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Study sheds light on how people cope with health challenges and medical debt
A recent qualitative study sheds light on how people cope with health and financial challenges, highlighting the important role that communication plays in these coping strategies. (2021-02-16)

Risk factors associated with COVID-19 ICU admission or death in Argentina
A nationwide analysis of data from the first 6 months of the COVID-19 pandemic in Argentina has identified factors associated with increased risk of death or admission to an intensive care unit (ICU) due to the disease, including older age, male sex, coma, seizures, and underlying comorbidities. Daniel Schoenfeld of Centro Diagnostico San Jorge in Puerto Madryn, Argentina, and colleagues present these findings in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on February 11. (2021-02-11)

Examining association between percentage of women in medical specialties, salaries
Salary information from faculty at U.S. medical schools was used to examine the association between the percentage of female clinicians in a medical specialty and the average and median salaries for that specialty. (2021-02-08)

VR simulations shed potential light on goalkeepers' ability to stop free kicks
Virtual reality simulations of football (soccer) free kicks suggests placing a defensive wall can block a goalie's view and hamper their performance - and simulations might be useful in other sports too. (2020-12-23)

Trained dogs might be able to detect people infected with COVID-19 by sniffing their sweat
Trained dogs might be able to detect people infected with COVID-19 by sniffing their sweat, according to a preliminary proof-of-concept study. (2020-12-10)

Satellite-tagged bottles show promise for tracking plastic litter through rivers
A new study demonstrates the potential for plastic bottles tagged with tracking devices to deepen our understanding of how plastic pollution moves through rivers. Emily Duncan of the University of Exeter, U.K., and colleagues present this research in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on Dec 2, 2020. (2020-12-02)

Keyhole wasps may threaten aviation safety
Over a period of 39 months, invasive keyhole wasps (Pachodynerus nasidens) at the Brisbane Airport were responsible for 93 instances of fully blocked replica pitot probes - vital instruments that measure airspeed -- according to a study published November 25 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Alan House of Eco Logical Australia and colleagues. As noted by the authors, the results underscore the importance of risk-mitigating strategies, such as covering pitot probes when aircraft arrive and setting up additional traps to intercept the wasps. (2020-11-25)

Men feel less powerful in their private lives
Men perceive themselves as having less power in their private than in their public lives, a new study from Lund University has suggested. Furthermore, both men and women agree: power in your private life matters more than that in public life. (2020-11-12)

Why cats have 9 lives - high-quality cat genome helps identify novel cause of dwarfism
A new and improved cat genome developed by the feline research teams at the University of Missouri and Texas A&M University has already proven to be a valuable tool for feline biomedical research by helping to confirm existing gene variants and new candidate genes underlying diseases in cats. The new findings are published October 22nd in PLOS Genetics. (2020-10-22)

Electric clothes dryers: An underestimated source of microfiber pollution
Electric clothes dryers (tumble dryers) may be a hitherto unsuspected source of microfibers, widely emitting fibers from laundry into the environment through their vents, according to an experimental study. (2020-10-07)

New ACM study gives most detailed picture to date of US bachelor's programs in computing
ACM, the Association for Computing Machinery, recently released its eighth annual Study of Non-Doctoral Granting Departments in Computing (NDC study). With the aim of providing a comprehensive look at computing education, the study includes information on enrollments, degree completions, faculty demographics, and faculty salaries. (2020-09-10)

Citizens prefer teachers and administrators to take the hit during economic crisis
With schools around the world looking into various cost-cutting measures in the midst of the COVID-10 pandemic, new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York reveals that citizens prefer teachers and administrative staff to be at the frontline of school spending cuts during times of economic crisis. (2020-08-11)

Smartphone accelerometers could help in resistance workouts and rehabilitation protocols
Smartphone accelerometers are effective tools to measure key time-under-tension indicators of muscle training -- and could help in resistance-based workouts and rehabilitation protocols. (2020-07-15)

New estimates highlight global economic and environmental impacts of COVID-19
The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in an estimated global consumption loss of $3.8 trillion, as well as significant job and income loss. However, these socioeconomic effects are accompanied by notable estimated reductions in air pollution. Manfred Lenzen of the University of Sydney, Australia, and colleagues present these findings in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on July 9, 2020. (2020-07-09)

Finding working capital is key to small businesses efforts as reopening accelerates
Small businesses are suffering affer a long pandemic shutdown and they are worried about what will be needed as they begin to reopen. Interviews with a select group of small business owners found that access to working capital is key to reopening, as well as clear guidance from government or trade organizations about how to reopen safely during the pandemic. (2020-05-27)

COVID-19 baby boom? This new study suggests perhaps not
Over 80% of people surveyed in a study do not plan to conceive during the COVID-19 crisis, perhaps putting to rest suggestions that the lockdown could lead to rise in birth numbers. (2020-05-07)

'Bursty' email communication helps groups convert resources into results
A new study looked at more than 1,300 retail banking sales teams in a large regional bank to explore whether groups vary in how they convert resources into performance. The study found that resources are generally helpful, but groups differ in the results they achieve. The variation is also largely associated with the group's coordinated attention - specifically, their patterns of email communication. The findings have implications for how firms can operate more efficiently. (2020-04-23)

Women paid less than men even at highest levels of academic medicine, study finds
Women who chair clinical departments at public medical schools are paid an average of 88 cents for every dollar paid to their male counterparts, or about $70,000 to $80,000 less per year, researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine and UC San Francisco report. (2020-03-02)

Performance and age only partially explain gender pay gap for New Zealand researchers
Over her lifetime, the average female scientific researcher at a New Zealand university earns about NZ$400,000 less than her male counterparts, and less than half of this disparity can be explained by research performance and age. Ann Brower and Alex James of the University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand, present these findings in PLOS ONE on Jan. 22, 2020. (2020-01-22)

Structured, salary-only compensation plan for physicians is a model for pay equity
Gender pay equity in the field of medicine remains elusive. Gender-based pay differences have been shown to persist, even when controlling for experience, clinical productivity, academic rank and other factors. These inequities result in significantly lower lifetime earnings, job burnout and negative attitudes toward work, and adverse effects on the profession and society. (2020-01-02)

Meaningful change in culture urged to save neurology, reduce gender gap
UC Davis School of Medicine dean, NINDS deputy director lead national charge to improve conditions for women in neurology. (2019-12-13)

Ratcheting up NBA rookie salaries may incentivize athletes to finish college
In a paper for the 'International Journal of Sport Finance' Barbara Arel and Michael J. Tomas III, faculty in the business school at the University of Vermont, reimagined the NBA's rookie salary scale to redistribute pay in a way that compensates players for each year of college completed. (2019-12-05)

CEOs' political leanings skew firms' logic in structuring initial pay packa
Newly appointed, conservative CEOs who are naturally more risk averse receive less performance-based pay than those who are more willing to take risks, and more liberal CEOs get more performance-based pay, according to research from Timothy Hubbard. (2019-11-18)

Will college job market continue its decade-long growth?
Despite fears about a recession, the job market is strong for college graduates -- for the 10th consecutive year, according to Michigan State University's Recruiting Trends, the largest annual survey of employers in the nation. (2019-11-05)

Yale study shows class bias in hiring based on few seconds of speech
Candidates at job interviews expect to be evaluated on their experience, conduct, and ideas, but a new study by Yale researchers provides evidence that interviewees are judged based on their social status seconds after they start to speak. (2019-10-21)

Using artificial intelligence to detect discrimination
A new artificial intelligence (AI) tool for detecting unfair discrimination -- such as on the basis of race or gender -- has been created by researchers at Penn State and Columbia University. (2019-07-10)

New study shows gender pay gap is still issue for airline staff
The gender pay gap within airlines is often attributed to the fact that men frequently carry out high technically skilled jobs such as pilots and mechanics, whereas women commonly work in customer service roles like cabin crew. But a new paper by Swansea University researchers has revealed that the gap exists for cabin crew after controlling for contract type. (2019-06-17)

Research finds pregnant women feel pushed out of their jobs
Florida State University researcher Samantha Paustian-Underdahl found pregnant women experienced decreased encouragement in the workplace to return to their jobs after pregnancy. (2019-04-18)

Women dominate ob/gyn field but make less money than male counterparts
While women outnumber men as ob/gyn practitioners, they still make significantly less money and the pay gap extends to subspecialties like reproductive endocrinology and infertility, according to researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. (2019-04-01)

Stop the exploitation of migrant agricultural workers across Italy
Writing in The BMJ today, Dr Claudia Marotta and colleagues say more than 1,500 agricultural workers have died as a result of their work over the past six years, while others have been killed by the so-called 'Caporali' who are modern slave masters. (2019-03-27)

Gender-based salary gap persists among academic emergency medicine physicians
Although overall salaries for emergency physicians have increased over the past four years, and despite a call to end gender disparities in salary, men still make 18 percent more than women, and a $12,000 gender salary gap remains essentially unchanged. (2019-03-11)

Monthly wages are an important step towards economic development
Across developing economies, most workers and agricultural producers are paid are paid on a daily basis. This has a negative impact on their ability to generate savings for large expenses. Researchers from UZH show dairy farmers and agricultural workers prefer to be paid once at the end of the month, rather then daily, because monthly payments schemes are an efficient tool to increase saving. (2019-02-04)

Educated migrants bring wages closer together in regions
Experts from the Higher School of Economics have determined that domestic migration increases the speed at which Russia's regions approach one another in terms of salary levels. Further, the impact of migration on this process depends on migrants' education level. The results of the HSE study were published in the jour-nal Issues in Economics (Voprosy ekonomiki). https://voprecotest.elpub.ru/jour/article/view/1836 (2019-01-31)

Women, your inner circle may be key to gaining leadership roles
According to a new Notre Dame study, women who communicate regularly with a female-dominated inner circle are more likely to attain high-ranking leadership positions. (2019-01-22)

US health care spending highest among developed countries
The United States, on a per capita basis, spends much more on health care than other developed countries; the chief reason is not greater health care utilization, but higher prices, according to a study from a team led by a Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health researcher. (2019-01-07)

The German Bundesliga: Are the players worth the money?
Does the talent of footballers dictate their market value? Economists from Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) investigated this question in a new study. They calculated the relationship between the performance and market value of 493 players in the 1st and 2nd divisions of the German Bundesliga for the 2015/16 season. The study revealed that star players tend to be overvalued, while other players tend to be traded at below market value. (2018-11-29)

'Bargaining while black' may lead to lower salaries
African-American job candidates are more likely to receive lower salaries in hiring negotiations when racially biased evaluators believe they have negotiated too much, according to research published by the American Psychological Association. (2018-11-07)

Does putting the brakes on outrage bottle up social change?
While outrage is often generally considered a hurdle in the path to civil discourse, a team of psychologists suggest outrage -- specifically, moral outrage -- may have beneficial outcomes, such as inspiring people to take part in long-term collective action. (2018-10-23)

Selfish people have fewer children and earn less money
What happens to those who behave unselfishly and make sacrifices for the sake of others? According to an interdisciplinary study by researchers from Stockholm University, the Institute for Futures Studies and the University of South Carolina, unselfish people tend both to have more children and to receive higher salaries, in comparison to more selfish people. The results have now been published in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. (2018-10-17)

Infants capable of complex babble may grow into stronger readers
Infants' early speech production may predict their later literacy, according to a study published Oct. 10, 2018, in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Kelly Farquharson from Florida State University and colleagues. (2018-10-10)

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