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Current Schizophrenia News and Events, Schizophrenia News Articles.
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Clues to ageing come to light in vivid snapshots of brain cell links
Striking images of some five billion brain cell connections have been created by scientists, mapping a lifetime's changes across the brain in minute detail. (2020-06-11)

NMDA receptors may link psychosis and sleep deficits
Sofya Kulikova, a researcher at HSE University in Perm, is part of an international research team that has discovered potential mechanisms that explain the sleep spindle deficit in electroencephalograms (EEG) of people with schizophrenia. The article was published in the Schizophrenia Research on June 5. (2020-06-05)

Out-of-sync brain waves may underlie learning deficit linked to schizophrenia
A new UC San Francisco study has pinpointed a specific pattern of brain waves that underlies the ability to let go of old, irrelevant learned associations to make way for new updates. The research is the first to directly show that a particular behavior can be dependent on the precise synchronization of high-frequency brain waves in different parts of the brain, and might open a path for developing interventions for certain psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia. (2020-05-29)

Schizophrenia: When the thalamus misleads the ear
Scientists at the University of Geneva (UNIGE) and the Synapsy National Centre of Competence in Research (NCCR) have succeeded in linking the onset of auditory hallucinations - one of the most common symptoms of schizophrenia - with the abnormal development of certain substructures of a region deep in the brain called the thalamus. The results, published in the journal Biological Psychiatry: CNNI, pave the way for a new understanding of the pathophysiology and treatment of schizophrenia. (2020-05-26)

Emerging evidence on genetics of schizophrenia raises hopes for new treatment targets
In recent years, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified many different genetic variants associated with schizophrenia. These genetic discoveries raise the promise of developing urgently needed new treatments targeting the underlying biology and pathophysiology of schizophrenia, according to a special article in the Journal of Clinical Psychopharmacology. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer. (2020-05-21)

Complement genes add to sex-based vulnerability in lupus and schizophrenia
Variants in a gene of the human immune system cause men and women to have different vulnerabilities to the autoimmune diseases lupus and Sjögren's syndrome, according to findings published in the journal Nature. This extends recent work that showed the gene variants could increase risk for schizophrenia. The gene variants are a member of the complement system, a cascade of proteins that help as an infection defense that promotes inflammation and attacks pathogens. (2020-05-18)

Significant differences exist among neurons expressing dopamine receptors
An international collaboration, which included the involvement of the research team from the Institut de Neurociències of the UAB (INC-UAB), has shown that neurons expressing dopamine D2 receptors have different molecular features and functions, depending on their anatomical localization within the striatum. This research, conducted with mouse models and published in Nature Communications, opens the door to develop better treatments for diseases in which dopamine is altered, such as schizophrenia, addictions and Parkinson's disease. (2020-05-13)

Sex, genes and vulnerability
Study offers molecular explanation for long-standing observation that certain diseases occur more often or more severely in different sexes. Complement component 4 (C4) genes protect against the autoimmune disorders lupus and Sjögren's syndrome while raising risk of severe schizophrenia. (2020-05-11)

Mole-rats' failure to social distance offers clue for treating some neurological disorders
A new study into why African naked mole-rats shun social distancing in favor of crowded sleeping arrangements provides insight into what may be occurring in the brains of people with certain neurological conditions, including autism spectrum disorder, epilepsy, and schizophrenia. The work could point toward useful therapies in treating these disorders. (2020-04-30)

Schizophrenia related to abnormal fatty metabolism in the brain
Researchers at the RIKEN Center for Brian Science (CBS) in Japan have discovered a deficiency in the brains of people with schizophrenia that could lead to the development of new drug therapies. A postmortem comparison published in Schizophrenia Bulletin revealed that schizophrenia was associated with lower than normal levels of S1P, a type of fatty molecule found in the white matter of the brain. (2020-04-28)

New insight into how a genetic change increases the risk of schizophrenia
A genetic change increases the risk of developing schizophrenia and highlights new opportunities for drug treatment say researchers. In the human genome, small sections of DNA have been found to be duplicated (copied) or deleted in a small number of people. For the first time, research has shown that the 16p11.2 duplication impacts on a number of different inhibitory neuron types, neurons that use the neurotransmitter GABA, in brain areas dysfunctional in schizophrenia. (2020-04-21)

Neural circuits mapped: Now we understand vision better
Researchers from Aarhus University have discovered the function of a special group of nerve cells which are found in the eye and which sense visual movement. The findings give us a completely new understanding of how conscious sensory impressions occur in the brain. (2020-04-16)

Whole genome sequencing reveals genetic structural secrets of schizophrenia
UNC School of Medicine scientists have conducted the largest-ever whole genome sequencing study of schizophrenia to provide a more complete picture of the role the human genome plays in this disease. (2020-04-16)

Genes sow seeds of neuropsychiatric diseases before birth, in early childhood
From early prenatal development through childhood, the prefrontal cortex of the human brain undergoes an avalanche of developmental activity. In some cases, it also contains seeds of neuropsychiatric illnesses such as autism spectrum disorder and schizophrenia, according to a new genetic analysis led by researchers at Yale University and the University of California-San Francisco. (2020-04-07)

Addressing unhealthy lifestyles could increase life expectancy of those with severe mental illness
Researchers from King's College London have shown that a combination of approaches that aim to address unhealthy lifestyles, access to healthcare and social issues could reduce the gap in life expectancies by around 28% between those with severe mental illness (SMI) and the general population. (2020-03-27)

A new way to study HIV's impact on the brain
Using a newly developed laboratory model of three types of brain cells, Penn and CHOP scientists reveal how HIV infection -- as well as the drugs that treat it -- can take a toll on the central nervous system. (2020-03-27)

DNA riddle unravelled: How cells access data from 'genetic cotton reels'
With so much genetic information packed in such a tiny space, how cells access DNA when it needs it is something of a mystery. Research published today by Professor Joel Mackay and colleagues has revealed the role played by motor protein CHD4 that allows the DNA to remodel when the information is needed -- and it will help us understand diseases connected to when that process goes wrong. (2020-03-26)

NUI Galway study establishes how cognitive intelligence is a whole brain phenomenon
An international collaborative study led by researchers from the NUI Galway provides findings on the neural basis of intelligence, otherwise known as general cognitive ability (IQ). (2020-03-26)

A molecule that directs neurons
A research team coordinated by the University of Trento studied a mass of brain cells, the habenula, linked to disorders like autism, schizophrenia and depression. The results of their work, published in 'Development', will help find out more about serious brain disorders that can only be treated in ways that take a toll on the quality of life of people. (2020-03-24)

Unlocking schizophrenia
New research, led by Prof. LIU Bing and Prof. JIANG Tianzi from the Institute of Automation of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and their collaborators have recently developed a novel imaging marker that may help in the personalized medicine of psychiatric disorders. (2020-03-23)

Study finds more mental heath visits decreases risk of suicide among youths
A multistate study of Medicaid enrollees led by researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center found that suicide risk was highest among youth with epilepsy, depression, schizophrenia, substance use and bipolar disorder. In addition, the odds of suicide decreased among those who had more mental health visits within the 30 days before the date of suicide. (2020-03-23)

Researchers find key to keep working memory working
Working memory, the ability to hold a thought in mind even through distraction, is the foundation of abstract reasoning and a defining characteristic of the human brain. It is also impaired in disorders such as schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. Now Yale researchers have found a key molecule that helps neurons maintain information in working memory, which could lead to potential treatments for neurocognitive disorders, they report March 19 in the journal Neuron. (2020-03-19)

The inactivated human receptor will help to create effective drugs
Scientists from China and Russia found a new way of searching for new drug candidates by inactivating the molecular structure of the human muscarinic receptor and applying screening to find drugs that it responds to. (2020-03-11)

International study completes the largest genetic map of psychiatric disorders so far
An international study published in the journal Cell, has described 109 genetic variants associated with eight psychiatric disorders: autism, ADHD, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder and Tourette Syndrome, in a total of about 230,000 patients worldwide. (2020-03-09)

Researchers discover a previously unappreciated neurotransmitter system in the brain
Within this system, the transmission of signals between neurons in the brain occurs via the trace amine-associated receptor 5 (TAAR5). The results of the study will allow the development of new types of drugs for depression, schizophrenia and anxiety disorders. (2020-03-05)

Understanding how the brain predicts could make treating autism easier
Our brains make our lives easier by predicting what will happen next based on previous experiences. But what happens when those predictive powers don't work like they should? (2020-03-05)

Scientists find functioning amyloid in healthy brain
The generation of amyloids, a special form of fibrillar proteins, is believed to result in Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases. However, it has been found that in healthy neurons FRX1 protein in amyloid form controls memory and emotion. (2020-03-02)

Anti-psychotic medication linked to adverse change in brain structure
In a first-of-its-kind study using advanced brain imaging techniques, a commonly used anti-psychotic medication was associated with potentially adverse changes in brain structure. This study was the first in humans to evaluate the effects of this type of medication on the brain using a gold-standard design: a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial. The study could have an immediate impact on clinical practice. (2020-02-26)

Researchers discover second type of schizophrenia
In a study of more than 300 patients from three continents, over one third had brains that looked similar to healthy people. (2020-02-26)

Engaging with schizophrenia -- experts argue for new approaches to treatment
A better understanding of the lived experience of people with schizophrenia would enable clinicians to help patients live with their condition, alongside treating symptoms with medication and psychotherapy, say experts at the University of Birmingham. (2020-02-24)

This study shows how a lack of oxygen during pregnancy can cause schizophrenia
Experiments with rats indicate that brain cells submitted to several forms of hypoxia underwent alterations to their energy production mechanism. Such condition may affect the fetus in pregnant women who have developed pre-eclampsia. (2020-02-20)

Unraveling mechanisms of ventricular enlargement linked to schizophrenia
Scientists at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital have implicated two microRNAs in the biological processes that underlie the ventricle enlargement observed in models of schizophrenia. (2020-02-14)

Key modifier identified in large genetic deletion related to neurodevelopmental disorders
Neurodevelopmental disorders, including schizophrenia and autism, likely result from complex interactions that modify the effects of individual genes, according to new research. (2020-02-14)

Circular reasoning
Circular RNA may play a role in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. (2020-02-12)

Early treatment of schizophrenia may not slow disease progression
A Stony Brook University-led study reveals that, despite the common view that early intervention in schizophrenia slows or stops mental decline, those who receive early intervention eventually experience the same declines as those whose treatment started later. (2020-02-12)

Multi-center neuroimaging study offers new insights on schizophrenia
thanks to the pooled data and insights from researchers around the world, USC researchers have the clearest picture yet of brain abnormalities associated with schizophrenia, a serious mental illness that impacts 20 million people worldwide (2020-02-12)

Psychology: High volumes of mental health-related tweets associated with crisis referrals
Referrals to two mental healthcare providers in London for patients requiring urgent help were significantly greater on days with a higher than average number of tweets discussing topics around mental health, according to a study published in Scientific Reports. (2020-02-06)

Schizophrenia genetics analyzed in South African Xhosa
Schizophrenia genetics was studied in the Xhosa population because Africa is the birthplace of all humans, yet ancestral African populations are rarely part of genetics research. Schizophrenia affects about 1% of the world's people and is a leading cause of disability. This study revealed that Xhosa individuals with schizophrenia are significantly more likely to carry rare, damaging genetic mutations compared to Xhosas without severe mental illness. The disrupted genes are likely involved in neuron synapse organization and function. (2020-01-30)

Genetics of schizophrenia in South African Xhosa informs understanding for all human populations
In the first genetic analysis of schizophrenia in an ancestral African population, the South African Xhosa, researchers report that individuals with schizophrenia are more likely to carry rare damaging genetic mutations than those who are well. (2020-01-30)

New clues into the genetic origins of schizophrenia
The first genetic analysis of schizophrenia in an ancestral African population, the South African Xhosa, appears in the Jan. 31 issue of the journal Science. An international group of scientists conducted the research, including investigators from Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health and New York State Psychiatric Institute, as well as the University of Cape Town and the University of Washington. (2020-01-30)

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