Current Seafloor News and Events | Page 3

Current Seafloor News and Events, Seafloor News Articles.
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Largest mapping of breathing ocean floor key to understanding global carbon cycle
The largest open-access database of the sediment community oxygen consumption and CO2 respiration is now available. (2019-10-29)

Global analysis of submarine canyons may shed light on Martian landscapes
On a map, submarine canyons seem identical to land canyons -- so much so that researchers surmised they are shaped by the same physical laws. New research reveals distinct differences for the first time. (2019-10-09)

Using machine learning to understand climate change
Methane is a potent greenhouse gas added to the atmosphere through both natural and human activities. To predict the impacts of human emissions, researchers need a complete picture of the methane cycle. University of Rochester researchers used data science to determine how much methane is emitted from the ocean into the atmosphere each year. Their results fill a longstanding gap in methane cycle research and will help climate scientists assess the extent of human perturbations. (2019-10-08)

Seagrass meadows harbor wildlife for centuries, highlighting need for conservation
Seagrass meadows put down deep roots, persisting in the same spot for hundreds and possibly thousands of years, a new study shows. University of Florida researchers used modern and fossil shells from seagrass-dwelling animals to estimate the age of these meadows, showing that, far from being transient patches of underwater weeds, they are remarkably stable over time. (2019-10-02)

Hurricane Nicole sheds light on how storms impact deep ocean
2016's Hurricane Nicole had a significant effect on the ocean's carbon cycle and deep sea ecosystems, reports a team from the Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, and the Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences. (2019-09-19)

Researchers uncover role of earthquake motions in triggering a 'surprise' tsunami
In newly published research, an international team of geologists, geophysicists, and mathematicians show how coupled computer models can accurately recreate the conditions leading to the world's deadliest natural disasters of 2018, the Palu earthquake and tsunami, which struck western Sulawesi, Indonesia in September last year. (2019-09-05)

Crack in Pacific seafloor caused volcanic chain to go dormant
University of Houston geologists have discovered that 50 million years ago a chain of volcanoes between Northeast Asia and Russia were forced into a period of dormancy that lasted for 10 million years. (2019-08-26)

Origin of massive methane reservoir identified
New research provides evidence of the formation and abundance of abiotic methane -- methane formed by chemical reactions that don't involve organic matter -- on Earth and shows how the gases could have a similar origin on other planets and moons, even those no longer home to liquid water. (2019-08-20)

Study reveals profound patterns in globally important algae
A globally important ocean algae is mysteriously scarce in one of the most productive regions of the Atlantic Ocean, according to a new paper. A massive dataset has revealed patterns in the regions where Atlantic coccolithophores live, illuminating the inner workings of the ocean carbon cycle and raising new questions. (2019-08-20)

UNH technology helps map the way to solve mystery of pilot Amelia Earhart
Researchers from the University of New Hampshire's Marine School are part of the crew, led by National Geographic Explorer-at-Large Robert Ballard, that is setting out to find answers to disappearance of famed pilot Amelia Earhart. UNH has developed an autonomous surface vehicle (ASV), or robot, that can explore the seafloor in waters that may be too deep for divers. (2019-08-14)

Ten years of icy data show the flow of heat from the Arctic seafloor
In addition to 10 years of data on the flow of heat in the Arctic ocean seafloor, the USGS and Geological Survey of Canada have published an analysis of that data using modern seismic data. (2019-08-08)

Depleted seamounts near Hawaii recovering after decades of federal protection
After years of federally mandated protection, scientists see signs that this once ecologically fertile area known as the Hawaiian-Emperor Seamount Chain is making a comeback. (2019-08-07)

Lobster organs and reflexes damaged by marine seismic surveys
A new study of the impact on marine life of seismic air guns, used in geological surveys of the seafloor, has found that the sensory organs and righting reflexes of rock lobster can be damaged by exposure to air gun signals. (2019-07-24)

Scientists develop new method for studying early life in ancient rocks
Scientists have developed a new method for detecting traces of primordial life in ancient rock formations using potassium. (2019-07-08)

New research shows how melting ice is affecting supplies of nutrients to the sea
The findings of a research expedition to coastal Greenland which examined, for the first time, how melting ice is affecting supplies of nutrients to the oceans has been published in the journal Progress in Oceanography. (2019-06-25)

Scientists map huge undersea fresh-water aquifer off US Northeast
In a new survey of the sub-seafloor off the US Northeast coast, scientists have made a surprising discovery: a gigantic aquifer of relatively fresh water trapped in porous sediments lying below the salty ocean. It appears to be the largest such formation yet found in the world. (2019-06-21)

Marine microbiology -- Successful extremists
In nutrient-poor deep-sea sediments, microbes belonging to the Archaea have outcompeted bacterial microorganisms for millions of years. Their ability to efficiently scavenge dead cells makes them the basal producers in the food chain. (2019-06-19)

Marine oil snow
Marine snow is the phenomena of flakes of falling organic material and biological debris cascading down a water column like snowflakes. But an oil spill like Deepwater Horizon will add oil and dispersants to the mix, making marine oil snow that is can be toxic to organisms in deep-sea ecosystems. (2019-06-11)

New study finds microplastic throughout Monterey Bay
A new study shows that microplastic particles are not only common from the surface to the seafloor, but they're also being eaten by animals and incorporated into marine food webs. The most abundant types of plastic found in the water samples match those commonly used in consumer products. Most plastic waste comes from land, although it may travel far on ocean currents. The microplastic found in Monterey Bay was heavily weathered, suggesting that it had been at sea for months or years. (2019-06-06)

Sediment from fishing choking out sea sponges, study shows
Sediment stirred up from fishing activity has a negative effect on reef-building sea sponges in northern British Columbia, according to a new study by University of Alberta biologists. (2019-06-06)

Researchers find seaweed helps trap carbon dioxide in sediment
Florida State University researchers working with colleagues in the United Kingdom have found that these slimy macroalgae play an important role in permanently removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. (2019-06-03)

Ocean and space exploration blend at URI's Graduate School of Oceanography
Scientists with a NASA-led expedition are operating from the Inner Space Center at the University of Rhode Island's Graduate School of Oceanography as colleagues explore the deep Pacific Ocean to prepare to search for life in deep space. (2019-05-29)

Scientists find telling early moment that indicates a coming megaquake
Scientists combing through databases of earthquakes since the early 1990s have discovered a possible defining moment 10-15 seconds into an event that could signal a magnitude 7 or larger megaquake. (2019-05-29)

Study: Deep-ocean creatures living a 'feast-or-famine' existence because of energy fluxes
Scientists for the first time have tracked how much energy from plants and animals at the surface of the open ocean survives as particles drop to the seafloor more than two miles below, where they say a surprisingly robust ecosystem eagerly awaits. (2019-04-26)

Salish seafloor mapping identifies earthquake and tsunami risks
The central Salish Sea of the Pacific Northwest is bounded by two active fault zones that could trigger rockfalls and slumps of sediment that might lead to tsunamis, according to a presentation at the 2019 SSA Annual Meeting. (2019-04-24)

Signs of 1906 earthquake revealed in mapping of offshore northern San Andreas Fault
A new high-resolution map of a poorly known section of the northern San Andreas Fault reveals signs of the 1906 San Francisco earthquake, and may hold some clues as to how the fault could rupture in the future, according to a new study published in the Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America. (2019-03-27)

ANU scientists solve mystery shrouding oldest animal fossils
Scientists from The Australian National University (ANU) have discovered that 558 million-year-old Dickinsonia fossils do not reveal all of the features of the earliest known animals, which potentially had mouths and guts. (2019-03-25)

A first glimpse deep beneath an ultraslow-spreading mid-ocean ridge
For the first time ever, researchers have been able to peek deep into the mantle of the Earth under an ultraslow mid-ocean ridge, where they have been able to observe mantle melting and growth of the Earth's crust. (2019-03-22)

Hundreds of bubble streams link biology, seismology off Washington's coast
The first survey of methane vent sites off Washington's coast finds 1,778 bubble columns, with most located along a north-south band that is in line with a geologic fault. (2019-03-21)

How marine snow cools the planet
Researchers at the University of Sydney have mapped out how carbonate formations formed from 'marine snow' have helped regulate Earth's temperature over 120 million years. Dr Andria Dutkiewicz warns that global warming could release some of that carbon into the atmosphere. (2019-03-13)

Drilling results reveal global climate influence on basin waters in young rifts
New results from the Gulf of Corinth, Greece, a continental rift zone where the first stage of ocean basin formation is taking place, show how the environmental conditions and sediment input into the rift basin changed as the Earth alternated between non-glaciated to glaciated conditions over the last 500 thousand years. (2019-02-28)

Researchers discover a flipping crab feeding on methane seeps
Researchers have documented a group of tanner crabs vigorously feeding at a methane seep on the seafloor off British Columbia -- one of the first times a commercially harvested species has been seen using this energy source. (2019-02-20)

Researchers help define Southern Ocean's geological features
The scientists present data from the region that show the Australian-Antarctic Ridge has isotopic compositions distinct from both the Pacific and Indian mantle domains. (2019-02-08)

Deep sea reveals linkage between earthquake and carbon cycle
In order to understand the global carbon cycle, deep-sea exploration is essential, an international team led by geologists from Innsbruck concludes. For the first time, they succeeded in quantifying the amount of organic carbon transported into the deep sea by a single tectonic event, the giant Tohoku-oki earthquake in 2011. The results have now been published in Scientific Reports. (2019-02-07)

Study shows unusual microbes hold clues to early life
A new study has revealed how a group of deep-sea microbes provides clues to the evolution of life on Earth, according to a recent paper in The ISME Journal. Researchers used cutting-edge molecular methods to study these microbes, which thrive in the hot, oxygen-free fluids that flow through Earth's crust. (2019-02-07)

Variations in seafloor create freak ocean waves
Florida State University researchers have found that abrupt variations in the seafloor can cause dangerous ocean waves known as rogue or freak waves -- waves so catastrophic that they were once thought to be the figments of seafarers' imaginations. (2019-02-01)

A 'pacemaker' for North African climate
Researchers at MIT have analyzed dust deposited off the coast of west Africa over the last 240,000 years, and found that the Sahara, and North Africa in general, has swung between wet and dry climates every 20,000 years. (2019-01-02)

Not all marine protected areas are created equal
Europe's impressive network of marine protected areas (MPAs), which now cover 29 percent of territorial waters, is not as effective as has been thought at preserving the marine biodiversity it was created to protect. (2018-12-20)

Deep biosphere beneath the seafloor explored at American Geophysical Union fall meeting
The scientists are working to understand the nature of subseafloor microbial communities and whether these communities are unique. They're also researching where microbes in ocean crust come from and whether these microbes can provide clues about where to look for life on other planets. (2018-12-12)

Biggest mass extinction caused by global warming leaving ocean animals gasping for breath
By combining ocean models, animal metabolism and fossil records, researchers show that the Permian mass extinction in the oceans was caused by global warming that left animals unable to breathe. As temperatures rose and the metabolism of marine animals sped up, the warmer waters could not hold enough oxygen for their survival. (2018-12-06)

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