Current Seals News and Events

Current Seals News and Events, Seals News Articles.
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New negative pressure ventilator requiring fewer staffing resources developed in fight against COVID-19
A new negative pressure ventilator which could provide additional treatment options for patients with respiratory failure, including those with COVID-19 - and whose design can be easily adapted to developing countries - has been created by a team that includes anaesthetists, nurses and engineers. (2021-01-19)

Researchers trace geologic origins of Gulf of Mexico 'super basin' success
The Gulf of Mexico holds huge untapped offshore oil deposits that could help power the U.S. for decades. According to researchers at The University of Texas at Austin, the basin's vast oil and gas reserves are the result of a remarkable geologic past. Only a fraction of the oil has been extracted and much remains buried beneath ancient salt layers, just recently illuminated by modern seismic imaging. (2021-01-15)

Under Antarctica's ice, Weddell seals produce ultrasonic vocalizations
Weddell seals are chirping, whistling and trilling under Antarctica's ice at sound frequencies that are inaudible to humans, according to a research team led by University of Oregon biologists. Two years of recordings have captured nine types of tonal ultrasonic seal vocalizations that reach to 50 kilohertz. (2020-12-21)

Mystery of Siberian freshwater seal food choice solved
Seals native to Siberia's Lake Baikal have been found to have a remarkable adaptation in their teeth that has allowed them to prosper even in the face of limited nutrient offerings. (2020-11-30)

Scientists propose to make a laser scalpel with a 'curved' blade
Scientists from Tomsk Polytechnic University and Saratov State University teamed up with colleagues from Taiwan and proposed to make a laser 'blade' for a medical scalpel with a specified curved shape using a photonic 'hook'. (2020-11-20)

Plant research seals importance of microbes for survival and growth
Scientists have revealed that plants have a 'sealing' mechanism supported by microbes in the root that are vital for the intake of nutrients for survival and growth. (2020-11-20)

New fossil seal species rewrites history
An international team of biologists, led by Monash University, has discovered a new species of extinct monk seal from the Southern Hemisphere -- describing it as the biggest breakthrough in seal evolution in 70 years. (2020-11-10)

Tel Aviv University says 'environmentally-friendly' tableware harms marine animals
A new Tel Aviv University study compares the effects of two types of disposable dishes on the marine environment -- regular plastic disposable dishes and more expensive bioplastic disposable dishes certified by various international organizations -- and determines that the bioplastic dishes had a similar effect on marine animals as regular plastic dishes. (2020-11-04)

Immune protein orchestrates daily rhythm of squid-bacteria symbiotic relationship
New research led by University of Hawai'i at Mānoa scientists revealed that, in the mutually beneficial relationship between with the Hawaiian bobtail squid and the luminescent bacterium, Vibrio fischeri, an immune protein called ''macrophage migration inhibitory factor'' is the maestro of daily rhythms. (2020-10-19)

The future of krill
Although the krill catch is regulated, caution is required to avoid endangering the population itself and the species that depend on it, warns a group of krill experts headed by Prof. Dr. Bettina Meyer from the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research (AWI) in the journal Communications Earth & Environment - Nature. (2020-10-16)

A 2014 seal flu illustrates how avian flu viruses can adapt to spread between mammals
In a study appearing October 7, 2020 in the journal Cell Host & Microbe, researchers pinpoint the mammalian adaptation mutations that appeared during a deadly 2014 avian influenza outbreak in seals. They show that these mutations also made the virus transmissible via the air in ferrets and that similar mutations play a recurring and consistent role in making avian influenza viruses more transmissible between other mammal species. (2020-10-07)

Researchers find consistent mercury levels in arctic seals
Ringed seals and other Arctic marine mammals are important in the diet of Arctic Indigenous peoples. A study spanning 45 years of testing indicates that mercury concentrations in ringed seals from the Canadian Arctic have remained stable, showing very limited declines over time. (2020-10-07)

Some polar bears in far north are getting short-term benefit from thinning ice
The small subpopulation of polar bears in Kane Basin were doing better, on average, in recent years than in the 1990s. The bears are experiencing short-term benefits from thinning and shrinking multiyear sea ice that allows more sunlight to reach the ocean surface, which makes the system more ecologically productive. (2020-09-23)

Plant protein discovery could reduce need for fertilizer
Researchers have discovered how a protein in plant roots controls the uptake of minerals and water, a finding which could improve the tolerance of agricultural crops to climate change and reduce the need for chemical fertilisers. (2020-09-04)

Ichthyosaur's last meal is evidence of triassic megapredation
Some 240 million years ago, a dolphin-like ichthyosaur ripped to pieces and swallowed another marine reptile only a little smaller than itself. Then it almost immediately died and was fossilized, preserving the first evidence of megapredation, or a large animal preying on another large animal. (2020-08-20)

People power and satellites help scientists study climate impacts on Antarctic seals
A New Zealand-led international study of the crabeater seal population in Antarctica aims to understand environmental impacts on one of the southern-most mammals in the world. (2020-08-13)

Wonders of animal migration: How sea turtles find small, isolated islands
One of Charles Darwin's long-standing questions on how turtles find their way to islands has been answered thanks to a pioneering study by scientists. (2020-07-16)

Animals who try to sound 'bigger' are good at learning sounds
Some animals fake their body size by sounding 'bigger' than they actually are. Maxime Garcia from the University of Zurich and Andrea Ravignani from the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics studied 164 different mammals and found that animals who lower their voice to sound bigger are often skilled vocalists. Both strategies--sounding bigger and learning sounds--are likely driven by sexual selection, and may play a role in explaining the origins of human speech evolution. (2020-07-08)

Why do arteries age? Study explores link to gut bacteria, diet
Eat a slab of steak and your resident gut bacteria get to work immediately to break it down. But new research shows that a metabolic byproduct, called TMAO, produced in the process can be harmful to the lining of arteries, making them age faster. (2020-07-01)

Unknown currents in Southern Ocean have been observed with help of seals
Using state-of-the-art ocean robots and scientific sensors attached to seals, researchers in Marine Sciences at the University of Gothenburg have for the first time observed small and energetic ocean currents in the Southern Ocean. The currents are critical at controlling the amount of heat and carbon moving between the ocean and the atmosphere -- information vital for understanding our global climate and how it may change in the future. (2020-06-26)

Researchers study catastrophic disease events in marine mammals
Viruses were responsible for 72 percent of these events and caused 20 times the number of deaths than bacterial outbreaks. (2020-06-18)

Antarctic sea ice loss explained in new study
Scientists have discovered that the summer sea ice in the Weddell Sea sector of Antarctica has decreased by one million square kilometres -- an area twice the size of Spain -- in the last five years, with implications for the marine ecosystem. The findings are published this month (June 2020) in the journal Geophysical Research Letters. (2020-06-17)

Population ecology: Origins of genetic variability in seals
A new study led by Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich researchers shows that fluctuations in population sizes in the past have had a significant effect on contemporary seal populations, and estimates the risk of genetic impoverishment in the species investigated. (2020-06-10)

Last supper: Fish use sharp barbs and spines to fight off hungry seals
Research by Australia's Monash University reveals the steep price some marine mammals are willing to pay for food, after a stranded fur seal was discovered with more than a dozen facial wounds inflicted by its seafood prey. (2020-05-04)

Crabeater seal data used to predict changes in Antarctic krill distribution
The western Antarctic Peninsula is experiencing rapid environmental change, with warming temperatures and decreasing sea ice. How these changes will affect Antarctic krill is a crucial question, because this abundant crustacean is an important food source for a wide range of animals, from penguins to whales. Researchers have now used data from tracking studies of crabeater seals to infer the distribution of krill and project how it is likely to change in the future. (2020-04-27)

Tooth be told: Earless seals existed in ancient Australia
A fossilised seal tooth, dating back approximately three million years, found on a Victorian beach proves earless seals existed in Australia in prehistoric times. Known as monachines, the seals became extinct due to rapid changes in sea level. (2020-04-03)

Neanderthals ate mussels, fish, and seals too
Over 80,000 years ago, Neanderthals fed themselves on mussels, fish and other marine life. The first evidence has been found by an international team including Göttingen University in the cave of Figueira Brava in Portugal. The excavated layers date from 86,000 to 106,000 years ago, the period when Neanderthals settled in Europe. Sourcing food from the sea at that time had only been attributed to anatomically modern humans in Africa. Results were published in Science. (2020-03-26)

'Sushi parasites' have increased 283-fold in past 40 years
A new study led by the University of Washington finds dramatic increases in the abundance of a worm that can be transmitted to humans who eat raw or undercooked seafood. Its 283-fold increase in abundance since the 1970s could have implications for the health of humans and marine mammals, which both can inadvertently eat the worm. (2020-03-19)

Polar bears in Baffin Bay skinnier, having fewer cubs due to less sea ice
Satellite tracking of adult females and visual monitoring of polar bears in Baffin Bay show changes from the 1990s to the period from 2009 to 2015. Bears in Baffin Bay are getting thinner and adult females are having fewer cubs than when sea ice was more available. (2020-02-12)

Scientists listen to whales, walruses, & seals in a changing arctic seascape
A year-round acoustic study of marine mammals in the northern Bering Sea is providing scientists with a valuable snapshot of an Arctic world already under drastic pressure from climate change, according to WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society), Columbia University, Southall Environmental Associates, and the University of Washington. (2020-02-03)

Grey seals discovered clapping underwater to communicate
An international study, led by Australia's Monash University, has discovered wild grey seals can clap their flippers underwater during breeding season. (2020-02-02)

Whaling and climate change led to 100 years of feast or famine for Antarctic penguins
New research reveals how penguins have dealt with more than a century of human impacts in Antarctica and why some species are winners or losers in this rapidly changing ecosystem. (2019-12-02)

Animals could help humans monitor oceans
Sharks, penguins, turtles and other seagoing species could help humans monitor the oceans by transmitting oceanographic information from electronic tags. (2019-11-27)

Biology: Artic sea ice loss may facilitate disease spread in marine mammals
Artic sea ice reduction due to climate change may allow pathogens infecting sea mammals to spread more regularly between the North Atlantic and North Pacific oceans, according to a study published in Scientific Reports. Shifts in the environment, such as loss of sea ice, may drive exposure to new pathogens by altering animal behavior and opening up water routes that allow for contact between previously distinct populations. (2019-11-07)

Melting arctic sea ice linked to emergence of deadly virus in marine mammals
Scientists have linked the decline in Arctic sea ice to the emergence of a deadly virus that could threaten marine mammals in the North Pacific, according to a study from the University of California, Davis. (2019-11-07)

Concrete with improved impact endurance for defense structures developed at FEFU
Engineers from the Military Studies Center at Far Eastern Federal University (MSC FEFU) developed a brand-new concrete with improved impact endurance and up to 40% made of waste: rice husk cinder, limestone crushing waste, and siliceous sand. The new concrete is 6-9 times more crackle resistant than the types produced under GOST standards. The related article was published in Inorganic Materials: Applied Research. (2019-10-30)

Lonesome no more: White sharks hang with buddies
White sharks form communities, researchers have revealed. Although normally solitary predators, white sharks (Carcharodon carcharias) gather in large numbers at certain times of year in order to feast on baby seals. (2019-10-21)

The private lives of sharks
White sharks are top predators in the marine environment, but unlike their terrestrial counterparts, very little is known about their predatory activity underwater, with current knowledge limited to surface predation events. Now, a team of international scientists has used video- and data-logging technology to shed new light on predator-prey interactions of these mighty sea creatures. Their findings were published on July 4, 2019 in Marine Ecology Progress Series. (2019-10-01)

Corrosion resistance of steel bars in concrete when mixed with aerobic microorganisms
Dissolved oxygen in pore solution is often a controlling factor determining the rate of the corrosion process of steel bars in concrete. This study reports on the corrosion resistance and polarization properties of steel bars in a mortar specimen mixed with aerobic microorganisms. The addition of the microorganisms in mortar mixtures led to higher corrosion resistance, which was confirmed by the reduced rate of oxygen permeability, based on cathodic polarization properties. (2019-09-20)

Elephant seal 'supermoms' produce most of the population, study finds
Most of the pups born in an elephant seal colony in California over a span of five decades were produced by a relatively small number of long-lived 'supermoms,' according to a new study by researchers at the University of California, Santa Cruz. (2019-09-17)

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