Current Seafloor News and Events | Page 2

Current Seafloor News and Events, Seafloor News Articles.
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New study reveals cracks beneath giant, methane gushing craters
250-million-year-old cracks in the seafloor feed greenhouse gas methane into giant craters in the Barents Sea. More than 100 craters, presently expelling enormous amounts of the greenhouse gas into the ocean, are found in the area. (2020-06-04)

New laser system provides 3D reconstructions of living deep-sea animals and mucus filters
Living in an essentially zero-gravity environment, many deep-sea animals have evolved soft, gelatinous bodies and collect food using elaborate mucus filters. Until now, studying these delicate structures has been virtually impossible. A new study published in the journal Nature describes a unique laser-based system for constructing 3D models of diaphanous marine animals and the mucus structures they secrete. (2020-06-03)

Oil platforms' fishy future
Marine biologists forecast the effects of oil platform decommissioning on fish communities. (2020-06-02)

Antarctic ice sheets capable of retreating up to 50 meters per day
The ice shelves surrounding the Antarctic coastline retreated at speeds of up to 50 meters per day at the end of the last Ice Age, far more rapid than the satellite-derived retreat rates observed today, new research has found. (2020-05-28)

Delicate seafloor ridges reveal the rapid retreat of past Antarctic ice
Detailed seafloor mapping of submerged glacial landforms finds that Antarctic ice sheets in the past retreated far faster than the most rapid pace of retreat observed today, exceeding even the most extreme modern rates by at least an order of magnitude, according to a new study. (2020-05-28)

Benthos in the Antarctic Weddell Sea in decline
Over the past quarter-century, changes in Antarctic sea-ice cover have had profound impacts on life on the ocean floor. (2020-05-07)

Fossil reveals evidence of 200-million-year-old 'squid' attack
Researchers say a fossil found on the Jurassic coast of southern England in the 19th century demonstrates the world's oldest known example of a squid-like creature attacking its prey. (2020-05-06)

Window to another world: Life is bubbling up to seafloor with petroleum from deep below
Microbial life is bubbling up to the ocean floor along with fluids from deeply buried petroleum reservoirs, reports a team of scientists from the University of Calgary and the Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole. (2020-05-01)

Seafloor currents may direct microplastics to biodiversity hotspots of the deep
Microplastic particles entering the sea surface were thought to settle to the seafloor directly below them, but now, a new study reveals that slow-moving currents near the bottom of the ocean direct the flow of plastics, creating microplastic hotpots in sediments of the deep sea. (2020-04-30)

Scientists find highest ever level of microplastics on seafloor
An international research project has revealed the highest levels of microplastic ever recorded on the seafloor, with up to 1.9 million pieces in a thin layer covering just 1 square meter. (2020-04-30)

Simulated deep-sea mining affects ecosystem functions at the seafloor
The environmental impact of deep-sea mining is only partially known. Also, there is a lack of standards to regulate mining and set binding thresholds for the impact on the local organisms. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology with colleagues at the Alfred Wegener Institute, the GEOMAR and others describe that deep-sea mining-related disturbances have a long-term impact on the natural ecosystem functions and microbial communities at the seafloor. (2020-04-29)

Disappearing Alaskan sea ice is significant for Arctic marine ecosystem
A new study shows that plant materials originating in Arctic sea ice are significantly incorporated into marine food webs that are used for subsistence in local communities of the greater Bering Strait region. The research has the potential to demonstrate the importance of sea ice ecosystems as a source of food in Arctic waters in Alaska and beyond. (2020-04-22)

New ethane-munching microbes discovered at hot vents
Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology in Bremen have discovered a microbe that feeds on ethane at deep-sea hot vents. They also succeeded in cultivating this microbe in the laboratory. What is particularly remarkable is that the mechanism by which it breaks down ethane is reversible. In the future, this could allow to use these microbes to produce ethane as an energy source. The study has now been published in the journal mBio. (2020-04-21)

First Gulf-wide survey of oil pollution completed 10 years after Deepwater Horizon
Since the 2010 BP oil spill, marine scientists at the University of South Florida (USF) have sampled more than 2,500 individual fish representing 91 species from 359 locations across the Gulf of Mexico and found evidence of oil exposure in all of them, including some of the most popular types of seafood. The highest levels were detected in yellowfin tuna, golden tilefish and red drum. (2020-04-15)

Discovery of life in solid rock deep beneath sea may inspire new search for life on Mars
Newly discovered single-celled creatures living deep beneath the seafloor have provided clues about how to find life on Mars. These bacteria were discovered living in tiny cracks inside volcanic rocks after researchers perfected a new method cutting rocks into ultrathin slices to study under a microscope. Researchers estimate that the rock cracks are home to a community of bacteria as dense as that of the human gut, about 10 billion bacterial cells per cubic centimeter. (2020-04-02)

Seafloor of Fram Strait is a sink for microplastic from Arctic and North Atlantic Ocean
Working in the Arctic Fram Strait, scientists from the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research (AWI) have found microplastic throughout the water column with particularly high concentrations at the ocean floor. (2020-03-27)

Researchers document seasonal migration in deep-sea
For the first time, researchers have documented seasonal migrations of fishes across the deep seafloor, revealing an important insight that will further scientific understanding of the nature of our planet. (2020-03-26)

Shifts in deep geologic structure may have magnified great 2011 Japan tsunami
Researchers say they have identified the origins of an unusual fault that probably magnified the catastrophic 2011 Japan tsunami. (2020-03-16)

Microbes far beneath the seafloor rely on recycling to survive
Scientists from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution reveal how microorganisms could survive in rocks nestled thousands of feet beneath the ocean floor in the lower oceanic crust. (2020-03-11)

Deep-sea fish community structure strongly affected by oxygen and temperature
In a new study, researchers from Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego and the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) took advantage of the natural oceanographic gradient in the Gulf of California to study the effects of variable oxygen levels and temperatures on demersal fish communities. They determined that in regions containing very low levels of oxygen (7 ╬╝mol/kg of oxygen or less), fish diversity declined dramatically. (2020-03-05)

A real global player: Previously unrecognised bacteria as a key group in marine sediments
From the shoreline to the deep sea, one group of bacteria is particularly widespread in our planet's seabed: The so-called Woeseiales, which may be feeding on the protein remnants of dead cells. Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology in Bremen and the Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research NIOZ now describe the distribution, diversity and lifestyle of these bacteria in The ISME Journal. (2020-02-17)

mystery solved: Why ocean's carbon budget plummets beyond the twilight zone
Helping fill a gap in the understanding of the biological carbon pump -- a major climate regulator -- a new study shows that fragmentation of large organic particles into small ones accounts for roughly half of particle loss in the ocean, making it perhaps the most important process controlling the sequestration of sinking organic carbon in the oceans. (2020-02-13)

Study examines the impact of oil contaminated water on tubeworms and brittlestars
A new study published by Dauphin Island Sea Lab researchers adds a new layer to understanding how an oil spill could impact marine life. A diverse community of worms and other marine organisms on the seafloor plays a large role in nutrient cycling, organic matter burial, and remineralization. The burrowing and feeding activities of these organisms or bioturbation helps in the oxygenation of the sediment. (2020-02-10)

How the ocean is gnawing away at glaciers
The Greenland Ice Sheet is melting faster today than it did only a few years ago. The reason: it's not just melting on the surface -- but underwater, too. (2020-02-03)

Robotic submarine snaps first-ever images at foundation of notorious Antarctic glacier
These are the first-ever images taken at the foundations of the glacier that inspires more fear of sea-level rise than any other - Thwaites Glacier. The grounding line is integral to Thwaites' fate and that of the world's coastlines. (2020-01-30)

A strong foundation
Anyone who's read 'The Lorax' will recognize that certain species serve as the foundation of their ecosystems. When the truffula trees disappear, so to do the swomee-swans and bar-ba-loots. However, the same is not necessarily true the other way around. (2020-01-29)

Seismic biomarkers in Japan Trench fault zone reveal history of large earthquakes
Researchers used a novel technique to study the faults in the Japan Trench, the subduction zone where the magnitude 9.1 Tohoku-Oki earthquake struck in 2011. Their findings reveal a long history of large earthquakes in this fault zone, where they found multiple faults with evidence of more than 10 meters of slip during large earthquakes. (2020-01-27)

Bending with the wind, coral spawning linked to ocean environment
A research team from Tohoku University, Ochanomizu University, and the National Institute for Basic Biology have utilized modeling analysis to indicate that environmental factors act as a determinant in the timing of mass spawning. (2020-01-23)

New SwRI models reveal inner complexity of Saturn moon
A Southwest Research Institute team developed a new geochemical model that reveals that carbon dioxide (CO2) from within Enceladus, an ocean-harboring moon of Saturn, may be controlled by chemical reactions at its seafloor. Studying the plume of gases and frozen sea spray released through cracks in the moon's icy surface suggests an interior more complex than previously thought. (2020-01-22)

Warmer and acidified oceans can lead to 'hidden' changes in species behavior
Research by scientists at Ghent University (Belgium), University of Plymouth (UK) and University of South Carolina (USA) shows the peppery furrow shell (Scrobicularia plana) makes considerable changes to its feeding habits when faced with warmer and more acidified oceans. (2020-01-20)

Study weighs deep-sea mining's impact on microbes
The essential roles that microbes play in deep-sea ecosystems are at risk from the potential environmental impacts of mining, a new paper in Limnology and Oceanography reports. The study reviews what is known about microbes in these environments and assesses how mining could impact their important environmental roles. (2020-01-14)

How nodules stay on top at the bottom of the sea
Rare metallic elements found in clumps on the deep-ocean floor mysteriously remain uncovered despite the shifting sands and sediment many leagues under the sea. Scientists now think they know why, and it could have important implications for mining these metals while preserving the strange fauna at the bottom of the ocean. (2020-01-13)

Submarine cables: billions of potential seismic sensors!
Scientists have for the first time shown that it is possible to detect the propagation of seismic waves on the seafloor using submarine telecommunications cables. According to their observations, this existing infrastructure could be used to detect earthquakes, as well as swell and underwater noise. (2019-12-18)

NRL-camera aboard NASA spacecraft confirms asteroid phenomenon
A US Naval Research Laboratory-built camera mounted on the NASA Parker Solar Probe revealed an asteroid dust trail that has eluded astronomers for decades. (2019-12-11)

Could dark carbon be hiding the true scale of ocean 'dead zones'?
The impact of climate change on the world's oceans is becoming increasingly known but new research suggests current computer models could be omitting a crucial piece of evidence when it comes to assessing the scale of ocean dead zones. (2019-12-10)

Solving the mystery of carbon on ocean floor
Little bits of black carbon littering the ocean floor, separate and distinct from the organic carbon believed to come from the ocean's surface. The source of that strange, and older, carbon has now been identified by UD researchers. The discovery is an important step in understanding the marine carbon cycle. (2019-12-04)

Illuminating seafloor seismology with existing 'dark' fiber-optic cables
A new fault system on the seafloor was discovered off California's coast by temporarily transforming a pre-existing underwater fiber optic cable into an array of nearly 10,000 seismic sensors, according to a new study. (2019-11-28)

New technology developed to improve forecasting of Earthquakes, Tsunamis
Geoscientists have successfully developed and tested a new high-tech shallow water buoy that can detect the small movements and changes in the Earth's seafloor that are often a precursor to deadly natural hazards. (2019-11-22)

What vision do we have for the deep sea?
The ocean hosts an inconceivable wealth of marine life, most of which remains unknown. International plans to mine minerals from the deep seafloor threaten this biodiversity hotspot. States are currently seeking to develop a legal framework for deep seabed mining. An international team of researchers from the Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies has published a study warning against a rush to exploit deep seafloor resources and calling for coordinated efforts to develop alternative approaches. (2019-11-14)

UNH researchers find climate change and turf seaweed causing 'patchy' seascape
Researchers at the University of New Hampshire find environmental developments caused by climate change are contributing to the transformation of the seafloor to a lower, more patchy seascape dominated by shrub-like seaweed which could impact species habitats and the structure of the food web. (2019-11-14)

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