Current Seaweed News and Events

Current Seaweed News and Events, Seaweed News Articles.
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These shrimplike crustaceans are the fastest snappers in the sea
The snapping claws of male amphipods--tiny, shrimplike crustaceans--are among the fastest and most energetic of any life on Earth. Researchers reporting in the journal Current Biology on February 8 find that the crustaceans can repeatedly close their claws in less than 0.01% of a second, generating high-energy water jets and audible pops. The snapping claws are so fast, they almost defy the laws of physics. (2021-02-08)

How seaweed-munching crabs could help save coral reefs
Coral reefs are facing a steep decline today for many reasons, including climate change, overfishing, pollution, disease, and more. What's taking their place is lots and lots of seaweed. But researchers reporting in the journal Current Biology on December 10 now have some encouraging news: native crabs can help to combat the seaweed and restore the reef. (2020-12-10)

Ireland's only dinosaurs discovered in antrim
The only dinosaur bones ever found on the island of Ireland have been formally confirmed for the first time by a team of experts from the University of Portsmouth and Queen's University Belfast, led by Dr Mike Simms, a curator and palaeontologist at National Museums NI. (2020-11-24)

A filter for environmental remediation
Scientists at Osaka University discovered a new method for producing sodium titanate mats nanostructured in a seaweed-like morphology for filtering heavy metal ions and radioactive materials from water. This work may lead to advances in treating contaminated wastewater. (2020-11-19)

The future is now: long-term research shows ocean acidification ramping up on the Reef
A new study has shown ocean acidification is no longer a sombre forecast for the Great Barrier Reef but a present-day reality. The study shows seawater carbon dioxide on the Reef has risen 6 per cent in ten years, matching the rate of carbon dioxide increases in the atmosphere. (2020-10-28)

Sprat, mollusks and algae: What a diet of the future might look like
Rethinking what we eat is essential if we hope to nourish ourselves sustainably and mind the climate. One option is to seek out alternative food sources from the sea. All the way at the bottom, where algae, cephalopods and tiny fish thrive, according to a new study from UCPH researchers. (2020-10-06)

Fish, seaweed inspire slippery surfaces for ships
Fish and seaweed secrete a layer of mucus to create a slippery surface, reducing their friction as they travel through water. A potential way to mimic this is by creating lubricant-infused surfaces covered with cavities. As the cavities are continuously filled with the lubricant, a layer is formed over the surface. In the journal Physics of Fluids, researchers in South Korea conducted simulations of this process to help explain the effects. (2020-09-15)

Cashing in on marine byproducts
As exploitation of wild fisheries and marine environments threaten food supplies, Flinders University scientists are finding sustainable new ways to convert biowaste, algal biomass and even beached seaweed into valuable dietary proteins and other products. In one of several projects under way at the Flinders Centre for Marine Bioproducts Development, researchers are looking to extract value from crayfish shells and other marine waste via a 'green' fluidic processing machine developed at the University. (2020-09-08)

In cell studies, seaweed extract outperforms remdesivir in blocking COVID-19 virus
In a test of antiviral effectiveness against the virus that causes COVID-19, an extract from edible seaweeds substantially outperformed remdesivir, the current standard antiviral used to combat the disease. (2020-07-24)

Dehydration increases amphibian vulnerability to climate change
Amphibians have few options to avoid the underappreciated one-two punch of climate change, according to a new study from Simon Fraser University researchers and others. Rising summer temperatures are also resulting in higher rates of dehydration among wet-skinned amphibians as they attempt to keep themselves cool. (2020-07-15)

Technique fishes valuable nutrients out of shrimp processing water
The seafood industry requires large amounts of water for food processing. Before used water is discharged, some organic matter, including protein, is typically removed. This sludge is usually landfilled or converted into biogas, which results in the valuable nutrients it contains being lost from the food chain. Now researchers report in ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering a method to recover these nutrients from shrimp processing water so they can be incorporated in food or feed. (2020-07-08)

Algae species discovered infesting NW Hawaiian waters has been identified
A newly-identified, fast-growing species of algae poses a major threat to coral reefs and the ocean ecosystem in the northwestern Hawaiian Islands. (2020-07-07)

Marine alga from the Kiel Fjord discovered as a remedy against infections and skin cancer
Using state-of-the-art approaches coupled with bio- and cheminformatics and machine learning, researchers at the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel have succeeded in discovering new, bioactive components of the Baltic Sea Baltic Sea seaweed Fucus vesiculosus and its fungal symbiont against infectious bacteria or skin cancer. (2020-07-02)

Seaweed takes scientists on trip 'through time' in the waters of Monterey Bay
New research led by Monterey Bay Aquarium tapped into a collection of dried, pressed seaweed to understand what the bay was like before the impacts of modern human activity. Researchers used the older algae specimens to extend the Bakun upwelling index back to 1878, 70 years before it began being monitoring Monterey Bay. (2020-06-16)

Solve invasive seaweed problem by turning it into biofuels and fertilisers
UK researchers have developed a cheap and simple way of creating biofuel and fertiliser from seaweed, whilst removing plastic from the oceans and cleaning up tourist beaches in the Caribbean and Central America. (2020-05-11)

Surf and turf: Green new deal should be a 'teal new deal'
Incorporating the oceans into climate policy is essential, scientists say in a new paper. (2020-05-05)

Learn from past to protect oceans
History holds valuable lessons -- and stark warnings -- about how to manage fisheries and other ocean resources, a new study says. (2020-04-24)

Warming climate undoes decades of knowledge of marine protected areas
A new study highlights that tropical coral reef marine reserves can offer little defence in the face of climate change impacts. And the changes that are being observed will force scientists, conservationists and reserve managers to rethink the role these protected areas can bring. (2020-04-24)

Environment: Satellite data used to detect marine plastic
A new method of detecting patches of floating macroplastics -- larger than 5 millimeters -- in marine environments is presented in Scientific Reports this week. The approach, which uses data from the European Space Agency Sentinel-2 satellites, is able to distinguish plastics from other materials with 86% accuracy. (2020-04-23)

Study examines environmental footprint of california dairy cows over 50 years
Producing a liter of milk in California emits less greenhouse gas and uses less land and water than it did in 1964, according to a recent study from researchers at the University of California, Davis. (2020-03-12)

1 billion-year-old green seaweed fossils identified, relative of modern land plants
'This fossil is about twice as old as the oldest tree, or oldest land plants' -- Researcher Shuhai Xiao. (2020-02-24)

Invasive species that threaten biodiversity on the Antarctic Peninsula are identified
Mediterranean mussels, seaweed and some species of land plants and invertebrates are among the 13 species that are most likely to damage the ecosystems on the Antarctic Peninsula. (2020-02-12)

Food packaging that's good enough to eat
These days, many people are concerned about plastic waste; however, the convenience, mechanical properties and cost of plastic food packaging are hard to beat. But now, a growing number of innovators and entrepreneurs are trying to make edible packaging and tableware from foods like seaweed, milk proteins and potato starch, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, produced in collaboration with ACS Central Science.  (2020-01-29)

A strong foundation
Anyone who's read 'The Lorax' will recognize that certain species serve as the foundation of their ecosystems. When the truffula trees disappear, so to do the swomee-swans and bar-ba-loots. However, the same is not necessarily true the other way around. (2020-01-29)

Crab-shell and seaweed compounds spin into yarns for sustainable and functional materials
Biobased fibres are made from two renewable marine resources and with promise in advanced applications, in wovens and medical materials, among others. The threads draw strength from the crab chitin component and flexibility from seaweed alginate. (2020-01-28)

Structures in seaweed shed light on sustainability
By examining the enzymes that break down the alginate, the researchers from China and the United Kingdom may be able to harness the natural process to produce biofuel. During this process, they identified previously unknown enzymatic families that contribute to the bioconversion. (2019-12-19)

New species of seaweed uncovered by genetic analyses
Genetic analyses have revealed remarkably higher species diversity in common red seaweed than previously assumed. It was thought that there were only five related species of the Gloiopeltis genus worldwide. However, it has been revealed that there are over ten in Japan alone. The reinstatement of the species Gloiopeltis compressa (Ryukyu-funori) was proposed by this international research collaboration group consisting of members from Kobe University. (2019-11-19)

Bursting the bubble: Revealing tasty genetic secrets of gigantic single-celled creatures
Researchers at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) recently unveiled key information about gene expression in sea grapes, which could help shed light on the evolution of sea grape morphology and help Okinawan farmers improve cultivation of umi-budo. (2019-11-19)

UNH researchers find climate change and turf seaweed causing 'patchy' seascape
Researchers at the University of New Hampshire find environmental developments caused by climate change are contributing to the transformation of the seafloor to a lower, more patchy seascape dominated by shrub-like seaweed which could impact species habitats and the structure of the food web. (2019-11-14)

Red algae thrive despite ancestor's massive loss of genes
You'd think that losing 25 percent of your genes would be a big problem for survival. But not for red algae, including the seaweed used to wrap sushi. An ancestor of red algae lost about a quarter of its genes roughly one billion years ago, but the algae still became dominant in near-shore coastal areas around the world, according to Rutgers University-New Brunswick Professor Debashish Bhattacharya, who co-authored a study in the journal Nature Communications. (2019-10-29)

Food comas and long-term memories -- New research points to an appetizing connection
There may be a connection between food comas -- resting after eating -- and the formation of long-term memories, a team of neuroscientists concludes based on its study on brain activity in sea slugs. (2019-10-10)

Warming impedes a coral defense, but hungry fish enhance it
Corals exude chemical defenses against bacteria, but when heated in the lab, those defenses lost much potency against a pathogen common in coral bleaching. There's hope: A key coral's defense was heartier when that coral was taken from an area where fishing was banned and plenty of fish were left to eat away seaweed that was overgrowing corals elsewhere. (2019-10-02)

'Charismatic carbon'
According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), addressing carbon emissions from our food sector is absolutely essential to combatting climate change. While land and agriculture took center stage in the panel's most recent report, missing was how the oceans at large could help in that fight. (2019-08-29)

How coastal mud holds the key to climate cooling gas
Bacteria found in muddy marshes, estuaries and coastal sediment synthesise one of the Earth's most abundant climate cooling gases -- according to new research from the University of East Anglia (UEA). Dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) is an important nutrient in marine environments with billions of tonnes produced annually by marine phytoplankton (microscopic plant-like cells), seaweed, corals and bacteria. (2019-08-19)

Seaweed sinks deep, taking carbon with it
Macroalgae is shown to be a major global contributor to carbon sequestration. (2019-08-05)

Satellite data reveals largest-ever macroalgae bloom
Scientists have used satellite observations to identify the largest bloom of macroalgae in the world, the Great Atlantic Sargassum Belt -- a heavy mass of brown algae stretching from West Africa to the Gulf of Mexico. (2019-07-04)

Scientists discover the biggest seaweed bloom in the world
The record-breaking belt of brown algae stretches from West Africa to the Gulf of Mexico -- and it's likely here to stay, says a team led by the USF College of Marine Science (2019-07-04)

Color change and behavior enable multi-colored chameleon prawns to survive
Chameleon prawns change color to camouflage themselves as the seaweed around them changes seasonally, new research shows. (2019-06-21)

Coral bleaching causes a permanent change in fish life
Repeat coral bleaching caused by rising sea temperatures has resulted in lasting changes to fish communities, according to a new long-term study in the Seychelles. (2019-06-18)

Seaweed feed additive cuts livestock methane but poses questions
Supplementing cattle feed with seaweed could result in a significant reduction in methane belched by livestock, according to Penn State researchers, but they caution that the practice may not be a realistic strategy to battle climate change. (2019-06-17)

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