relatively straight line once it has hatched. (2018-11-09)

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