Current Sea Ice News and Events | Page 25

Current Sea Ice News and Events, Sea Ice News Articles.
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Study finds 24 percent of West Antarctic ice is now unstable
In only 25 years, ocean melting has caused ice thinning to spread across West Antarctica so rapidly that a quarter of its glacier ice is now affected, according to a new study. (2019-05-16)

Ice-sheet variability during the last ice age from the perspective of marine sediment
By using marine sediment cores from Northwestern Australia, a Japanese team led by National Institute of Polar Research (NIPR) and the University of Tokyo revealed that the global ice sheet during the last ice age had changed in shorter time scale than previously thought. This study was published on May 10 in the journal Scientific Reports. (2019-05-15)

Century-scale deep-water circulation dynamics in the North Atlantic Ocean
Dr Moriaki Yasuhara, Dr Hisayo Okahashi, and Dr Huai-Hsuan May Huang from School of Biological Sciences and Swire Institute of Marine Science of the University of Hong Kong (HKU), in collaboration with scientists in Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University, Duke University, and US Geological Survey have recently reported their discovery on a key driver of past and perhaps future abrupt climate change that is deep-water dynamics in the North Atlantic Ocean in the journal Geology. (2019-05-15)

Warming climate threatens microbes in alpine streams, new research shows
Changes to alpine streams fed by glaciers and snowfields due to a warming climate threaten to dramatically alter the types of bacteria and other microbes in those streams, according to new research. But streams that are fed by underground ice insulated by rock -- called 'icy seeps' -- offer some hope that the impact of climate change will be less severe in some areas. (2019-05-15)

Impact of CO2 leakage through North Sea wells
Realistic estimates show that global warming can only be kept below 1.5 or 2 degrees Celsius if carbon dioxide is actively removed from the atmosphere. Storage beneath the seafloor is an option that has been investigated intensively by an international team of scientists led by the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel. An assessment of opportunities and risks has now been published in the journal International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control. (2019-05-14)

New study boosts understanding of how ocean melts Antarctic Ice Sheet
An innovative use of instruments that measure the ocean near Antarctica has helped Australian scientists to get a clearer picture of how the ocean is melting the Antarctic ice sheet. Until now, most measurements in Antarctica were made during summer, leaving winter conditions, when the sea freezes over with ice, largely unknown. (2019-05-14)

Understanding relationship break-ups to protect the reef
Unravelling the secrets of the relationship between coral and the algae living inside it will help prevent coral bleaching, University of Queensland researchers believe. By using genomic data to look for genes that enhance resilience in the algae, researchers hope to help coral adapt to the environmental shifts created by climate change. (2019-05-13)

Coastal organisms trapped in 99-million-year-old amber
Most amber inclusions are organisms that lived in the forest. It is very rare to find sea life trapped in amber. However, an international research group led by Professor WANG Bo from the Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (NIGPAS) reported the first known ammonite trapped in amber. (2019-05-13)

Traces of Roman-era pollution stored in the ice of Mont Blanc
The deepest layers of carbon-14 dated ice found in the French Alps provide a record of atmospheric conditions in the ancient Roman era. Published in Geophysical Research Letters, the study, led by an international team and coordinated by a CNRS scientist, reveals significant atmospheric pollution from heavy metals: the presence of lead and antimony is linked to mining activity and lead and silver production by the ancient Romans. (2019-05-09)

The bird that came back from the dead
New research has shown that the last surviving flightless species of bird, a type of rail, in the Indian Ocean had previously gone extinct but rose from the dead thanks to a rare process called 'iterative evolution'. (2019-05-09)

Dexterous herring gulls learn new tricks to adapt their feeding habits
Observations of Herring Gulls by scientists from the University of Southampton have shown how the coastal birds have developed complicated behaviour to 'skin' sea creatures to make them safe to eat. Researchers think this feeding habit may be a response to urbanisation and changes in food availability. (2019-05-09)

How sea level rise affects birds in coastal forests
Saltwater intrusion changes coastal vegetation that provides bird habitat. Researchers found that the transition from forests to marshes along the North Carolina coast due to climate change could benefit some bird species of concern for conservation. (2019-05-09)

Color vision found in fish that live in near darkness
An international team of researchers discovered a previously unknown visual system that may allow color vision in deep, dark waters where animals were presumed to be colorblind. According to study co-author, Karen Carleton, from the University of Maryland, this means the genes that determine the spectrum of light vertebrate eyes are sensitive to are much more variable and evolve much more quickly than previously thought. (2019-05-09)

Precise temperature measurements with invisible light
NIST researchers have invented a portable, remarkably stable thermometer capable of measuring temperatures to a precision of within a few thousandths of a degree Celsius. (2019-05-09)

Tsunami signals to measure glacier calving in Greenland
Scientists have employed a new method utilizing tsunami signals to calculate the calving magnitude of an ocean-terminating glacier in northwestern Greenland, uncovering correlations between calving flux and environmental factors such as air temperature, ice speed, and ocean tides. (2019-05-08)

Threatened sturgeon learns for the fitness
An international team led by IGB is providing one of the first proofs of the complex learning behavior of fish in a recent study. The Atlantic sturgeon is considered extinct in Germany. The IGB is coordinating their reintroduction and is investigating whether sturgeon training can increase their fitness for the wild. An important fitness factor is their feeding behavior. Already a two-week 'learning lead' made the search for food more efficient. (2019-05-07)

Eddy currents affect flux of salt more than heat
Modeling the 3D structure of Red Sea eddies shows how transport of energy and biochemical materials influences circulation patterns in the Red Sea. (2019-05-06)

OU study on explosive volcanism during ice age provides lessons for today's rising CO2
A University of Oklahoma-led study recently found that explosive volcanic eruptions were at least 3-8 times more frequent during the peak of the Late Paleozoic Ice Age (~360 to 260 million years ago). Aerosols produced by explosive volcanism helped keep large ice sheets stable, even when CO2 levels increased, by blocking sunlight. But the volcanic emissions also may have started a cascade of effects on the climate system that resulted in additional CO2 removal from the atmosphere. (2019-05-02)

'Exotic' genes may improve cotton yield and quality
Improving cotton quality can have ramifications for $12B US cotton trade industry. (2019-05-01)

New inspection process freezes parts in ice
The University of Cincinnati developed a novel approach that uses ultrasound to inspect additive-manufactured parts by freezing them in a cylinder of ice and exposing them to ultrasonic waves. (2019-05-01)

Almost half of World Heritage sites could lose their glaciers by 2100
Glaciers are set to disappear completely from almost half of World Heritage sites if business-as-usual emissions continue. (2019-04-30)

NASA's Aqua Satellite finds Tropical Cyclone Fani stronger, more organized
Visible imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite showed Tropical Cyclone Fani appeared more organized than the previous day. (2019-04-30)

Rapid melting of the world's largest ice shelf linked to solar heat in the ocean
An international team of scientists has found part of the world's largest ice shelf is melting 10 times faster than the overall ice shelf average, due to solar heating of the surrounding ocean surface. (2019-04-29)

Researchers find ice feature on Saturn's giant moon
Research team finds huge ice feature on Titan while trying to understand where Saturn's largest moon gets all of its methane. This research, which used Principal Components Analysis in an unconventional way, also validated results from previous Titan missions. (2019-04-29)

GRACE mission data contributes to our understanding of climate change
Intended to last just five years in orbit on an experimental mission to measure changes in the Earth's gravitational fields, GRACE lasted over 15 years, providing unique insight into our global water resources, more accurate measurements of polar ice loss, ocean currents and the rise in global sea levels. (2019-04-29)

Ocean's 'seasonal memory' affects Arctic climate change
Researchers found out that the Arctic does not lose ice uniformly. Different seasonal patterns are at play depending on region: From the early 2000s, the ice cover in the Eurasian Arctic has been shrinking even in the winter period, while the American region only lost ice in the summer. The team explains this in terms of seasonal memory: a response of the winter ice cover to the atmospheric conditions in the previous summer. (2019-04-29)

Clearing an icy windshield is about to get easier, says UBC engineer
Scraping an icy windshield can be a seasonal struggle for those that live in colder climates. But engineers from UBC's Okanagan campus are aiming to ease that winter frustration with a new surface coating that can shed ice from large areas using little effort. (2019-04-26)

US Southeast Atlantic coast facing high threat of sea-level rise in the next 10 years
New research shows 75% of the Atlantic coast from North Carolina to central Florida will be highly vulnerable to erosion and inundation from rising tides by 2030, negatively impacting many coastal species' nesting habitats. (2019-04-26)

Place-based management can protect coral reefs in a changing climate
Scientists from the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa apply new computer models to identify where cesspool conversion and marine conservation efforts will minimize human impacts on coral reefs. (2019-04-25)

New approach to easier ice removal
Reducing the toughness, rather than the strength, between ice and the surface it covers is key to developing highly icephobic materials, a new study reports. (2019-04-25)

Accounting for ice-earth feedbacks at finer scale suggests slower glacier retreat
Accounting for the way the Antarctic ice sheet interacts with the solid earth below -- an important but previously poorly captured phenomena -- reveals that ice sheet collapse events may be delayed for several decades, at this major ice structure. (2019-04-25)

33-year study shows increasing ocean winds and wave heights
Extreme ocean winds and wave heights are increasing around the globe, with the largest rise occurring in the Southern Ocean, University of Melbourne research shows. (2019-04-25)

Ice-proof coating for big structures relies on a 'beautiful demonstration of mechanics'
A new class of coatings that sheds ice effortlessly from even large surfaces has moved researchers closer to their decades-long goal of ice-proofing cargo ships, airplanes, power lines and other large structures. (2019-04-25)

Uncovering Polynya: Research by NYU Abu Dhabi unravels 43-year-old mystery in Antarctica
A study led by NYU Abu Dhabi (NYUAD) Research Scientist Diana Francis has unraveled the four decade long mystery surrounding the occurrence of a mid-sea Polynya -- a body of unfrozen ocean that appeared within a thick body of ice during Antarctica's winter almost two years ago. (2019-04-24)

Reindeer adapt to climate change by eating seaweed
The arctic archipelago of Svalbard is already experiencing dramatic effects from climate change. A new study shows how these changes can force wild reindeer to graze on seaweed, a strategy that increases their likelihood of survival -- and is recorded in their poop. (2019-04-24)

The mobile game that can detect Alzheimer's risk
A specially designed mobile phone game can detect people at risk of Alzheimer's -- according to new research from the University of East Anglia. Researchers studied gaming data from an app called Sea Hero Quest, which has been downloaded and played by more than 4.3 million people worldwide. (2019-04-24)

A video game aids in research on Alzheimer's disease
Sea Hero Quest is a spatial navigation video game that can be played on cell phones, tablets and virtual reality applications, developed by scientists at the CNRS, at University College London, and the University of East Anglia. A new study based on the data collected from the game has shown that poor spatial orientation as an indicator can help in early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease, even prior to the appearance of any clinical signs. (2019-04-24)

Global warming hits sea creatures hardest
Global warming has caused twice as many ocean-dwelling species as land-dwelling species to disappear from their habitats, a unique Rutgers-led study found. The greater vulnerability of sea creatures may significantly impact human communities that rely on fish and shellfish for food and economic activity, according to the study published in the journal Nature. (2019-04-24)

'Catastrophic' breeding failure at one of world's largest emperor penguin colonies
Researchers at British Antarctic Survey studying hi-res satellite imagery have discovered that emperor penguins at the Halley Bay colony in the Weddell Sea have failed to raise chicks for the last three years. (2019-04-24)

Early melting of winter snowfall advances the Arctic springtime
Early melting of winter snow is driving the early arrival of spring in parts of the Arctic. (2019-04-24)

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