Current Salmonella News and Events

Current Salmonella News and Events, Salmonella News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 18 | 703 Results
Gulls, sentinels of bacteria in the environment
Gulls are one of the main wild birds that act as reservoirs of Campylobacter and Salmonella, two most relevant intestinal antibiotic-resistant bacteria causing gastroenteritis in humans. Therefore, according to an article published in the journal Science of the Total Environment seagulls could act as sentinels of the antibiotic pressure in the environment. (2021-02-10)

NIH scientists study salmonella swimming behavior as clues to infection
Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium bacteria (S. Typhimurium) commonly cause human gastroenteritis, inflammation of the lining of the intestines. The bacteria live inside the gut and can infect the epithelial cells that line its surface. Many studies have shown that Salmonella use a ''run-and-tumble'' method of short swimming periods (runs) punctuated by tumbles when they randomly change direction, but how they move within the gut is not well understood. (2021-01-13)

Killing cancer by unleashing the body's own immune system
The body's immune system is the first line of defense against infections like bacteria, viruses or cancers. Some cancers, however, have developed the art of molecular deception to avoid destruction by the body's immune system. Now, a University of Missouri researcher might have found a new way to help the body's immune system get past that deception and destroy the cancer. (2021-01-12)

With COVID exacerbating superbug threat, researchers ID new weapon
Researchers have discovered a compound capable of pushing through barriers used by Gram-negative bacteria to resist antibiotics, damaging the bugs and preventing them from spreading. (2020-12-23)

Evolution of a killer: How African Salmonella made the leap from gut to bloodstream
University of Liverpool scientists have exploited the combined power of genomics and epidemiology to understand how a type of Salmonella bacteria evolved to kill hundreds of thousands of immunocompromised people in Africa. (2020-12-21)

New salmonella proteins discovered
Only one small protein needs to be missing and salmonellae are no longer infectious. This was discovered in a study in which the pathogens were re-analysed using bioinformatics. (2020-12-16)

Do the benefits of Christmas outweigh its harms?
The Christmas season is associated with preventable harms from cards, tree decorations, and presents, as well as overeating and overdrinking, so do the benefits of Christmas outweigh the harms? In the Christmas issue of The BMJ, Robin Ferner and Jeffrey Aronson dig out some cautionary tales from the archives. (2020-12-16)

Microfluidic system with cell-separating powers may unravel how novel pathogens attack
To develop effective therapeutics against pathogens, scientists need to first uncover how they attack host cells. An efficient way to conduct these investigations on an extensive scale is through high-speed screening tests called assays. (2020-11-30)

Population currently sees coronavirus as the greatest health risk
The coronavirus is currently the population's main concern. More than a quarter of consumers perceive the virus as the greatest health risk. This is a finding of the most recent edition of the Consumer Monitor, a representative population survey by the German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR). (2020-10-20)

New study examines what human physiology can tell us about how animals cope with stress
Research from the University of South Florida offers a novel perspective on how vertebrates may regulate flexibility in coping with stress. (2020-10-14)

"New" lactic acid bacteria can make African camel milk safe
A research project headed by the Technical University of Denmark, DTU, has come up with the formula for a freeze-dried starter culture that African camel milk farmers can use to make safe, fermented milk products. (2020-09-22)

Researchers discover a novel family of toxins used in bacterial competition
Toxic protein inhibits cell wall synthesis in rival bacteria. Discovery helps explain how pathogens cause imbalances in established microbial communities and could pave the way to the development of novel anti-microbial compounds. (2020-09-18)

Typhoid: Study confirms Vi-DT conjugate vaccine is safe and immunogenic in children 6-23 months
A new study conducted by IVI in collaboration with SK bioscience shows that single-dose and two-dose regimens of Vi-DT typhoid conjugate vaccine (TCV) are safe and immunogenic in children 6-23 months of age, a group with high rates of typhoid fever in resource-limited settings. (2020-09-17)

Tiny protein motor fuels bacterial movement
The ability to move is key for bacteria like some strains of salmonella and E. coli to efficiently spread infections. They can propel themselves forward using threads, known as flagella, powered by the flagellar rotary motor. But how this rotary motor is powered has been a mystery among scientists. Now, researchers from UCPH show that the bacterial flagellar motor is powered by yet another even tinier, rotary motor. (2020-09-15)

A new method may make tomatoes safer to eat
When vegetable farmers harvest crops, they often rely on postharvest washing to reduce any foodborne pathogens, but a new University of Georgia study shows promise in reducing these pathogens - as well as lowering labor costs-- by applying sanitizers to produce while it is still in the fields. (2020-09-08)

USDA says current poultry food safety guidelines do not stop salmonella outbreaks
Current poultry food safety guidelines for Salmonella, the leading cause of foodborne illness outbreaks, are inadequate. A new study conducted by Thomas Oscar, USDA Agricultural Research Service, ''Salmonella prevalence alone is not a good indicator of poultry food safety,'' published in Risk Analysis, explores additional factors that must be considered in order to identify poultry products that are truly safe for human consumption. (2020-08-26)

The enemy within: Safeguarding against the spread of intracellular bacteria
Melbourne researchers have revealed the multiple, intertwined cell death systems that prevent the spread of the 'intracellular' bacterium Salmonella, an important cause of typhoid fever which kills more than 100,000 people annually. (2020-07-30)

Salmonella biofilm protein causes autoimmune responses -- Possible link with Alzheimer's
Scientists from the Vaccine and Infectious Disease Organization-International Vaccine Centre (VIDO-InterVac) at the University of Saskatchewan (USask) and Temple University (Philadelphia, US) have demonstrated that a Salmonella biofilm protein can cause autoimmune responses and arthritis in animals. (2020-07-09)

Sneaky salmonella finds a backdoor into plants
Researchers have discovered that bacteria such as salmonella, E.coli and listeria have a backdoor to take advantage of humans' reliance on leafy greens for a healthy diet. They found that wild strains of salmonella are delivering foodborne illnesses by circumventing a plant's immune defense system, getting into the leaves of lettuce by opening up the plant's tiny breathing pores. (2020-06-30)

Reusing chicken litter shows benefits
Beneficial bacteria in reused poultry litter can reduce Salmonella levels. (2020-06-10)

Re-trafficking proteins to fight Salmonella infections
New study demonstrates how monitoring all cellular proteins over time and space can improve our understanding of host-pathogen interactions. (2020-06-09)

Light drives injection
By coupling a bacterial injection system with a light-controlled molecular switch, scientists are able to inject proteins into eukaryontic cells (2020-05-18)

Researchers find one-two punch may help fight against Salmonella
Researchers found that dephostatin does not kill Salmonella or stop it from growing. Instead, dephostatin prevents Salmonella from causing infection in two ways: it blocks its ability to resist being killed by immune cells and it enhances its sensitivity to colistin. (2020-05-14)

Intensive farming increases risk of epidemics, warn scientists
Overuse of antibiotics, high animal numbers and low genetic diversity from intensive farming increase the risk of animal pathogens transferring to humans. (2020-05-04)

New DNA test will improve tracking of Salmonella food-poisoning outbreaks
Researchers report the development of a sensitive and specific assay to detect different serotypes of Salmonella, paving the way for rapid serotyping directly from specimens. This improvement upon current testing methods can play a critical role in quickly tracing the origin of the infection. The report appears in The Journal of Molecular Diagnostics, published by Elsevier. (2020-04-28)

Novel bacterial acid tolerance system sheds light on development of antimicrobials
A research team led by Professors XIAN Mo and ZHAO Guang from the Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology (QIBEBT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) discovered a novel bacterial acid tolerance system, which confers the growth capability to E. coli at pH of 4.2. (2020-03-20)

Food scientists slice time off salmonella identification process
Researchers from Cornell University, the Mars Global Food Safety Center in Beijing, and the University of Georgia have developed a method for completing whole-genome sequencing to determine salmonella serotypes in just two hours and the whole identification process within eight hours. (2020-03-05)

The discovery of ancient Salmonella
Oldest reconstructed bacterial genomes link agriculture and herding with emergence of new disease. (2020-02-25)

Study finds key mechanism for how typhoid bacteria infects
A new study has uncovered key details for how the Salmonella bacteria that causes typhoid fever identifies a host's immune cells and delivers toxins that disrupt the immune system and allow the pathogen to spread. (2020-02-25)

Oldest reconstructed bacterial genomes link farming, herding with emergence of new disease
Using Salmonella enterica genomes recovered from human skeletons as old as 6,500 years, an international team of researchers illustrates the evolution of a human pathogen and provides the first ancient DNA evidence in support of the hypothesis that the cultural transition from foraging to farming facilitated the emergence of human-adapted pathogens that persist until today. (2020-02-24)

Parkinson's and the immune system
Mutations in the Parkin gene are a common cause of hereditary forms of Parkinson's disease. Similar to Parkin, the neighboring Parkin Co-Regulated Gene PACRG regulates a signalling pathway that plays an important role in the innate immune system. This was discovered by a team of researchers led by Professor Konstanze Winklhofer from the Department of Molecular Cell Biology at Ruhr-Universit├Ąt Bochum (RUB). (2020-02-05)

Tailor-made vaccines could almost halve rates of serious bacterial disease
New research has found that rates of disease caused by the bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae could be substantially reduced by changing our approach to vaccination. Researchers from the Wellcome Sanger Institute, Simon Fraser University in Canada and Imperial College London combined genomic data, models of bacterial evolution and predictive modelling to identify how vaccines could be optimised for specific age groups, geographic regions and communities of bacteria. (2020-02-03)

Simple solution to ensure raw egg safety
Salmonella is a key cause of foodborne gastroenteritis around the world, with most outbreaks linked to eggs, poultry meat, pork, beef, dairy, nuts and fresh produce. Now Flinders University researchers have found a simple solution for preventing salmonellosis affecting eggs through surface contamination, giving crucial help for food services industries. (2020-02-02)

Not-so-dirty birds? Not enough evidence to link wild birds to food-borne illness
Despite the perception that wild birds in farm fields can cause food-borne illness, a WSU study has found little evidence linking birds to E. coli, Salmonella and Campylobacter outbreaks. (2020-01-31)

Fighting microbes with microbes
Researchers studying the effects associated to the consumption of antibiotics discover a bacterium that has a super protective effect, able to reduce the risk of acquiring infections. (2020-01-22)

Novel composite antimicrobial film could take a bite out of foodborne illnesses
A novel composite film -- created by the bonding of an antimicrobial layer to conventional, clear polyethylene plastic typically used to vacuum-package foods such as meat and fish -- could help to decrease foodborne illness outbreaks, according to researchers in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences. (2020-01-21)

Do studies underestimate the prevalence of typhoid?
Blood culture surveillance programs are critical for estimating the prevalence of typhoid and paratyphoid fevers, but cases can be missed when patients don't seek medical care, or seek medical care and don't have a blood culture test. Researchers writing in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases have now calculated inflation factors that can be used to adjust these incidence rates to account for under-detection. (2020-01-16)

Researchers discover new strategy in the fight against antibiotic resistance
Bioscience engineers from KU Leuven in Belgium have developed a new antibacterial strategy that weakens bacteria by preventing them from cooperating. Unlike with antibiotics, there is no resistance to this strategy. (2020-01-14)

Scientists examine how a gut infection may produce chronic symptoms
For some unlucky people, a bout of intestinal distress like traveler's diarrhea leads to irritable bowel syndrome. Recent discoveries have given scientists a better idea of how this happens, and potential leads for new treatments. (2020-01-10)

In fighting gut infections, nervous system is key, Yale-Harvard team finds
The peaceful and delicate co-existence of friendly gut bacteria and the immune system relies on highly coordinated information exchange between immune system cells and certain cells lining the intestine. Scaientists at Yale and Harvard medical schools have discovered that, in response to bacterial invaders, nerve cells within the intestine -- and not immune cells or cells lining the intestinal wall -- release infection-fighting cytokines. (2020-01-09)

Page 1 of 18 | 703 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.