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Magnetic pulses alter salmon's orientation, suggesting navigation via magnetite in tissue
Researchers have taken a step closer to solving one of nature's most remarkable mysteries: How do salmon, when it's time to spawn, find their way back from distant ocean locations to the stream where they hatched? (2020-05-02)

Rubies on sapphire: Recipe for making crystals in flux
The effect of the holding temperature and solubility curve of rubies was elucidated, for Al2O3:Cr in MoO3 from 1050 to 1200. (2020-05-01)

Are salt deposits a solution for nuclear waste disposal?
Researchers testing and modeling to dispose of the current supply of waste. (2020-04-29)

Molecular switch plays crucial role in learning from negative experiences
Neurobiologists at KU Leuven have discovered how the signalling molecule Neuromedin U plays a crucial role in our learning process. The protein allows the brain to recall negative memories and, as such, learn from the past. The findings of their study on roundworms have been published in the journal Nature Communications. (2020-04-29)

Scientists use bacteria to help plants grow in salty soil
A new study has shown that salt-tolerant bacteria can be used to enhance salt tolerance in various types of plants. The new approach could increase crop yield in areas dealing with increasing soil salinity. (2020-04-27)

Highly concentrated aqueous electrolytes could replace solvents used in batteries
The review article by researchers at the University of São Paulo shows the advantages of this technological alternative, which is nontoxic and much cheaper than other methods. (2020-04-24)

Researchers use electrostatic charge to assemble particles into materials mimicking gemstones, salt
Using just electrostatic charge, common microparticles can spontaneously organize themselves into highly ordered crystalline materials -- the equivalent of table salt or opals, according to a new study led by New York University chemists and published in Nature. (2020-04-22)

Salt substitution could prevent almost half a million deaths from CVD in China
A nationwide intervention to replace regular household salt with potassium-enriched salt substitutes in China could prevent nearly half a million cardiovascular deaths per year, according to a new modelling study published in the British Medical Journal. (2020-04-22)

A cheap organic steam generator to purify water
A high-efficiency steam generator for the purification and desalination of water can be built using cheap and natural materials such as cellulose. The steam generator has been developed at the Laboratory of Organic Electronics, Linköping University. The results have been published in the journal Advanced Sustainable Systems. (2020-04-20)

Histones and their modifications are crucial for adaptation to cell stress
More than 200 regions (amino acids) in histones are identified as responsible for regulating the response to cell stress. The study reports that histones undergo distinct modifications depending on the type of cell stress. The work by the Cell Signaling laboratory has been published in the journal Nucleic Acids Research. (2020-04-17)

New NUI Galway study helps improve accuracy of future climate change predictions
New research published by NUI Galway's Centre for Climate & Air Pollution Studies (C-CAPS) has shone light on the impact of clouds on climate change. The study has raised serious doubts of the likely impact of human-led interventions involving methods of cloud 'brightening' to counteract climate change. The new study has been published today in the Nature's journal - Climate and Atmospheric Science. (2020-04-08)

Too much salt weakens the immune system
A high-salt diet is not only bad for one's blood pressure, but also for the immune system. This is the conclusion of a study under the leadership of the University Hospital Bonn. Mice fed a high-salt diet were found to suffer from much more severe bacterial infections. Human volunteers who consumed additional six grams of salt per day also showed pronounced immune deficiencies. This amount corresponds to the salt content of two fast food meals. (2020-03-25)

A new low-cost solar technology for environmental cooling
A study conducted by the Politecnico di Torino (Italy), in collaboration with the National Metrological Research Institute (INRiM) and recently published on Science Advances, proposes a new technology for space cooling. No electricity is needed, but rather salty water possibly produced exploiting solar radiation (2020-03-23)

A tale of shepherds and helices
A salt formed due to corrosion on a restored artwork features a structure that is known from the world of biology. (2020-03-16)

New study presents hygroscopic micro/nanolenses along carbon nanotube ion channels
A recent study, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has introduced a novel technology, which allows carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to be easily observed under room temperature. (2020-03-13)

Lower-sodium turkey breast wins sensory test over full-salt option
University of Massachusetts Amherst food scientists produced a lower-salt processed turkey that consumers in a blind sensory test preferred to a full-salt version, according to a study published in the international journal LWT-Food Science and Technology. (2020-03-13)

Single biological factor predicts distinct cortical organizations across mammalian species
Researchers have explained how visual cortexes develop uniquely across the brains of different mammalian species. A KAIST research team led by Professor Se-Bum Paik from the Department of Bio and Brain Engineering has identified a single biological factor, the retino-cortical mapping ratio, that predicts distinct cortical organizations across mammalian species. (2020-03-11)

Lack of information impedes access to food pantries and programs in Utah
Utah residents who have difficulty keeping their families fed could be missing a key ingredient: information. A University of Utah Health study finds that poor communications in at least 22 Utah communities could be hampering efforts to connect those in need with food stamps, food banks, soup kitchens, and other food resources. Researchers say the finding could help refine future community food distribution efforts. (2020-03-09)

Rivers: how they contribute to better understand the Mediterranean Sea dynamics
A new study lead by the CMCC Foundation will provide key information to support and improve the operational ocean forecasts released by Copernicus, develop climate scenarios, and in the future support the design of nature-based solutions to improve environmental resilience and reduce hydro-meteorological risks in Europe. Insights and perspectives from a study on Ocean Modelling lead by the CMCC providing a more realistic representation of estuarine dynamics into ocean models. (2020-03-05)

Researchers link immune system to salt-sensitive hypertension in CKD
Chronic kidney disease (CKD) affects hundreds of millions of people worldwide and is linked to salt-sensitive hypertension. Researchers from Tokyo Medical and Dental University have now found that pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α triggers salt-sensitive hypertension in CKD patients via the WNK-SPAK-NCC pathway by inhibiting transcription of NEDD4-2, an E3 ligase that regulates WNK1 protein abundance. Understanding this mechanism provides new targets for future salt-sensitive hypertension therapies. (2020-03-03)

New technology helps reduce salt, keep flavor
A new processing technology out of Washington State University called microwave assisted thermal sterilization (MATS) could make it possible to reduce sodium while maintaining safety and tastiness. (2020-03-03)

Study shows rapid sea level rise along Atlantic coast of North America in 18th century
Sea levels along a stretch of the Atlantic coast of North America in the 18th century were rising almost as fast as in the 20th century, a new study has revealed. (2020-02-28)

Sugar gets the red light from consumers in new study
Researchers have found that sugar content is the most important factor for people when making healthy food choices -- overriding fat and salt. (2020-02-28)

No benefit found in using broad-spectrum antibiotics as initial pneumonia treatment
Doctors who use drugs that target antibiotic-resistant bacteria as a first-line defense against pneumonia should probably reconsider this approach, according to a new study of more than 88,000 veterans hospitalized with the disease. The study, conducted by University of Utah Health and VA Salt Lake City Health Care System researchers, found that pneumonia patients given these medications in the first days after hospitalization fared no better than those receiving standard medical care for the condition. (2020-02-26)

TRAX air quality study expands
In a new study published in Urban Science, researchers including Daniel Mendoza and Logan Mitchell report the latest from the TRAX Observation Project, including data validation studies that bolster the data's value for other researchers and three case studies from recent events showcasing the abilities of the mobile air quality sensors. (2020-02-26)

Wearable sensor powered by AI predicts worsening heart failure before hospitalization
A new wearable sensor that works in conjunction with artificial intelligence technology could help doctors remotely detect critical changes in heart failure patients days before a health crisis occurs and could prevent hospitalization, according to a study led by University of Utah Health and VA Salt Lake City Health Care System scientists. The researchers say the system could eventually help avert up to one in three heart failure readmissions in the weeks following initial discharge from the hospital and help patients sustain a better quality of life. (2020-02-25)

Road salt harmful to native amphibians, new research shows
The combined effects of chemical contamination by road salt and invasive species can harm native amphibians, according to researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York. (2020-02-17)

Harnessing the sun to bring fresh water to remote or disaster-struck communities
Researchers at the University of Bath have developed a revolutionary desalination process that has the potential to be operated in mobile, solar-powered units. (2020-02-13)

Damaged eye vessels may indicate higher stroke risk for adults with diabetes
Damage to small blood vessels of the eye may be a marker for heightened risk of stroke in people with diabetes. Damage to small blood vessels in the eye may also indicate injury to other blood vessels that can result in stroke or vascular dementia. (2020-02-12)

Free radicals from immune cells are direct cause of salt-sensitive hypertension
In salt-sensitive hypertension, immune cells gather in the kidneys and shoot out free radicals, heightening blood pressure and damaging this pair of vital organs, scientists report. (2020-02-11)

Less advertising for high-calorie snacks on children's TV
The number of overweight children has increased significantly. Some food and beverage companies have signed a voluntary commitment at EU level to restrict advertising of foods high in fat, sugar and salt to children. A study by scientists at the University of Bonn shows: The number of corresponding commercials aimed at children decreased in Germany once this agreement had been put in place, but the companies also exploit loopholes. (2020-02-05)

Can ionic liquids transform chemistry?
Table salt is a commonplace ingredient in the kitchen, but a different kind of salt is at the forefront of chemistry innovation. Low-temperature molten salts known as ionic liquids are said to be 'greener' and safer than traditional solvents. According to an article in Chemical & Engineering News, the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, ionic liquids are on the cusp of transforming how fibers, fuels and other industrial materials are made.  (2020-02-05)

Flushing nitrogen from seawater-based toilets
With about half the world's population living close to the coast, using seawater to flush toilets could be possible with a salt-tolerant bacterium. (2020-02-03)

The salt of the comet
Under the leadership of astrophysicist Kathrin Altwegg, Bernese researchers have found an explanation for why very little nitrogen could previously be accounted for in the nebulous covering of comets: the building block for life predominantly occurs in the form of ammonium salts, the occurrence of which could not previously be measured. The salts may be a further indication that comet impacts may have made life on Earth possible in the first place. (2020-01-20)

How to make it easier to turn plant waste into biofuels
Researchers have developed a new process that could make it much cheaper to produce biofuels such as ethanol from plant waste and reduce reliance on fossil fuels. Their approach, featuring an ammonia-salt based solvent that rapidly turns plant fibers into sugars needed to make ethanol, works well at close to room temperature, unlike conventional processes, according to a Rutgers-led study in the journal Green Chemistry. (2020-01-14)

NASA satellite sees Blake's remnants bringing desert rain to Western Australia
NASA's Aqua satellite provided a look at the remnant clouds and storms associated with Ex-tropical Cyclone Blake as it continues to move through Western Australia and generate rainfall over desert areas. Blake's rainfall has triggered four area flood warnings in some parts of southeastern Western Australia. The remnants have dropped over 10 inches of rain in the Sandy Desert. (2020-01-10)

The effects of microplastics on organisms in coastal areas
Microplastics (plastic particles under 5 mm) are an abundant type of debris found in salt and freshwater environments. In a Limnology & Oceanography Letters study, researchers demonstrated the transfer of microplastics through the food chain between microscopic prey and larval fish that live in coastal ecosystems. (2020-01-08)

Development of ultrathin durable membrane for efficient oil and water separation
Researchers led by Professor MATSUYAMA Hideto and Professor YOSHIOKA Tomohisa at Kobe University's Research Center for Membrane and Film Technology have succeeded in developing an ultrathin membrane with a fouling-resistant silica surface treatment for high performance separation of oil from water. Furthermore, this membrane was shown to be versatile; it was able to separate water from a wide variety of different oily substances. (2019-12-26)

Discovering a new fundamental underwater force
A team of mathematicians from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Brown University has discovered a new phenomenon that generates a fluidic force capable of moving and binding particles immersed in density-layered fluids. (2019-12-20)

Wetlands will keep up with sea level rise to offset climate change
Sediment accrual rates in coastal wetlands will outpace sea level rise, enabling wetlands to increase their capacity to sequester carbon, a study from the Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, shows. (2019-12-19)

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