Current Sandia News and Events

Current Sandia News and Events, Sandia News Articles.
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Super-Earth atmospheres probed at Sandia's Z machine
Sandia National Laboratorie' Z machine has replicated the gravitational pressures on so-called ''super-Earths'' to determine which might maintain atmospheres that could support life. Astronomers believe that super-Earths -- collections of rocks up to eight times larger than Earth -- exist in the millions in our galaxy. ''The question before us is whether any of these super planets are actually Earthlike, with active geological processes, atmospheres and magnetic fields,'' said Sandia physicist Joshua Townsend. The researchers found seven. (2021-02-09)

Can super-Earth interior dynamics set the table for habitability?
New research led by Carnegie's Yingwei Fei provides a framework for understanding the interiors of super-Earths--rocky exoplanets between 1.5 and 2 times the size of our home planet--which is a prerequisite to assess their potential for habitability. Planets of this size are among the most abundant in exoplanetary systems. (2021-02-09)

International research team begins uncovering Arctic mystery
According to 25 international researchers who collaborated on a first-of-its-kind study, frozen land beneath rising sea levels currently traps 60 billion tons of methane and 560 billion tons of organic carbon. Little is known about the frozen sediment and soil -- called submarine permafrost -- even as it slowly thaws and releases methane and carbon that could have significant impacts on climate. (2021-02-09)

UCF researchers use advanced light to reveal how different biofuels behave
Vehicles have evolved to become more efficient and sophisticated, but their fuel hasn't necessarily evolved along with them. The Department of Energy is determined to identify cleaner burning and renewable alternatives to gasoline, and through the work of two UCF researchers, the DOE is one step closer to that goal. (2021-01-12)

Advanced materials in a snap
A research team at Sandia National Laboratories has successfully used machine learning -- computer algorithms that improve themselves by learning patterns in data -- to complete cumbersome materials science calculations more than 40,000 times faster than normal. (2021-01-05)

Material found in house paint may spur technology revolution
The development of a new method to make non-volatile computer memory may have unlocked a problem that has been holding back machine learning and has the potential to revolutionize technologies like voice recognition, image processing and autonomous driving. (2020-10-19)

New approach soft material flow may yield way to new materials, disaster prediction
How does toothpaste stay in its tube and not ooze out when we remove the cap? What causes seemingly solid ground to suddenly break free into a landslide? Defining exactly how soft materials flow and seize has eluded researchers for years, but a new study explains this complex motion using relatively simple experiments. The ability to define - and eventually predict - soft material flow will benefit people dealing with everything from spreadable cheese to avalanches. (2020-08-24)

A breakthrough in developing multi-watt terahertz lasers
Researchers from Lehigh University are reporting another terahertz technology breakthrough: they have developed a new phase-locking technique for plasmonic lasers and, through its use, achieved a record-high power output for terahertz lasers. Their laser produced the highest radiative efficiency for any single-wavelength semiconductor quantum cascade laser. These results are explained in a paper, 'Phase-locked terahertz plasmonic laser array with 2 W output power in a single spectral mode' published yesterday in Optica. (2020-06-11)

Synthetic red blood cells mimic natural ones, and have new abilities
Scientists have tried to develop synthetic red blood cells that mimic the favorable properties of natural ones, such as flexibility, oxygen transport and long circulation times. But so far, most artificial red blood cells have had one or a few, but not all, key features of the natural versions. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Nano have made synthetic red blood cells that have all of the cells' natural abilities, plus a few new ones. (2020-06-03)

Electronics for high-altitude use can get smaller and sturdier with new nanomaterials
Demand is growing for new materials that can be printed at ever smaller dimensions. But materials that work well on Earth don't always hold up well at high altitudes and in space. Scientists are now creating metal-based nanomaterials for circuit boards that could be resistant to high-altitude radiation encountered by aerospace equipment and fighter jets. The researchers are presenting their results through the American Chemical Society SciMeetings online platform. (2020-04-27)

Study reveals unique physical, chemical properties of cicada wings
Biological structures sometimes have unique features that engineers would like to copy. For example, many types of insect wings shed water, kill microbes, reflect light in unusual ways and are self-cleaning. While researchers have dissected the physical characteristics that likely contribute to such traits, a new study reveals that the chemical compounds that coat cicada wings also contribute to their ability to repel water and microbes. (2020-04-14)

Making big data processing more energy efficient using magnetic circuits
New research finds that magnetic wires, spaced a certain way, can lead to a 20-30x reduction in the amount of energy needed to run neural network training algorithms. (2020-04-13)

APS tip sheet: Ultimate strength of metals
A new model is able to accurately determine the peak strength of polycrystalline metals. (2020-03-25)

Impact: 60 years of shock wave research at Sandia National Laboratories
Sandia National Laboratories physicists Mark Boslough and Dave Crawford predicted the Hubble Space Telescope would see a rising vapor plume as the Shoemaker-Levy 9 comet crashed into the far side of Jupiter in 1994. And sure enough, the plume produced by the impact matched Sandia's computational analysis. (2019-10-21)

Sandia experiments at temperature of sun offer solutions to solar model problems
The theoretical model that astrophysicists have used for 40 years to determine the behavior and future of the sun is broken. It seems fixable, however, with information from experiments at Sandia's Z machine, done at the temperature of the sun, that can accurately determine how much energy the sun's components allow to pass through them. (2019-09-11)

What do dragonflies teach us about missile defense?
Research at Sandia National Laboratories is examining whether dragonfly-inspired computing could improve missile defense systems, which have the similar task of intercepting an object in flight, by making on-board computers smaller without sacrificing speed or accuracy. (2019-07-24)

Personalized medicine software vulnerability uncovered by Sandia researchers
A weakness in one common open source software for genomic analysis left DNA-based medical diagnostics vulnerable to cyberattacks. Researchers at Sandia National Laboratories identified the weakness and notified the software developers, who issued a patch to fix the problem. The issue has also been fixed in the latest release of the software, and no attack from this vulnerability is known. (2019-07-02)

New look at old data leads to cleaner engines
New insights about how to understand and ultimately control the chemistry of ignition behavior and pollutant formation have been discovered in research led by Sandia National Laboratories. The discovery eventually will lead to cleaner, more efficient internal combustion engines. (2019-06-10)

Thwarting oil-pipeline corrosion by identifying a nanoscale villain
Certain molecules of iron, when juxtaposed, have been found by Sandia National Labs and Aramco Research Center researchers to cause microscopic holes in steel pipe used for oil transport. This hidden, localized corrosion causes oil pipes to rust unpredictably at rates faster than baselined, interfering with the accuracy of computer models that determine pipe replacement schedules. This problem, which is potentially environmental, may be addressed by changing the microstructure of the steel surface during forging. (2019-06-06)

Stanford researchers' artificial synapse is fast, efficient and durable
A battery-like device could act as an artificial synapse within computing systems intended to imitate the brain's efficiency and ability to learn. (2019-05-03)

Turbocharging the switch to efficient engines
Predicting capricious pre-ignition combustion events could enable automakers to build powerful yet more efficient engines. (2019-03-28)

Sandia spiking tool improves artificially intelligent devices
The aptly named software package Whetstone enables neural computer networks to process information up to 100 times more efficiently than current standards, making possible an increased use of artificial intelligence in mobile phones, self-driving cars, and image interpretation. (2019-02-27)

Engineered light to improve health, food, suggests Sandia researcher in Nature
intentionally controlled light can help regulate human health and productivity by eliciting various hormonal responses. Tailored LED wavelengths and intensities also can efficiently stimulate plant growth, alter their shapes and increase their nutritional value, opening a new world of scientific and technological possibilities for indoor farming. (2019-01-16)

Sandia microneedles technique may mean quicker diagnoses of major illnesses
Microneedles able to draw relatively large amounts of interstitial fluid -- a liquid that lurks just under the skin -- opens new possibilities. Previously, microneedles -- tiny, hollow, stainless steel needles -- have drained tiny amounts of interstitial fluid needed to analyze electrolyte levels but could not draw enough fluid to make more complicated medical tests practical. The new method's larger draws could be more effective in rapidly measuring exposure to chemical and biological warfare agents as well as diagnosing cancer and other diseases. (2019-01-03)

System monitors radiation damage to materials in real-time
A new system allows detailed real-time observations of how materials are affected by a high-radiation environment. The system, developed at MIT and Sandia National Laboratories, could accelerate the development of better materials for nuclear plants. (2018-12-18)

Researchers discover new source of formic acid over Pacific, Indian oceans
Insights from experiments at Sandia National Laboratories designed to push chemical systems far from equilibrium allowed an international group of researchers to discover a new major source of formic acid over the Pacific and Indian oceans. (2018-09-05)

Progress toward plugging an antibiotic pump
Using computer modeling, researchers from Sandia National Laboratories and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign are helping to develop the means to prevent deaths from infections caused by antibiotic resistant bacteria. (2018-08-20)

Most wear-resistant metal alloy in the world engineered at Sandia National Laboratories
Sandia's materials science team has engineered a platinum-gold alloy believed to be the most wear-resistant metal in the world. It's 100 times more durable than high-strength steel, making it the first alloy, or combination of metals, in the same class as diamond and sapphire, nature's most wear-resistant materials. (2018-08-16)

Large supercrystals promise superior sensors
Supercrystals grown from tiny particles of gold have finer sensing capabilities than those commonly used to detect the chemicals in drugs or explosives. (2018-08-01)

Generating electrical power from waste heat
Researchers from Sandia National Laboratories have developed a tiny silicon-based device that can harness what was previously called waste heat and turn it into DC power. Their advance was recently published in Physical Review Applied. (2018-07-09)

Sandia light mixer generates 11 colors simultaneously
A multicolor laser pointer you can use to change the color of the laser with a button click -- similar to a multicolor ballpoint pen -- is one step closer to reality thanks to a new tiny synthetic material made at Sandia National Laboratories. Research on the new light-mixing metamaterial was published in Nature Communications earlier today. (2018-06-28)

Team uses severe deformation method on bulk magnetic alloys for high performance
In a collaborative study involving Equal Channel Angular Extrusion (ECAE), a unique severe plastic deformation (SPD) process, researchers Dr. Ibrahim Karaman from Texas A&M University and Drs. Don Susan and Andrew Kustas of Sandia National Laboratories were able to improve the mechanical properties of magnetic alloys without changing their magnetic properties through microstructural refinement. This process has proven to be troublesome in the past. (2018-06-13)

Riding bacterium to the bank
Jet fuel, pantyhose and plastic soda bottles: all three could be made from bioengineered bacteria, as Sandia National Laboratories has now demonstrated. (2018-05-17)

A powerful laser breakthrough
Lehigh University research team and Sandia National Laboratories develop a simple, effective technique to enhance the power output of single-mode lasers that are 'surface-emitting' (as opposed to those using an 'edge-emitting' configuration). Of the two types, the surface-emitting configuration for semiconductor lasers offers distinctive advantages in how the lasers could be miniaturized, packaged and tested for commercial production. (2018-04-27)

Effects of climate change on communally managed water systems softened by shared effort
Shared fates and experiences in a community can help it withstand changes to water availability due to climate change, a recent study by Sandia National Laboratories researchers found. The work, recently published in a special socio-hydrology issue of Water Resources Research, paired a dynamic systems model of an acequia community and its water system with a hydrology model of an upland water source to study how the community responds to changes in water availability and flow. (2018-04-16)

Biologically inspired membrane purges coal-fired smoke of greenhouse gases
A series of nanoscopic membranes made of water saturated by an enzyme naturally developed over millions of years to clear CO2 empties coal smoke of the greenhouse gas more cheaply and efficiently than any known. (2018-04-11)

Study: Brain stimulation helps younger, not older, adults' memory
A study conducted at the University of Illinois at Chicago found that while the younger adults showed memory improvement from transcranial direct current stimulation, the older adults did not. (2018-02-28)

Bridging tumor moats with potent drug delivery particles
Despite herculean efforts, cancer remains a formidable disease, with each malignant subtype responding differently to therapeutics. One hurdle specific to treating solid tumors is a protective layer called an extracellular matrix that can prevent chemotherapeutic agents from penetrating the tumor's core. Scientists now report results in ACS' Chemistry of Materials showing that, by cloaking anti-cancer drugs in a specially designed particle, they could target and destroy tumor cells deep inside a malignant mass in vitro. (2018-01-10)

Sandia researchers make solid ground toward better lithium-ion battery interfaces
Research at Sandia National Laboratories has identified a major obstacle to advancing solid-state lithium-ion battery performance in small electronics: the flow of lithium ions across battery interfaces. (2017-12-12)

Superior hydrogen catalyst just grows that way
A printing process uses natural forces to grow an inexpensive catalyst to replace platinum to lower the cost of hydrogen-powered cars. (2017-12-05)

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