Current Scleroderma News and Events

Current Scleroderma News and Events, Scleroderma News Articles.
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New research finds connection: Inflammation, metabolism and scleroderma scarring
Study finds NAD+ break down leads to multi organ scarring, providing now a previously undiscovered pathogenic role of the enzyme CD38 in disease scarring. (2021-01-19)

Polysaccharides from red algae affect mice immune systems, say FEFU scientists
Carrageenans, biologically active polysaccharides isolated from red algae and widely used in the food industry as stabilizers, thickeners, or jelly agents have an express effect on the immune systems of mice, a study reports. The research was carried out by scientists from the School of Biomedicine of Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU), Far Eastern Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, and Vilnius University. A related article appears in the Journal of Biomedical Materials Research. (2020-12-29)

Protein linked to progressive lung scarring in scleroderma patients
Osteopontin is discovered as the culprit behind systemic sclerosis patients' main cause of death: lung fibrosis. However, a repurposed immunosuppressive drug may combat the pro-inflammatory protein. (2020-12-17)

Why long-suffering hosts grow a thick skin
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba have shown that the skin fibrosis seen in chronic graft-versus-host disease is mediated by transforming growth factor-β1 expressed by epidermal cells undergoing programmed death when they are stimulated by interferon-γ. Further investigations elucidate the sclerodermatous changes characteristic of autoimmune and inflammatory conditions such as systemic sclerosis, discoid lupus erythematosus and toxic epidermal necrolysis, thus opening up research avenues in pharmacotherapeutics based on targeting apoptosis and interferon-γ. (2020-12-01)

One step for fibrosis, one giant leap for scleroderma
At the Medical University of South Carolina, a team of researchers has demonstrated a ''moonlighting'' role for lysyl oxidase (LOX) in scleroderma. It was previously known that LOX crosslinked the connective tissue. However, this research showed that, independent of its crosslinking function, LOX plays multiple additional roles in promoting fibrosis in scleroderma, known as ''moonlighting.'' Furthermore, these researchers demonstrated that LOX could be a potential biomarker and target for antifibrotic therapy. (2020-11-16)

Novel educational program puts a human face on biomedical research
The goal of translational research is to speed research breakthroughs into clinical practice. Too often, however, clinicians and biomedical researchers work in silos, with little opportunity for collaboration. With the support of the South Carolina Clinical & Translational Research Institute, an educational initiative at the Medical University of South Carolina is trying to change that by enabling biomedical graduate students to shadow a clinical team as they treat patients with the diseases they are researching. (2020-09-25)

Casting a wider net to catch more cases of pulmonary hypertension
Investigators took an evidence-based approach to determine the lower end of the risk spectrum for PH based on pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR), which is resistance against blood flow from the pulmonary artery to the lungs. (2020-07-28)

Breakthrough science provides hope for disease that affects 1.5 million people in US
Today the prestigious New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) publishes research led by Monash University that offers the first real hope for the treatment of lupus, a disease which affects 1.5 million people in the US and more than 5 million globally, 90% women and for which there is no cure. (2019-12-18)

Severe silicosis found among fabricators of engineered quartz stone
In this week's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, researchers from California, Colorado, Texas and Washington report 18 cases of severe silicosis, and two fatalities, among young, mostly Hispanic men, who worked at engineered stone fabrication plants. (2019-09-26)

Higher estrogen levels linked to more severe disease in scleroderma
Scleroderma is a connective tissue disease that hardens the skin and scars the organs. Older men with scleroderma had higher estrogen levels than healthy older men or postmenopausal women with scleroderma, report Medical University of South Carolina and University of Pittsburgh researchers in Arthritis Research & Therapy. Higher estradiol levels were associated with more severe disease and heart involvement in these men and, in those positive for the autoantibody Scl-70, a greater risk of death. (2019-06-05)

New regulator of immune responses discovered
Scientists have identified a new internal regulator which helps control the body's response to fight infection. The discovery could be a target for new drugs to tackle autoimmune diseases, such as lupus and scleroderma, where healthy tissues are attacked by the body's own immune system. (2019-05-29)

How stressed-out bacteria may trigger autoimmune response
Stressful life events most likely contribute to autoimmune diseases, but scientists don't have a deep understanding of the underlying chain of events. A study on mice published this week in mSystems suggests that the gut microbiota may play a significant role in that connection. Researchers found that the onset of stress caused changes in the intestinal bacteria that, in turn, stimulated the activity of immune cells in a way that increased the likelihood that the body would attack itself. (2019-05-14)

Inhibiting cancer-causing protein could prevent scleroderma fibrosis
Examining the autoimmune disease at the molecular level led researchers to a specific molecule that could be contributing to the disease progression in patients. (2019-02-26)

Potential therapeutic target for lung fibrosis identified
No current treatments reverse or stop lung fibrosis -- scarring of the lung that makes it difficult to breathe. Medical University of South Carolina researchers report they have identified a potential therapeutic target for lung fibrosis. The protein is an attractive target because it exerts its profibrotic influence earlier than other known profibrotic factors and increases their levels. Inhibiting it could also dampen their profibrotic effects. That could potentially help curb disease progression in these patients. (2018-12-19)

Regulatory and effector B cells control scleroderma
A Japan-based research team led by Kanazawa University have found reciprocal regulation of B cells on bleomycin-induced scleroderma model. Their research shed light on the roles of cytokine producing B cells in autoimmune diseases. (2018-08-30)

Light device is effective ulcer treatment
University of Manchester and Salford Royal NHS Trust scientists have developed a lamp which could treat chronic ulcers with light. (2018-07-25)

Why internal scars won't stop growing
A study has newly identified an immune trigger of some fibrotic diseases and an experimental compound to treat it. Fibrosis -- a progressive scarring and hardening of internal organs -- is estimated to cause 35 to 40 percent of deaths in the world. (2018-07-12)

New treatment lenebasum shows promise for diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis (dcSSc)
The results of an open label extension of a phase II study presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2018) demonstrate that lenabasum continues to have acceptable safety and tolerability in diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis (dcSSc) with no severe or serious adverse events (AE). (2018-06-15)

Uncovering a mechanism causing chronic graft-vs-host disease after bone marrow transplant
MicroRNA-17-92 is required for the T-cell and B-cell pathogenicity that drives chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) after allogeneic bone marrow transplant (BMT), report investigators at The Medical University of South Carolina in an article prepublished online March 12, 2018 by Blood. Data from cGVHD mouse models showed that, by determining T-cell and B-cell differentiation and function, miR-17-92 is responsible for cGVHD development. Inhibiting miR-17 is a potential therapeutic strategy for preventing cGVHD in BMT patients. (2018-04-02)

Genomics reveals key macrophages' involvement in systemic sclerosis
A new international study has made an important discovery about the key role of macrophages, a type of immune cell, in systemic sclerosis (SSc), a chronic autoimmune disease which currently has no cure. (2018-01-18)

LJI researchers discover key driver of atopic dermatitis
Severe eczema, also known as atopic dermatitis, is a chronic inflammatory skin condition that is driven by an allergic reaction. In their latest study, researchers at La Jolla Institute reveal an important player that promotes skin inflammation in atopic dermatitis and the characteristic thickening of the skin. (2018-01-16)

Scleroderma study: Hope for a longer life for patients with rare autoimmune disorder
The approach could represent the first new treatment to improve survival in patients with severe scleroderma in more than four decades. (2018-01-12)

New HSS study finds hope in understanding and better treating scleroderma
Researchers at HSS find a potential cause and treatment lead for scleroderma. (2018-01-10)

Study shows stem cell transplant is better than drug therapy for scleroderma
Scleroderma with internal organ involvement is a debilitating and lethal autoimmune disorder with few effective treatments. But a study led by Duke Health researchers has found new cause for optimism using an aggressive stem cell transplant regimen. (2018-01-03)

Stem cell transplant for severe scleroderma improves survival, quality of life
Clinical trial findings show that a regimen involving transplantation of a person's own blood-forming stem cells can improve survival for people with severe scleroderma, a life-threatening autoimmune disease. Myeloablative autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) includes chemotherapy and radiation to destroy the bone marrow then transplanting the person's own blood-forming stem cells to reconstitute the marrow and immune system. The NIH-funded study found myeloablative HSCT to be superior to treatment with the immune-suppressing drug cyclophosphamide. (2018-01-03)

Study shows increased risk of uterine fibroids in African-American women with a common form of hair
In a study of medical records gathered on hundreds of thousands of African-American women, Johns Hopkins researchers say they have evidence that women with a common form of hair loss have an increased chance of developing uterine leiomyomas, or fibroids (2017-12-28)

Autoimmune disease discovery could spark new treatments
University of Colorado Boulder researchers have discovered a potent, drug-like compound that could someday revolutionize treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and other autoimmune diseases. (2017-11-20)

Molecular pathway offers treatment targets for pulmonary fibrosis, related conditions
A study led by investigators at Massachusetts General Hospital and University Health Network in Toronto has identified a molecular pathway that appears to be critical to the development of fibrosis -- scarring and excessive tissue deposition that result from abnormal healing responses and can compromise the function of vital organs. (2017-11-15)

Shock-wave therapy successfully treats finger ulcers in scleroderma patients
Extracorporeal shock-wave therapy at low energy levels showed promise as a new treatment for digital ulcers in patients with systemic sclerosis, or scleroderma, according to new research findings presented this week at the 2017 ACR/ARHP Annual Meeting in San Diego. (2017-11-04)

EULAR and ACR present SLE classification criteria at the 2017 ACR/ARHP Annual Meeting
The European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) and the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) will present the draft of new classification criteria for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) during a session at the 2017 ACR/ARHP Annual Meeting this week in San Diego, Calif., at the San Diego Convention Center. (2017-11-04)

Scientists discover novel treatment target for pulmonary fibrosis
Scientists have demonstrated that a unique population of immune cells plays a key role in the development of pulmonary fibrosis, and showed that targeting such cells could lead to new treatments for the disease. The findings have important implications for the development of future therapies, especially given that targeting such cells may lead to fewer adverse effects. (2017-07-12)

Research suggests link between imbalanced gut microbiome and systemic sclerosis
Americans and Norwegians with systemic sclerosis had higher levels of bacteria that can cause inflammation and lower levels of bacteria that are believed to protect against inflammation compared with healthy people. Study participants from United States, however, had a greater imbalance between the 'good' and 'bad' gut bacteria compared with the participants from Norway. The researchers suspect that the difference is because of a combination of genetics and diet. (2017-05-11)

Peptide reverses cardiac fibrosis in a preclinical model of congestive heart failure
Cardiac fibrosis, an abnormal thickening of the heart wall leading to congestive heart failure, was not only halted but also reversed by a caveolin-1 surrogate peptide (CSD) in a preclinical model, report researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina in an article published online on Jan. 23, 2017 by Laboratory Investigation. CSD was able to decrease the fibrotic ventricular wall thickness and improve heart function, all with apparently no toxicity and minimal off-target effects. (2017-02-21)

Promising new drug stops spread of melanoma by 90 percent
Michigan State University researchers have discovered that a chemical compound, and potential new drug, reduces the spread of melanoma cells by up to 90 percent. (2017-01-04)

Gene activity predicts progression of autoimmune disease, Stanford researchers find
Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine and six other institutions have designed a new diagnostic tool for a rare and deadly autoimmune disease that affects the skin and internal organs. (2016-12-22)

Samumed selected for 7 presentations in 5 therapeutic areas at ACR 2016
Samumed, a leader in tissue regeneration, has been selected to feature seven presentations in five different therapeutic areas at the 2016 American College of Rheumatology (ACR) Annual Meeting from Nov. 11-16. Samumed's presentations will focus on the application of the company's novel, small-molecule Wnt pathway inhibitor compounds to treat the underlying pathology leading to the symptoms rather than the symptoms alone of the following diseases: Chronic Tendinopathy, Degenerative Disc Disease, Scleroderma, Osteoarthritis and Psoriasis. (2016-11-01)

New study suggests way to slow skin fibrosis in scleroderma
New and ongoing research at Hospital for Special Surgery in New York City has identified a possible mechanism behind the fibrosis that occurs in scleroderma -- a mechanism that may one day lead to a treatment for the disease. (2016-10-31)

Protein target may block deadly arterial remodeling in pulmonary hypertension
Pulmonary hypertension is a highly lethal disease that transforms the thin, flexible vasculature of the lungs into thick, dysfunctional blood vessels that can kill. (2016-07-05)

Female sex hormone clue to fighting serious immune disease
Female sex hormone clue to fighting serious immune disease (2016-06-10)

Drug does not reduce digital ulcers in patients with systemic sclerosis
In an article appearing in the May 10, 2016 issue of JAMA, Dinesh Khanna, M.D., of the University of Michigan Scleroderma Program, Ann Arbor, and colleagues evaluated the efficacy of the drug macitentan in reducing the number of new digital ulcers in patients with systemic sclerosis. (2016-05-10)

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