Current Schizophrenia News and Events

Current Schizophrenia News and Events, Schizophrenia News Articles.
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'Mini brain' organoids grown in lab mature much like infant brains
A new study from UCLA and Stanford University researchers finds that three-dimensional human stem cell-derived 'mini brain' organoids can mature in a manner that is strikingly similar to human brain development. (2021-02-22)

Discovering structural diverseness of neurons between brain areas and between cases
Dr. Masanari Itokawa who is the vice president of Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science and colleague by the collaboration with Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI/SPring-8) and Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory identified that the schizophrenia cases showed a thin and tortuous neuronal network compared with the controls (2021-02-10)

Distinctness of mental disorders traced to differences in gene readouts
A new study suggests that differences in the expression of gene transcripts - readouts copied from DNA that help maintain and build our cells - may hold the key to understanding how mental disorders with shared genetic risk factors result in different patterns of onset, symptoms, course of illness, and treatment responses. Findings from the study, conducted by researchers at the National Institute of Mental Health, part of NIH, appear in the journal Neuropsychopharmacology. (2021-02-08)

Increased risk of dying from COVID for people with severe mental disorders
People with severe mental disorders have a significantly increased risk of dying from COVID-19. This has been shown in a new study from Umeå University and Karolinska Institutet in Sweden. Among the elderly, the proportion of deaths due to COVID-19 was almost fourfold for those with severe mental disorders compared to non-mentally ill people in the same age. (2021-02-03)

Genetic analysis of symptoms yields new insights into PTSD
A new study led by researchers at Yale and the University of California-San Diego (UCSD) uncovers intriguing genetic similarities between PTSD and other mental health disorders such as anxiety, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia. The findings also suggest that existing drugs commonly used for other disorders might be modified to help treat individual symptoms of multiple disorders. (2021-01-28)

Schizophrenia second only to age as greatest risk factor for COVID-19 death
People with schizophrenia, a mental disorder that affects mood and perception of reality, are almost three times more likely to die from the coronavirus than those without the psychiatric illness, a new study shows. Their higher risk, the investigators say, cannot be explained by other factors that often accompany serious mental health disorders, such as higher rates of heart disease, diabetes, and smoking. (2021-01-27)

Association of psychiatric disorders with mortality among patients with COVID-19
In this observational study of about 7,300 adults with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 in a New York health system, a schizophrenia spectrum diagnosis was associated with an increased risk of death after adjusting for demographic and medical risk factors. Mood and anxiety disorders weren't associated with increased risk of mortality. (2021-01-27)

AI used to predict early symptoms of schizophrenia in relatives of patients
University of Alberta researchers have taken a step forward in developing an artificial intelligence tool to predict schizophrenia by analyzing brain scans. In recently published research, the tool was used to analyze functional magnetic resonance images of 57 healthy first-degree relatives (siblings or children) of schizophrenia patients. It accurately identified the 14 individuals who scored highest on a self-reported schizotypal personality trait scale. (2021-01-26)

Increased risk of Parkinson's disease in patients with schizophrenia
A new study conducted at the University of Turku, Finland, shows that patients with a schizophrenia spectrum disorder have an increased risk of Parkinson's disease later in life. The increased risk may be due to alterations in the brain's dopamine system caused by dopamine receptor antagonists or neurobiological effects of schizophrenia. (2021-01-15)

New delivery method promises relief from antipsychotic medication's adverse side effects
A team of neuroscientists and engineers at McMaster University has created a nasal spray to deliver antipsychotic medication directly to the brain instead of having it pass through the body. (2021-01-15)

Large transporter protein linked to schizophrenia
Scientists have suspected mutations in a cellular cholesterol transport protein are associated with psychiatric disorders, but have found it difficult to prove this and to pinpoint how it happens. Now, Kazumitsu Ueda of Kyoto University's Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (iCeMS) and colleagues in Japan have provided evidence that mice with disrupted ABCA13 protein demonstrate a hallmark behaviour of schizophrenia. The team investigated ABCA13's functions and published their findings in the Journal of Biological Chemistry. (2020-12-29)

Maternal Immune Activation Induces Sustained Changes in Fetal Microglia Motility
Researchers at the Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine have revealed that alterations in fetal microglia resulting from maternal inflammation could contribute towards the onset of developmental and psychiatric disorders. These results can help clarify how changes in microglial process motility affect the development of the neural network, thus contributing towards the treatment of these disorders. (2020-12-22)

Gene pathway linked to schizophrenia identified through stem cell engineering
Using human-induced pluripotent stem cells engineered from a single family's blood samples, a gene signaling pathway linked to a higher risk for developing schizophrenia was discovered by scientists at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth). The research was published in a recent issue of Neuropsychopharmacology. (2020-12-21)

Computational model reveals how the brain manages short-term memories
Salk scientists have developed a new computational model showing how the brain maintains information short-term using specific types of neurons. Their findings, published in Nature Neuroscience on December 7, 2020, could help shed light on why working memory is impaired in a broad range of neuropsychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia, as well as in normal aging. (2020-12-17)

Researchers discover brain pattern that could improve mental health disorder diagnosis
A pattern in how the brain breaks down tryptophan, a common amino acid consumed through food, was discovered by researchers at UTHealth. (2020-12-17)

Low-intensity exercise during adolescence may prevent schizophrenia
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba have found that low-intensity exercise, which is associated with improved mental function, has a protective effect against symptoms of schizophrenia in adolescent mice. These findings may facilitate the development of exercise programs to help prevent schizophrenia in humans. (2020-12-16)

Potential means of improving learning and memory in people with mental illnesses
More than a dozen drugs are known to treat symptoms such as hallucinations, erratic behaviors, disordered thinking and emotional extremes associated with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and other severe mental illnesses. But, drug treatments specifically able to target the learning, memory and concentration problems that may accompany such disorders remain elusive. (2020-12-03)

Are we the same person throughout our lives? In essence, yes
Although our body changes and our beliefs and values may vary throughout our lives, our essence remains stable. Research at the Complutense University of Madrid (UCM) has recorded brain activity in a group of individuals showing that our ability to recognise ourselves as distinctive --the ''continuity of the self''-- remains undiminished by change and that it takes us only 250 milliseconds to recognise ourselves. (2020-11-25)

Magnetic brain waves to detect injury and disease
Researchers have designed a new Optically Pumped Magnetometer (OPM) sensor for magnetoencephalography (MEG). The sensor is smaller and more robust in detecting magnetic brain signals and distinguishing them from background noise than existing sensors. Benchmarking tests showed good performance in environmental conditions where other sensors do not work, and it is able to detect brain signals against background magnetic noise, raising the possibility of MEG testing outside a specialised unit. (2020-11-23)

Psychosis symptoms linked to impaired information spread in the brain
Altered white matter limits the brain's conscious access to information, potentially contributing to delusions and other psychotic symptoms of mental health disorders, according to new research published in JNeurosci. (2020-11-23)

Long-acting antipsychotic therapy plus cognitive training show promise for schizophrenia
UCLA scientists and colleagues found the use of long-acting antipsychotic medication combined with the use of cognitive training in group settings led to improved cognition and increased productivity. (2020-11-19)

Parasite infection discovery could assist mental health treatments
New research into how a common parasite infection alters human behaviour could help development of treatments for schizophrenia and other neurological disorders. T. gondii currently infects 2.5 billion people worldwide and causes the disease Toxoplasmosis. (2020-11-16)

Study finds evidence of neurobiological mechanism for hallucinations and delusions
A new study from researchers at Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons has found evidence of a potential neurobiological mechanism for hallucinations and delusions that fits within the hierarchical model of psychosis and can explain their clinical presentation. (2020-11-09)

Unravelling the origins of autoimmune psychosis
Anti-NMDAR encephalitis is an autoimmune brain illness that is often mistaken by a psychiatric disorder since it causes psychoses and other behaviour alterations. Despite having these similarities, the illness does not respond to common antipsychotic treatments. (2020-10-29)

Study reveals role of sleep deprivation in unwanted thoughts
A new study from the University of York offers an important insight into the impact of sleep on mental health (2020-10-20)

New perspectives to treat neuropschychiatric diseases
Researchers studied the major types of neurons of the prefrontal cortex of the brain in an international collaboration. The research team has identified molecular differences in neurons that may support drug development for the treatment of psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia or depression. (2020-10-08)

Computer model explains altered decision making in schizophrenia
Scientists have built a computer 'brain circuit', or artificial neural network, that mirrors human decision-making processes and sheds light on how circuits might be altered in psychiatric diseases. (2020-09-29)

Stanford scientists solve secret of nerve cells marking a form of schizophrenia
A common genetic deletion boosts the risk for schizophrenia by 30-fold. Generating of nerve cells from people with the deletion has showed Stanford researchers why. (2020-09-28)

Hospitals miss mental illness diagnosis in more than a quarter of patients
Severe mental illness diagnoses are missed by clinicians in more than one quarter of cases when people are hospitalised for other conditions, finds a new study led by UCL researchers, published in PLOS Medicine. (2020-09-17)

With digital phenotyping, smartphones may play a role in assessing severe mental illness
Digital phenotyping approaches that collect and analyze Smartphone-user data on locations, activities, and even feelings - combined with machine learning to recognize patterns and make predictions from the data - have emerged as promising tools for monitoring patients with psychosis spectrum illnesses, according to a report in the September/October issue of Harvard Review of Psychiatry. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer. (2020-09-15)

Scientists use blood test to predict who is likely to develop psychotic disorders
Scientists have discovered that testing the levels of certain proteins in blood samples can predict whether a person at risk of psychosis is likely to develop a psychotic disorder years later. (2020-08-26)

One step closer to earlier diagnosis of bipolar disorder and psychoses
In a new study from the Danish psychiatry project iPSYCH, researchers have identified genetic risk factors for developing bipolar disorder and psychoses among people with depression. In the longer term, the results may contribute to ensuring the correct diagnosis is made earlier, so that the patients can receive the correct treatment as quickly as possible. (2020-08-25)

Future mental health care may include diagnosis via brain scan and computer algorithm
Most of modern medicine has physical tests or objective techniques to define much of what ails us. Yet, there is currently no blood or genetic test, or impartial procedure that can definitively diagnose a mental illness, and certainly none to distinguish between different psychiatric disorders with similar symptoms. Experts at the University of Tokyo are combining machine learning with brain imaging tools to redefine the standard for diagnosing mental illnesses. (2020-08-17)

Targeted treatment for depression could benefit patients with psychosis
Patients with early onset psychosis may benefit from treatment for depression, including with anti-depressants alongside other medication, new research shows. (2020-08-17)

Allelic imbalance of chromatin openness is linked to neuropsychiatric disorders
New study finds single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) affect chromatin accessibility, which in turn affects whether or not a gene can be expressed (2020-08-03)

Amygdala changes in male patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder
Researchers in Japan have revealed that DNA methylation occurs in the serotonin transporter gene that regulates neurotransmitter transmission in schizophrenia and bipolar patients. Particularly prominent in males and patients with certain genetic polymorphisms, this methylation is inversely correlated to amygdala volume. This work is expected to lead to a better understanding of the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. It may also help to develop therapeutic agents and diagnostic/therapeutic markers that target epigenetic conditions. (2020-07-09)

Brain activity prior to an action contributes to our sense of control over what we do
Scientists have identified specific brain regions that contribute to humans' sense of agency - the implicit sense that we control our actions and that they affect the outside world. The findings suggest that brain activity involved in planning our next move is crucial to this sense of agency, supporting a 'constructive' hypothesis in which humans compare the predictions. (2020-07-01)

Brain receptor pulls open electrical gate like a puppet master
NMDA receptors convert chemical messages into electrical signals within a neuron. The key to transmitting information is opening the receptor's built-in ion channel, a hollow pore that allows electrically-charged ions to flow. Hiro Furokawa's lab discovered that unlocking the receptor's ion channel is like working a stringed puppet - rock one part of the receptor and filaments pull open the channel's gate. Rock it a little differently, the filaments loosen, and the gate snaps shut. (2020-06-30)

New way to analyze fMRI data offers path to improving treatment for schizophrenia
Researchers at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) have developed tools to improve the analysis of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data. (2020-06-26)

Suicide rate for people with schizophrenia spectrum disorders 170 times higher
The suicide rate for people with schizophrenia spectrum disorders (SSD) is 170 times higher than the general population according a study just published in the journal Schizophrenia Research, a figure the authors call 'tragically high.' (2020-06-18)

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