Current Sea Level Rise News and Events | Page 25

Current Sea Level Rise News and Events, Sea Level Rise News Articles.
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Satellite finds Tropical Cyclone Joaninha slammed by wind shear
One day makes a big difference when you're a tropical cyclone. On March 28, Tropical Cyclone Joaninha still maintained an eye, and on March 29, once outside winds ramped up, the storm weakened quickly. NOAA's NOAA-20 satellite provided an image of the storm that showed a large area of thunderstorms were pushed away from the center. (2019-03-29)

Okinawan sea grapes reveal secrets of plant evolution
Scientists decoded the genome of the popular Okinawan seaweed 'umi-budo' or 'sea grapes,' which could help ease the crop's cultivation and address environmental issues caused by the invasive spread of related species. (2019-03-28)

In ancient oceans that resembled our own, oxygen loss triggered mass extinction
Researchers provide first conclusive evidence linking widespread ocean oxygen loss and rising sea levels to a 430-million-year-old mass extinction event. (2019-03-28)

Sea anemones are ingesting plastic microfibers
Tiny fragments of plastic in the ocean are consumed by sea anemones along with their food, and bleached anemones retain these microfibers longer than healthy ones, according to new research from Carnegie ecologists. Their work is the first-ever investigation of the interactions between plastic microfibers and sea anemones, which are closely related to corals. (2019-03-28)

NASA finds Tropical Cyclone Joaninha maintaining an eye
Tropical Cyclone Joaninha is not yet ready to close its eye and weaken. Visible imagery from NASA's Terra satellite showed Tropical Cyclone Joaninha maintaining an eye thanks to low wind shear and warm sea surface temperatures. (2019-03-28)

NASA's Aqua Satellite keeps an 'eye' on Tropical Cyclone Joaninha
Visible imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite showed a visible eye remained in Tropical Cyclone Joaninha is it continued moving through the central Southern Indian Ocean. (2019-03-27)

NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Joaninha affecting Mauritius
Visible imagery from NASA's Terra satellite showed Tropical Cyclone Joaninha as it moved through the Southern Indian Ocean triggering warnings in the island nation of Mauritius. (2019-03-26)

Overland migration of Arctic Terns revealed
Data from a landmark three year study of the world's longest migrating seabird reveals how overland migration is an integral part of their amazing journey. (2019-03-25)

The Forces behind South and Central China's Extremely Hot Summer
The effects of extreme warming have been felt across the globe in recent years. What caused the extremely hot summer for South and Central China? The researchers found the heat was directly caused by a high-pressure system in the atmosphere, which greatly impacted the surface temperature. In addition to the effects of the high-pressure system, the ocean has continued to warm over the last decade and is predicted to continue warming into the long-term future. (2019-03-25)

The struggle for life in the Dead Sea sediments: Necrophagy as a survival mechanism
The Dead Sea is not completely dead. The most saline lake on Earth (more than 10 times saltier than sea water) is a harsh environment where only salt-loving microbes from the Archaea domain, known as extreme halophiles, are able to survive. Geologists are interested in the evolution of this lake and have been investigating its subsurface to reconstruct its biological and geological history. (2019-03-25)

The largest delta plain in Earth's history
The largest delta plain in Earth's history formed along the northern coast of the supercontinent Pangea in the late Triassic. Its size out-scales modern counterparts by an order of magnitude, and approximates 1 percent of the total land area of the modern world. And although contenders are found in the rock record, no ancient counterpart exceeds the extent of the Triassic delta plain mapped in the subsurface Barents Sea either. (2019-03-25)

Colonization in slow motion
There is a wide variety of animals living on the Arctic seabed. Attached to rocks, they feed by removing nutrients from the water using filters or tentacles. But it can take decades for these colonies to become established, and they probably don't achieve their natural diversity until much later. (2019-03-22)

Tall ice-cliffs may trigger big calving events -- and fast sea-level rise
Glaciers that drain ice sheets such as Antarctica or Greenland often flow into the ocean, ending in near-vertical cliffs. As the glacier flows into the sea, chunks of the ice break off in calving events. Although much calving occurs when the ocean melts the front of the ice, and ice cliff above falls down, a new study presents another method of calving: slumping. And this process could break off much larger chunks of ice at a quicker rate. (2019-03-22)

Tropical Cyclone Trevor fills Australia's Gulf of Carpentaria in NASA image
Visible imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite showed Tropical Cyclone Trevor filling up Australia's Gulf of Carpentaria. (2019-03-22)

Half-a-billion-year-old fossil reveals the origins of comb jellies
One of the ocean's little known carnivores has been allocated a new place in the evolutionary tree of life after scientists discovered its unmistakable resemblance with other sea-floor dwelling creatures. (2019-03-21)

Study gives new perspective on production of blood cells and immune cells
A new study provides a thorough accounting of blood cell production from hematopoietic stem cells. The results are important for understanding disorders such as anemia, diseases of the immune system, and blood cancers such as leukemias and lymphomas. (2019-03-21)

Arctic sea ice 2019 wintertime extent is seventh lowest
Sea ice in the Arctic appears to have hit its annual maximum extent after growing through the fall and winter. The 2019 wintertime extent reached on March 13 ties with 2007's as the 7th smallest extent of winter sea ice in the satellite record, according to scientists at the NASA-supported National Snow and Ice Data Center and NASA. (2019-03-20)

Discovery of parasitic arsenic cycle may offer glimpse of life in future, warmer oceans
A newly discovered parasitic cycle, in which ocean bacteria keep phytoplankton on an energy-sapping treadmill of nutrient detoxification, may offer a preview of what further ocean warming will bring. (2019-03-19)

Mathematicians reveal secret to human sperm's swimming prowess
Researchers, from the universities of York and Oxford, have discovered that a reinforcing outer-layer which coats the tails of human sperm is what gives them the strength to make the powerful rhythmic strokes needed to break through the cervical mucus barrier. (2019-03-19)

Study shows IPCC is underselling climate change
A new study has revealed that the language used by the global climate change watchdog, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), is overly conservative - and therefore the threats are much greater than the Panel's reports suggest. (2019-03-19)

New SDSU study examines role of sea urchins on California kelp
California sheephead and spiny lobsters may be helping control sea urchin populations in Southern California kelp forests, where sea otters -- a top urchin predator -- have long been missing, according to a new San Diego State University (SDSU) study published in the journal Ecology. The research provides new insight into the complex predator-prey relationships in kelp forests that can be seen in the absence of sea otters. (2019-03-14)

Sea otters' tool use leaves behind distinctive archaeological evidence
An international team of researchers has analyzed the use by sea otters of large, shoreline rocks as 'anvils' to break open shells, as well as the resulting shell middens. The researchers used ecological and archaeological approaches to identify patterns that are characteristic of sea otter use of such locations. By looking at evidence of past anvil stone use, scientists could better understand sea otter habitat use. (2019-03-14)

Diet-related changes in human bite spread new speech sounds
Contradicting the theory that the range of human sounds has remained fixed throughout human history, a new study reports that sounds such as 'f' and 'v', both common in many modern languages, are a relatively recent development -- one brought about by diet-induced changes in the human bite. (2019-03-14)

Tracking turtles with telemetry
A new model has been created that can forecast the location of Eastern Pacific leatherback turtles along the coast of Central and South America in an effort to decrease bycatch mortality of this critically endangered and ecologically important species. (2019-03-14)

How marine snow cools the planet
Researchers at the University of Sydney have mapped out how carbonate formations formed from 'marine snow' have helped regulate Earth's temperature over 120 million years. Dr Andria Dutkiewicz warns that global warming could release some of that carbon into the atmosphere. (2019-03-13)

The fiddlers influencing mangrove ecosystems
The types of bacteria living in and around fiddler crab burrows vary widely between mangroves, but their functional activities are remarkably similar. (2019-03-11)

Ancient records prompt rethink of animal evolution timeline
Scientists are rethinking a major milestone in animal evolution, after gaining fresh insights into how life on Earth diversified millions of years ago. (2019-03-11)

Southern Ocean acidification puts marine organisms at risk
New research co-authored by University of Alaska indicates that acidification of the Southern Ocean will cause a layer of water to form below the surface that corrodes the shells of some sea snails. (2019-03-11)

Atmospheric scientists reveal the effect of sea-ice loss on Arctic warming
Analyses indicate that Arctic amplification would not slow down until the 22nd and 23rd centuries. The sea ice loss is causing the rapid warming in the Arctic. (2019-03-08)

It's raining on the Greenland ice -- in the winter
Rainy weather is becoming increasingly common over parts of the Greenland ice sheet, triggering sudden melting events that are eating at the ice and priming the surface for more widespread future melting, says a new study. Some parts of the ice sheet are even receiving rain in winter -- a phenomenon that will spread as climate continues to warm, say the researchers. (2019-03-07)

New satellite keeps close watch on Antarctic ice loss
A recently-launched satellite mission has captured precision data on the elevation of the Antarctic ice sheet proving a valuable addition to monitoring efforts in the region, according to work published this week in The Cryosphere. (2019-03-06)

As sea level rises, wetlands crank up their carbon storage
Some wetlands perform better under pressure. A new Nature study revealed that when faced with sea-level rise, coastal wetlands respond by burying even more carbon in their soils. (2019-03-06)

Migrating snowline plays outsized role in setting pace of Greenland ice melt
Meltwater from Greenland's ice sheet is a leading contributor to global sea level rise, and a Brown University study shows that an underappreciated factor -- the position of the snowline on the ice sheet -- plays a key role in setting the pace of melting. (2019-03-06)

Radiography of marine litter in Spanish waters
Marine litter is a growing problem in the Mediterranean Sea, but few studies have focused on its composition, spatial distribution and temporal evolution. Now, a new study reveals that, in Spanish waters, plastics are the main component and that density is higher in the Alboran Sea than in the Levantine region or Catalonia, where accumulation has remained stable. (2019-03-04)

500-million-year old worm 'superhighway' discovered in Canada
Prehistoric worms populated the sea bed 500 million years ago--evidence that life was active in an environment thought uninhabitable until now, research by the University of Saskatchewan (USask) shows. (2019-02-28)

Climate change shrinks many fisheries globally, Rutgers-led study finds
Climate change has taken a toll on many of the world's fisheries, and overfishing has magnified the problem, according to a Rutgers-led study in the journal Science today. (2019-02-28)

Warm seas scatter fish
Fish provide a vital source of protein for over half the world's population, with over 56 million people employed by or subsisting on fisheries. But climate change is beginning to disrupt the complex, interconnected systems that underpin this major source of food. (2019-02-28)

Ice-free Arctic summers could happen on earlier side of predictions
The Arctic Ocean could become ice-free in the summer in the next 20 years due to a natural, long-term warming phase in the tropical Pacific that adds to human-caused warming, according to a new study. (2019-02-27)

Montana State team discovers 'incredibly' diverse microbial community high in Yellowstone
Montana State University researchers Dan Colman and Eric Boyd published their findings from a Smoke Jumper Geyser Basin hot spring in the journal Nature Communications earlier this month. (2019-02-27)

Northwest Coast clam gardens nearly 2,000 years older than previously thought -- study
A study led by SFU archaeology professor Dana Lepofsky and Hakai Institute researcher Nicole Smith reveals that clam gardens, ancient Indigenous food security systems located along B.C.'s coast, date back at least 3,500 years -- almost 2,000 years older than previously thought. These human-built beach terraces continue to create habitat for clams and other sea creatures to flourish in the area. (2019-02-27)

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