Current Saliva News and Events

Current Saliva News and Events, Saliva News Articles.
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Silencing the alarm
Like a scene from a horror movie, tomato fruitworm caterpillars silence their food plants' cries for help as they devour their leaves. That is the finding of a multidisciplinary team of researchers, who said the results may yield insights into the abilities of crop plants -- such as tomato and soybean -- to withstand additional stressors, like climate change. (2021-02-17)

Lower testosterone during puberty increases the brain's sensitivity to it in adulthood
Young men with lower testosterone levels throughout puberty become more sensitive to how the hormone influences the brain's responses to faces in adulthood, according to new research published in JNeurosci. (2021-02-15)

Scent detection dogs can identify individuals infected with COVID-19
Scent detection dogs can identify individuals infected with the COVID-19 virus according to a new article in the Journal of Osteopathic Medicine. Findings indicate the dogs could be used to screen for infections in hospitals, senior care facilities, schools, universities, airports, large sporting events or concerts. (2021-02-11)

Wearable sensor monitors health, administers drugs using saliva and tears
A new kind of wearable health device would deliver real-time medical data to those with eye or mouth diseases, according to Huanyu 'Larry' Cheng, Dorothy Quiggle Career Development Professor in the Penn State Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics (ESM). (2021-02-01)

UArizona researchers develop smartphone-based COVID-19 test
The team is adapting a smartphone-based method -- originally designed to detect the presence of norovirus -- for COVID-19 testing. (2021-01-29)

Deeper insight into how tick spit suppresses cattle immunity
A tick saliva study reveals immune responses that could lead to better protection for cattle. (2021-01-28)

George Mason University expands testing and tracking behind faculty research
George Mason University announces it is introducing a rapid-result, saliva-based COVID-19 test that will greatly expand testing capabilities on its campuses this spring. The effort, led by Mason's faculty, is part of a comprehensive program to better track and control the virus on campus. Mason scientists, who are pushing the boundaries of technologies that are keeping Mason's campuses safe, are developing an antibody test that can track a body's response to the virus and vaccine. (2021-01-28)

Air purifiers may do more harm than good in confined spaces with airborne viruses
The positions of air inlets and outlets in confined spaces, such as elevators, greatly affect airborne virus transmission. In Physics of Fluids, researchers show air purifiers may actually increase the spread. They use ultraviolet radiation to kill viruses and other microbes, but they also circulate air, sucking it in and exhausting cleaned air. This adds to overall circulation. (2021-01-26)

Esophageal cancer patients show abundance of oral pathogens
DNA from various oral bacterial pathogens has been found in tumors from esophageal cancer patients. Researchers led by Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) examined bacterial pathogens in plaque and saliva from esophageal cancer patients, determining that a prevalence of three species in particular, along with alcohol consumption, is associated with a high risk of esophageal cancer. Screening of oral pathogens could therefore be used for early disease detection. (2021-01-14)

FAU develops simplified COVID-19 diagnostic method to ramp up widespread testing
A simplified COVID-19 testing protocol can detect minimal quantities of the SARS-CoV-2 using samples from the nose and throat as well as saliva and may be useful in testing patients with low viral titers such as asymptomatic patients or testing individuals prior to quarantine release. The high sensitivity method can be used in laboratories with minimal molecular biology equipment and expertise, and enables several patient samples to be pooled, decreasing the number of tests required for larger populations. (2021-01-12)

Research shapes safe dentistry during Covid-19
Leading research at Newcastle University has been used to shape how dentistry can be carried out safely during the Covid-19 pandemic by mitigating the risks of dental aerosols. (2021-01-11)

Levels of stress hormone in saliva of newborn deer fawns may predict mortality
The first-ever study of the levels of the stress hormone cortisol in the saliva of newborn white-tailed deer fawns yielded thought-provoking results that have Penn State researchers suggesting predation is not the only thing in the wild killing fawns. (2021-01-11)

Covid-19: contaminated surfaces as a risk factor
The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic poses a threat to the health of millions of people worldwide. Respiratory viruses, including the pathogen SARS-CoV-2, can be transmitted both via the air and through contact with contaminated objects. Scientists from the Department of Technical and Macromolecular Chemistry at Paderborn University have investigated what promotes the adhesion of viruses to surfaces. This involved examining the proteins that make up the viral envelope. (2020-12-18)

Coronavirus spread during dental procedures could be reduced with slower drill rotation
Researchers from Imperial College London and King's College London have found that careful selection and operation of dental drills can minimise the spread of COVID-19 through aerosols. (2020-12-17)

A saliva-based smartphone platform could rapidly expand COVID-19 testing
Offering an ultrasensitive yet accessible approach to COVID-19 testing, a portable saliva-based smartphone platform provides results within 15 minutes without the resource-intensive laboratory tests the current (2020-12-11)

Self-collected saliva samples prove effective for diagnosing COVID-19
Researchers at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSK) have found that SARS-CoV-2 genetic material can be reliably detected in self-collected saliva samples at a rate similar to that of nasopharyngeal and oropharyngeal swabs. The rate of detection using saliva samples was similar across different testing platforms, and saliva samples remained stable for up to 24 hours when stored with ice packs or at room temperature, according to a new study in The Journal of Molecular Diagnostics. (2020-12-10)

Alterations to oral microbiota reduce the cardiovascular benefits of sport
The researchers note that sports drinks containing sugar, anti-bacterial mouthwashes and the excessive consumption of carbohydrates have a negative effect on oral microbiota and, consequently, on the cardiovascular benefits of sport. (2020-12-09)

Two new studies investigate the early, potent response of IgA antibodies against SARS-CoV-2
A new study of more than 150 COVID-19 patients shows that IgA antibodies dominate the early response to the SARS-CoV-2 virus, coming on more quickly and strongly than IgG and IgM antibodies. (2020-12-07)

Researchers discover how bean plants fend off famished foes
A team led by scientists at the University of Washington and the University of California, San Diego has discovered that cowpeas -- a type of bean plant -- harbor receptors on the surface of their cells that can detect a compound in caterpillar saliva and initiate anti-herbivore defenses. (2020-12-03)

A semiconductor chip detects antigen concentrations at 1 parts per quadrillion molar mass
A chip, which can sense antigens at one part per quadrillion molar mass, was created. Antigens derived from diseases and present in blood and saliva were adhered onto the surface of a flexibly deformable nanosheet. The amount of force generated during the interaction between adhered antigens was then converted into nanosheet deformation information in order to successfully detect specific antigens. This sensor chip allows antigen and antibody tests to be carried out from home. (2020-12-01)

UCF researchers identify features that could make someone a virus super-spreader
In a study in Physics of Fluids, UCF researchers used computer-generated models to numerically simulate sneezes in different types of people and determine associations between people's physiological features and how far their sneeze droplets travel and linger in the air. They found that people's features, like a stopped-up nose or a full set of teeth, could increase their potential to spread viruses by affecting how far droplets travel when they sneeze. (2020-11-19)

Study: How saliva is made
In the TV series, 'How It's Made,' viewers often discover that common objects like pencils or rubber bands are quite complicated to make. The show walks people through complex production processes that lie behind familiar items. A new paper in Cell Reports does the same for saliva, breaking down, in detail, where the multitude of proteins floating in our saliva originate. (2020-11-17)

A patented solution for dry mouth relief and food product development
A team of scientists from the University of Leeds have developed a new hydrogel that has significant potential for oral care products that can help with dry mouth relief. (2020-11-17)

Kids mount a COVID-19 immune response without detection of the SARSCoV- 2 virus
Children in an Australian family developed a COVID-19 immune response after chronic exposure to the SARS-CoV-2 virus from their parents, a new case report has found. (2020-11-17)

New saliva-based antibody test for SARS-CoV-2 highly accurate in initial study
A new saliva-based test developed by a team at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health has been found to accurately detect the presence of antibodies to SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. (2020-11-13)

Study confirms spit testing may help doctors diagnose concussions
Doctors may soon be able to more accurately diagnose concussions by measuring the number of certain molecules in a person's saliva, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers. The results of a recent clinical study confirmed that a patient's spit may be used to aid concussion diagnosis in a non-invasive, non-biased fashion. (2020-11-09)

NYUAD researchers develop protocol for a more accurate COVID-19 testing technique
Researchers from NYU Abu Dhabi's Biology Program and Center for Genomics and Systems Biology (CGSB) have implemented a new three-step testing approach that promises to significantly - and cost-effectively -- improve testing accuracy. (2020-11-09)

Canada should approve HIV self-testing
Canada should integrate self-testing for HIV into the health system to help reduce the burden of the disease, argues a commentary published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) http://www.cmaj.ca/lookup/doi/10.1503/cmaj.201160. (2020-11-02)

Workplace interruptions lead to physical stress
Using an experiment conducted in a simulated group office environment, ETH researchers have proved for the first time that repeated workplace interruptions cause the body to increase the release of stress hormones. And they do so to a higher degree than the perceived psychological stress. (2020-10-28)

Coronavirus antibodies last at least three months after infection, study suggests
Coronavirus antibodies can last at least three months after a person becomes infected with the virus that causes COVID-19, according to a new study published Thursday in Science Immunology. (2020-10-08)

Scientists detect long-lived antibodies in both blood and saliva of patients with COVID-19
Two separate studies have documented the persistence of antibodies that target SARS-CoV-2 in hundreds of patients with COVID-19 at least 3 months after symptom onset. (2020-10-08)

How speech propels pathogens
Speech and singing spread saliva droplets, a phenomenon that has attracted much attention in the current context of the Covid-19 pandemic. Scientists from the CNRS, l'université de Montpellier, and Princeton University sought to shed light on what takes place during conversations. (2020-10-02)

Caltech researcher unveils sensor that rapidly detects COVID-19 infection
Wei Gao has redesigned technology he previously used to detect other health conditions so that it can be used to diagnose a COVID infection. (2020-10-01)

How everyday speech could transmit viral droplets
High-speed imaging of an individual producing common speech sounds shows that the sudden burst of airflow produced from the articulation of consonants like /p/ or /b/ carry salivary and mucus droplets for at least a meter in front of a speaker. (2020-09-29)

COVID-19: Saliva tests could detect silent carriers
Testing self-collected saliva samples could offer an easy and effective mass testing approach for detecting asymptomatic COVID-19. (2020-09-27)

First PhytoFrontiers™ paper discusses arabidopsis response to caterpillars
In their PhytoFrontiers article, Jacquie and colleagues, including first author Zhihong Zhang, who just completed her MSc studies and is interested in the regulation of plant responses to caterpillar herbivory, compare plant responses to two noctuid caterpillar species that are both considered to be ''generalist'' caterpillars. They investigated differences in plant defense responses from phytohormones to gene expression to specialized metabolites. (2020-09-24)

Researchers uncover tools used by predatory bacteria to escape unharmed from prey cell
Predatory bacteria, capable of invading and consuming harmful bugs such as E .coli and Salmonella, use a unique tool to help them escape the cell they have invaded without harming themselves, according to a new study. (2020-09-23)

Evaporation critical to coronavirus transmission as weather changes
As COVID-19 cases continue to rise, it is increasingly urgent to understand how climate impacts the spread of the coronavirus, particularly as winter virus infections are more common and the northern hemisphere will soon see cooler temperatures. In Physics of Fluids, researchers studied the effects of relative humidity, environmental temperature, and wind speed on the respiratory cloud and virus viability. They found a critical factor for the transmission of the infectious particles is evaporation. (2020-09-22)

Oral radiography can reveal chronic coronary artery disease
A study found a link between carotid artery calcification observable in radiographs and coronary artery disease as well as several oral infections. (2020-09-16)

Detecting small amounts of virus in early infections
Diagnostic devices that are used at home or in doctors' offices are often not sensitive enough to detect small amounts of a virus that might be present in samples from asymptomatic patients, which can occur in early stage COVID-19. In Biomicrofluidics, scientists report a membrane-based invention that can concentrate the virus content of a sample of urine or saliva, allowing it to be detected. (2020-09-01)

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