Current Scientific Community News and Events

Current Scientific Community News and Events, Scientific Community News Articles.
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Civil engineers find link between hospitals and schools key to community resilience
Health care and education systems are two main pillars of a community's stability. How well and how quickly a community recovers following a natural disaster depends on the resilience of these essential social services. New research published in Nature Scientific Reports has found hospitals and schools are interdependent, suggesting their collective recovery must be considered in order to restore a community in the wake of disaster. (2021-02-05)

An explanation for the lack of blood oxygenation detected in many COVID-19 patients
Researchers at the Seville Institute of Biomedicine (IBIS) describe the presence in the human carotid body, the organ that senses oxygen in the blood, of the protein (ECA2) through which SARS-CoV-2 infects cells. (2020-12-29)

Program reduces social isolation among middle-aged and older adults
An existing service in the North West of England called Community Connectors, which enables adults to access social activities within their community, can help reduce loneliness and social isolation, according to an analysis published in Health & Social Care in the Community. (2020-12-09)

SARS-CoV-2 transmission model offers decision-making pathways for safe school opening
A study in BMC Public Health reports on a new model of SARS-CoV-2 transmission in the school setting that finds if appropriate precautions are followed both in school and in the community, schools can safely remain open or reopen. (2020-11-20)

Accounting for 'research fatigue' in human studies
An article published in Bioethics examines the topic of research fatigue--or psychological and emotional exhaustion both towards and as a result of participating in research. The article is meant to initiate a conversation about research fatigue experienced by marginalized communities and how the research community should respond to it. (2020-11-18)

New primary care tool to prescribe referrals for community health and social services
CommunityRx-H3 is a practice-level, customizable community resource referral system that uses evidence-based algorithms to auto-generate a list of community resources to address such needs. This study evaluated the implementation of CommunityRx-H3 through the perspective of primary care practice facilitators. (2020-11-10)

Academies' report reviews debate on genome editing for crop improvement
Since the ruling of the Court of Justice of the EU of 2018, which placed genome-edited crops under the Genetically Modified Organisms (GMO) legislation, the scientific community has passionately debated the future of these new breeding techniques. The report ''Genome Editing for Crop Improvement'' presents the state of the art of scientific evidence in the field and explores paths to harmonise EU legislation with recent scientific developments, while particularly considering relevant ethical and societal considerations. (2020-10-29)

To avoid impression that SARS-CoV-2 transmission is ever-changing, interpret new info using existing
The global spread of SARS-CoV-2 has taken a variety of forms, ranging from localized and quickly controlled outbreaks to large, ongoing epidemics with deadly consequences. (2020-10-22)

Ecological factors driving microbial community assembly in response to warming
Researchers from the OU Institute for Environmental Genomics and Department of Microbiology and Plant Biology lead a study that aims to better understand ecological community assembly mechanisms in response to climate warming. (2020-09-22)

US adults experienced increased COVID-19-related mental health challenges as the pandemic unfolded
US adults increasingly experienced symptoms associated with acute stress and depression as COVID-19 cases and deaths skyrocketed between mid-March and mid-April 2020, according to a study of more than 6,500 people from three large, nationally representative cohorts. These (2020-09-18)

Analysis of COVID-19 publications identifies research gaps
Since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, scientific and medical journals have published over 100,000 studies on SARS-CoV-2. But according to data scientists who created a machine-learning tool to analyze the deluge of publications, basic lab-based studies on the microbiology of the virus, including research on its pathogenesis and mechanisms of viral transmission, are lacking. Their analysis appears September 16 in the journal Patterns. (2020-09-17)

Veterans undergoing elective PCI at community hospitals may have increased chance of death compared to those treated at VA hospitals
Veterans who underwent elective percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for stable angina at a community facility were at a 33% increased hazard, or chance, of death compared to patients treated within the Veterans Affairs (VA) Healthcare System, according to an analysis of nearly 9,000 veterans published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. (2020-08-24)

Group of international scientists align on a definition for 'synbiotic'
To address the scientific ambiguity around synbiotics, a group of 11 leading international scientists formed a panel to create a consensus definition and to clarify the evidence required to show synbiotics are safe and effective. (2020-08-21)

Community health workers reduce maternal, foetal and new-born deaths, study finds
Large forces of trained community health workers and standardised healthcare systems could reduce the number of maternal, newborn and foetal deaths, a study has recommended. (2020-08-20)

Multi-species bacterial communities bounce back from environmental disturbances
Perturbations in the environment are common, and communities consisting of several species seem to find their way around the crisis. Species immigration is beneficial for community recovery. (2020-08-10)

Researchers urge the scientific community to #StopPandemicBias
While there is little doubt that COVID-19 will have lasting impacts on health and the economy, a group of researchers is bringing attention to the effects the pandemic could have on the careers of scientific researchers. Carnegie Mellon University and Max Planck Institute physicist Ulrike Endesfelder, University of Stuttgart's Dirk Pflüger and Technische Universität Braunschweig's Timo de Wolff launched a Twitter campaign #StopPandemicBias, which aims to bring broader understanding to how COVID-19 will impact scientists (2020-07-28)

Level of media coverage for scientific research linked to number of citations
An analysis of over 800 academic research papers on physical health and exercise suggests that the level of popular media coverage for a given paper is strongly linked to the attention it receives within the scientific community. P. Sage Anderson and colleagues at Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah, report these findings in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on July 1, 2020. (2020-07-01)

Protecting scientific diversity
The COVID-19 pandemic means that scientists face great challenges because they have to reorient, interrupt or even cancel research and teaching. A team of international scientists including the University of Göttingen published an international appeal highlighting the precarious situation of many scientists and calling for a collective effort by the scientific community, especially from its leadership, to protect decades of effort to build an inclusive scientific community. Their letter appeared in Nature Ecology and Evolution. (2020-06-12)

Addressing the ethical considerations of SARS-CoV-2 human challenge trials
While an effective vaccine for the SARS-CoV-2 virus is likely many months away, development could be accelerated by conducting controlled human infection (CHI) studies -- which are increasingly being considered by the scientific community due to the urgent need. (2020-05-07)

Gender bias in commenting poses barriers to women scholars: York University sociologist
Women academics are less likely than men to comment on published research, limiting scholarly debate, a new study co-authored by York University sociologist Professor Cary Wu, shows. According to the study, women are also relatively less likely to comment on their male counterparts, published research. Wu and his co-authors reviewed comments in two major scientific journals for this study. (2020-04-02)

Vision for primate neuroimaging to accelerate scientific and medical breakthroughs
A global community of over 150 scientists studying the primate brain has released a blueprint for developing more complete 'wiring diagrams' of how the brain works that may ultimately improve understanding of many brain disorders. (2020-02-19)

Comparison of primary care in hospital- and community-based practices
Understanding the strengths of each practice type with respect to patient experience may inform future efforts to improve the patient experience overall. (2020-02-18)

Extinction is difficult to prove for Earth's ultra-rare species
A recent study by the University of Kent has called for an increase in scientific surveys and collection of specimens to confirm the extinction of ultra-rare species. Dr. David Roberts, a conservation scientist at Kent's Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology, concluded from research that there is currently insufficient scientific surveys to determine whether many of the Earth's rarest species, those known only from a single specimen, still exist. (2020-02-03)

More Chinese scientists in America are going back home
A growing number of Chinese scientists working in the United States and other parts of the world are returning to their homeland, enhancing China's research productivity. In a new study, researchers found that more than 16,000 researchers have returned to China from other countries since that nation has opened up to international engagement. More than 4,500 left the United States for China in 2017 - nearly double the number who left in 2010. (2019-12-30)

Joint statement from six journals highlights concerns about EPA proposed rule
In a joint journal statement in this issue, the editors-in-chief of six scientific journals (Science, Nature, Cell, PNAS, PLOS and The Lancet) highlight their concerns regarding the 2018 'Strengthening Transparency in Regulatory Science' rule proposed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), which has recently returned to the spotlight following a hearing on evidence in policy-making. (2019-11-26)

Americans maintain high levels of trust in science
A new report analyzing decades of public opinion surveys reveals that the public's trust in scientists has remained stable and high over decades. (2019-11-14)

New study first to reveal growth rates of deep-sea coral communities
Researchers from the University of Hawai'i, Hawai'i Pacific University and NOAA revealed for the first time growth rates of deep-sea coral communities and the pattern of colonization by various species over time scales of centuries to millennia. Age-dated submarine lava flows helped constrain maximum ages of coral communities. (2019-11-08)

Debunking common misperceptions of Asian community health
Common misperceptions about Asian health issues contribute to a lack of health awareness and a reluctance to seek care, according to research published in Public Relations Review. (2019-11-07)

Researcher invents an easy-to-use technique to measure the hydrophobicity of micro- and nanoparticle
The technique may have a far-reaching implication for many scientific and industrial applications and disciplines that involve particulate matter. (2019-10-17)

Growing minority of teachers in Northern Ireland working across sectarian divide
A study by researchers at the University of Ulster has found that more teachers in Northern Ireland than ever before are working across the sectarian divide, with teachers from Catholic communities working in Protestant schools and vice versa. This is especially the case for those working in post-primary schools (age 11+). (2019-10-06)

The hidden ark: How a grassroots initiative can help save fish from extinction
Freshwater fish are the most threatened vertebrate group, and species are disappearing faster than scientists can describe them. A new study shows that aquarium hobbyists can play an important role in freshwater fish conservation by filling in the gaps left by the scientific community and conservation organizations. (2019-10-01)

Diversity of inter-species interactions affects functioning of ecological communities
Mathematical modeling suggests that the diversity of interactions between species in an ecological community plays a greater role in maintaining community functioning than previously thought. Vincent Miele of the CNRS in Lyon, France, and colleagues present these findings in PLOS Computational Biology. (2019-08-29)

A common gut virus that maps our travels
This benign virus changes as we travel, is found in two-thirds of the world's population, and has deep implications for future drug delivery and personalized medicine. (2019-07-08)

Community knowledge can be as valuable as ecological knowledge in environmental decision-making
An understanding of community issues can be as valuable as knowing the ecology of an area when making environmental decisions, according to new research from the University of Exeter Business School. (2019-06-12)

Rapid change in coral reefs prompts global calls for a rethink
Coral reef experts from around the world are calling for an urgent re-evaluation of our climate goals in the light of increasing evidence of unprecedented speed of change to these fragile ecosystems. (2019-06-07)

Taking stock of Indonesia's reef fishes
A research team estimated the natural stock of reef fishes from three regencies in the lesser Sunda-Banda Seascape in Indonesia to fill gaps in knowledge of species composition and biodiversity. (2019-06-06)

University of Idaho study finds scientific reproducibility does not equate to scientific truth
Reproducible scientific results are not always true and true scientific results are not always reproducible, according to a mathematical model produced by University of Idaho researchers. (2019-05-15)

Type 2 diabetes screening in community pharmacies could increase early diagnosis
New research shows that community pharmacies are well placed to screen patients for type 2 diabetes. The study finds that the move could increase early diagnosis and significantly reduce NHS costs. (2019-03-25)

Researchers outline goals for collecting and studying samples from Mars
A new paper published in Meteoritics & Planetary Science describes the results of a major collaboration among 71 scientists from throughout the international science community to define specific scientific objectives for a Mars Sample Return campaign, to describe the critical measurements that would need to be done on returned samples to address the objectives, and to identify the kinds of samples that would be most likely to carry the key information. (2019-03-06)

Old stars live longer than we thought
The type of stars we refer to, which cannot be seen by the naked eye, officially up to now the objects which have suffered the greatest loss of mass. But the spiral structures detected by an international team, including a member who researches at the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC) and at the University of La Laguna (ULL) show that this is not the case. The results of this work are published today in the journal Nature Astronomy. (2019-02-25)

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