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Current Salicylic Acid News and Events, Salicylic Acid News Articles.
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Pollution from cooking remains in atmosphere for longer - study
Particulate emissions from cooking stay in the atmosphere for longer than previously thought, making a prolonged contribution to poor air quality and human health, according to a new study. (2020-12-08)

New treatment in development for irritable bowel syndrome with constipation
Researchers devised a plan to treat IBS with constipation by delivering chenodeoxycholic acid in a bilayered capsule, finding that this mode of delivery could decrease colon cramping and thus produce a better patient experience. (2020-12-08)

Biologists from RUDN University discovered the secret of flaxseed oil with long shelf life
Biologists from RUDN University working together with their colleagues from the Institute of Molecular Biology of the Russian Academy of Sciences and the Institute of Flax studied the genes that determine the fatty acid composition in flaxseed oil and identified polymorphisms in six of them. The team also found out what gene variations could extend the shelf life of flaxseed oil. This data can be used to improve the genetic selection of new flax breeds. (2020-12-04)

The helix of life: New study shows how 'our' RNA stably binds to artificial nucleic acids
Xeno nucleic acids are essential for the development of nucleic acid-based drugs. To be effective, they need to be able to stably bind to natural RNA (a cellular single-stranded version of the DNA, which is essential for all body processes). However, it is unclear how, if at all, RNA hybridizes with these xeno nucleic acids. A new study sheds light on this mechanism, opening doors to the development of potentially revolutionary nucleic acid-based drugs. (2020-12-03)

Amino acid connected to NAFLD could provide treatment clues
Basic science research explores the effects of impaired glycine metabolism in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease - and how to potentially use glycine-based treatment to help people with NAFLD. (2020-12-03)

Plants on aspirin
For centuries humans were using willow barks to treat a headache or an inflamed tooth. Later, the active ingredient, the plant hormone salicylic acid, was used to develop painkillers like Aspirin. But what happens, if plants are treated with these painkillers? By doing so, Scientists at the Institute of Science and Technology (IST) Austria discovered an unexpected bioactivity of human pharmaceuticals in plants. The scientists published their study in the journal Cell Reports. (2020-12-01)

Bacteria in iron-deficient environments process carbon sources selectively
Looking at a group of bacteria from soil, researchers at Northwestern University discovered that these organisms overcome limitation in their carbon processing machinery by rerouting their metabolic pathways to favor producing iron-scavenging compounds. (2020-11-30)

Small molecules control bacterial resistance to antibiotics
Antibiotics have revolutionized medicine by providing effective treatments for infectious diseases such as cholera. But the pathogens that cause disease are increasingly developing resistance to the antibiotics that are most commonly used. Scientists at the Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Germany have discovered a molecule that influences the antibiotic-resistance of cholera bacteria. They have published their results in the scientific journal ''Nature Communications''. (2020-11-27)

Warwick scientists design model to predict cellular drug targets against COVID-19
A computational model of a human lung cell has been used to understand how SARS-CoV-2 draws on human host cell metabolism to reproduce by researchers at the University of Warwick. This study helps understand how the virus uses the host to survive, and enable drug predictions for treating the virus to be made. (2020-11-25)

Scientists age quantum dots in a test tube
Researchers from MIPT and the RAS Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics have proposed a simple and convenient way to obtain arbitrarily sized quantum dots required for physical experiments via chemical aging. (2020-11-19)

The timeless, complimentary taste of oysters and champagne -- explained
Matching prices aren't the only reason oysters and champagne pair so well. According to a study published by the University of Copenhagen today, an uncanny umami synergy makes the combination of yeast-brewed bubbly and fresh molluscs a match made in heaven for some. Ironically, the new knowledge could help us consume more vegetables in the future. (2020-11-18)

The gut microbiota forms a molecule that can contribute to diabetes progression
It is the bacterial changes in the gut that increase the levels of imidazole propionate, the molecule that makes the body's cells resistant to insulin in type 2 diabetes. This result emerges from a European study, MetaCardis. (2020-11-18)

Engineered C. glutamicum strain capable of producing high-level glutaric acid from glucose
A metabolic engineering research group at KAIST has developed an engineered Corynebacterium glutamicum strain capable of producing high-level glutaric acid without byproducts from glucose. This new strategy will be useful for developing engineered microorganisms for the bio-based production of value-added chemicals. (2020-11-16)

Environmentally friendly method could lower costs to recycle lithium-ion batteries
A new process for restoring spent cathodes to mint condition could make it more economical to recycle lithium-ion batteries. The process, developed by nanoengineers at the University of California San Diego, is more environmentally friendly than today's methods; it uses greener ingredients, consumes 80 to 90% less energy, and emits about 75% less greenhouse gases. (2020-11-12)

Researchers at Goethe University create artificial cell organelles for biotechnology
Cells of higher organisms use cell organelles to separate metabolic processes from each other. This is how cell respiration takes place in the mitochondria, the cell's power plants. They can be compared to sealed laboratory rooms in the large factory of the cell. A research team at Goethe University has now succeeded in creating artificial cell organelles and using them for their own devised biochemical reactions. (2020-11-12)

Illuminating tiny proteins in living cells using single-residue labeling tags
SciLifeLab Fellow Simon Elsässer laboratory at Karolinska Institutet reports a method, which allows fluorescent tagging of proteins with the small perturbation -- a single amino acid -- added genetically on either end of a (micro)protein of interest. The method is termed Single-residue Terminal Labeling, STELLA. (2020-11-12)

Chemists studied the composition of oils extracted from popular medicinal plants
A team of Russian and Vietnamese chemists from RUDN University, Belgorod State University, Ton Duc Thang University, and the Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology were the first to study the composition of oils extracted from two flowering plants of the genus Thladiantha that are popular in traditional Chinese medicine. The team confirmed that the seeds of both plants contain around 40% oils rich in unsaturated fatty acids. (2020-11-11)

Steroid injections do not hasten the need for knee replacement
New research shows that corticosteroid injections for knee OA treatment do not hasten a patient's progression to a total knee replacement when compared with hyaluronic acid injections. Details of this study was presented at ACR Convergence, the American College of Rheumatology's annual meeting. (2020-11-06)

Swirl power: how gentle body movement will charge your mobile phone
Scientists have discovered a way to generate electricity from nylon - the stretchy fabric used widely in sportswear and other shape-hugging apparel - raising hopes that the clothes on our backs will become an important source of energy. (2020-11-06)

Blocking energy pathway reduces GVHD while retaining anti-cancer effects of T-cells
MUSC Hollings Cancer Center researchers identified that blocking an alternative energy pathway for T-cells after hematopoietic stem cell transplant helps reduce graft-versus-host disease in an animal model of leukemia. (2020-11-05)

From hard to soft: making sponges from mussel shells
Scientists have discovered a spongy form of calcium carbonate (CaCO3), a material found in limestone, chalk, marble, and the shells of mussels and other shellfish. While most forms of calcium carbonate are hard minerals, this new form is soft and absorbent. The researchers, reporting November 5 in the journal Matter, made the discovery while exploring new uses for leftover mussel shells. (2020-11-05)

Model for acid-tolerant yeast helps guide industrial organic acid production
Microbes and other microscopic organisms could serve as sustainable ''factories'' to create many types of industrial materials because they naturally convert nutrients such as sugars into byproducts. However, creating industrial amounts of organic acids from renewable resources poses a challenge, because not many organisms can grow in highly acidic environments. With the help of gene editing and computational modeling tools, a team of researchers explored one type of yeast that could survive in the harsh environment created by acidic products. (2020-11-04)

Ants swallow their own acid to protect themselves from germs
Ants use their own acid to disinfect themselves and their stomachs. A team from Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) and the University of Bayreuth has found that formic acid kills harmful bacteria in the animal's food, thereby reducing the risk of disease. At the same time, the acid significantly influences the ant's intestinal flora. The new study was published in the journal eLife. (2020-11-03)

ACA's expansion of Medicaid improved maternal health
The period of time before pregnancy is critically important for the health of a woman and her infant, yet not all women have access to health insurance during this time. New research finds that the expansion of Medicaid for many states under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) had a positive impact on a variety of indicators of maternal health prior to conception. (2020-11-02)

Intensive urate lowering reduces urine albumin excretion
Phase 2 trial of verinurad with febuxostat vs. placebo shows 49% reduction in albuminuria (2020-10-29)

Landscape to atomic scales: Researchers apply new approach to pyrite oxidation
Pyrite, or fool's gold, is a common mineral that reacts quickly with oxygen when exposed to water or air, such as during mining operations, and can lead to acid mine drainage. Little is known, however, about the oxidation of pyrite in unmined rock deep underground. (2020-10-29)

Antiseizure medication in pregnancy associated with twice the risk of autism in child
Women with epilepsy who take the antiseizure drug valproic acid while pregnant are at more than double the risk of having children with autism spectrum disorder and nearly double the risk of having children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), according to a study in the October 28, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (2020-10-28)

A study has demonstrated that omega-3 rich foods improve post-heart attack prognosis
A team of researchers from the Germans Trias i Pujol Hospital and Research Institute (IGTP) and the Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute (IMIM) has shown that regularly consuming foods rich in omega-3 fatty acids, from both animal and vegetable origins, strengthens the heart's membranes and helps improve the prognosis in the event of a myocardial infarction. To arrive at these conclusions, they used data from 950 patients. (2020-10-27)

Researchers prove titanate nanotubes composites enhance photocatalysis of hydrogen
In a paper published in NANO, researchers from National Taiwan University examined the photocatalytic performances of titanate nanotubes (TNTs) against commonly-used titanium dioxide (TiO2) and discovered superior performance of TNTs. (2020-10-27)

High-thermoresistant biopolyimides become water-soluble like starch
This is the first report for the syntheses of water-soluble polyimides which are Interestingly derived from bio-based resources, showing high transparency, tunable mechanical strength and the highest thermoresistance in water-soluble polymers reported ever. (2020-10-26)

RUDN University chemist created a catalyst from orange peel for organic compounds production
N-heterocycles are organic substances used in the chemical industry and medicine. To produce them, expensive catalysts made from noble metals are used. A chemist from RUDN University developed a nanocatalyst for N-heterocycles that consists of zinc oxide and niobium and can be obtained using orange peel without any additional chemical agents. The catalyst makes the reaction almost 100% effective, thus increasing the efficiency and reducing the cost of N-heterocycles production. (2020-10-23)

Type 1 diabetes: Tannic acid encapsulation protects transplanted islets from rejection
One therapy for Type 1 diabetes is promising -- transplanting pancreatic islets from cadavers -- but a need for immunosuppression and a reactivated autoimmunity lead to low graft viability and function after five years. Now researchers show that a protective coating of alternating layers of two biopolymers delays allograft and autoimmune-mediated rejection in mouse models of T1D. (2020-10-22)

The highest heat-resistant plastic ever is developed from biomass
The use of biomass-derived plastics is one of the prime concerns to establish a sustainable society, which is incorporated as one of the Sustainable Development Goals. However, the use of most of the biomass-derived plastics is limited due to their low heat resistance. Collaborative research between JAIST and U-Tokyo has successfully developed the white-biotechnological conversion from cellulosic biomass into the aromatic polymers having the highest thermodegradation of all the plastics reported ever. (2020-10-21)

Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS)
Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are industrial chemicals that have been used for decades in several industrial processes and consumer products due to their special technical properties. They are not easily degradable and are now detectable everywhere: in the envi-ronment, in the food chain and in humans. The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) has published an opinion on health risks related to the presence of PFAS in food: http://www.efsa.europa. eu/de/news/pfas-food-efsa-assesses-risks-and-sets-tolerable-intake (2020-10-20)

High fructose intake may drive aggressive behaviors, ADHD, bipolar
New research suggests that conditions such as attention deficit hyperactivity syndrome (ADHD), bipolar disorder, and even aggressive behaviors may be linked with sugar intake, and that it may have an evolutionary basis. (2020-10-16)

AJTMH tip sheet for October 2020
Your advance look at two new studies publishing online on October 15, 2020 in The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. (2020-10-15)

The atomic makeup of M. pneumoniae's 'nap' structure glides into view
Using X-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy, an international team of scientists unravel the atomic structure of the proteins P1 and P40/P90 which make up the ''Nap'' structure - a protein complex that the bacterium M. pneumoniae uses to attach and move around human cells to cause pneumonia. This will allow us to better understand the ''Nap'' structure and develop medicine and vaccines that stop the bacterium from infecting humans. (2020-10-14)

Boost to develop microalgae into health foods
A new discovery may provide the crucial link that helps accelerate development of microalgae into beneficial human health supplements. (2020-10-14)

Scientists develop new precise therapeutic leukemia vaccine
Researchers from the Institute of Process Engineering (IPE) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and Zhujiang Hospital of Southern Medical University have developed a new type of precise therapeutic vaccine against leukemia. It utilizes self-healing polylactic acid microcapsules for co-encapsulating a new epitope peptide and PD-1 antibody. (2020-10-12)

Droughts are threatening global wetlands: new study
University of Adelaide scientists have shown how droughts are threatening the health of wetlands globally. Published in the journal Earth-Science Reviews, the scientists highlight the many physical and chemical changes occurring during droughts that lead to severe, and sometimes irreversible, drying of wetland soils. (2020-10-09)

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