Current Segregation News and Events

Current Segregation News and Events, Segregation News Articles.
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US cities segregated not just by where people live, but where they travel daily
An analysis of 133 million tweets found that city-dwellers stay racially segregated as they eat, drink, shop, socialize and travel each day, demonstrating even deeper segregation than previously understood. (2021-02-11)

Black lung cancer patients die sooner than white counterparts
Structural racism thwarts a large proportion of black patients from receiving appropriate lung cancer care, resulting in worse outcomes and shorter lifespans than white patients with the disease. (2021-01-29)

Historically redlined neighborhoods are more likely to lack greenspace today
Historically redlined neighborhoods are more likely to have a paucity of greenspace today compared to other neighborhoods. The study by researchers at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health and the University of California, Berkeley and San Francisco, demonstrates the lasting effects of redlining, a racist mortgage appraisal practice of the 1930s that established and exacerbated racial residential segregation in the United States. (2021-01-27)

Addressing health disparities in diabetes requires a broader look at systemic racism
Poor social conditions caused by systemic racism contribute to health disparities in people with diabetes, according to a paper published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. (2021-01-26)

Commuting patterns could explain higher incidence of Covid-19 in Black Americans
The disproportionately high Covid-19 infection rates observed in Black Americans could be linked to their daily commuting patterns, according to a new study published today in the Journal of the Royal Society Interface. (2021-01-26)

New study measures neighborhood inequality and violence based on everyday mobility
A new study looking at the patterns of movement from 400,000 people offers fresh insights into how a neighborhood's economic conditions mixed with the mobility patterns of its residents and visitors relates to the well-being of the neighborhood and can serve as a predictor of violence. The theory argues that a neighborhood's well-being depends not only on its own socioeconomic conditions but on the conditions of the neighborhoods its residents visit and are visited by. (2020-12-17)

New theory of root competition reveals rules governing growth
In the presence of competitors, plants overproduce roots to snatch up nearby resources but avoid foraging for nutrients near their neighbors, according to a new study, which provides a new theoretical foundation for understanding the rules that govern competitive root behavior. (2020-12-03)

How plants compete for underground real estate affects climate change and food production
How do plant roots store carbon? Princeton researchers found that the energy a plant devotes to its roots depends on proximity to other plants: when close together, plants heavily invest in their root systems to compete for finite underground resources; if far apart, they invest less. As about a third of the world's vegetation biomass (and carbon) is belowground, this model provides a valuable tool to predict root proliferation in global earth-system models. (2020-12-03)

Teacher quality scores change depending on students, school, PSU study finds
School districts across the U.S. are increasingly using student test scores to rate the effectiveness of teachers, but a new Portland State University study found that the scores have less to do with individual teachers and more to do with their students and the schools. (2020-11-12)

Stem cells: new insights for future regenerative medicine approaches
The study published in Open Biology unravels important data for a better understanding of the process of division in stem cells and for the development of safer ways to use them in medicine. (2020-10-28)

Tough love: intense glare helps next-gen solar tech through awkward phase
Researchers have shown that high-intensity light will reverse light-induced phase segregation in mixed-halide perovskites, enabling bandgap control and maximising efficiency for potential photovoltaic applications. (2020-10-19)

Poor families must move often, but rarely escape concentrated poverty
Repeated unforeseen circumstances force low-income families to quickly move from one home to the next in a process that helps to perpetuate racial and economic segregation in the United States. Research offers possible policy fixes for helping families with housing vouchers move to high opportunity areas. (2020-10-08)

Chromosome defects seen from over-exchange of DNA in sperm and eggs
The exchange of DNA between chromosomes during the early formation of sperm and egg cells normally is limited to assure fertility. But when there are too many of these genetic exchanges, called crossover events, the segregation of chromosomes into eggs is flawed, say biologists who combined on a basic science project done across three labs at the University of Oregon and Northwestern University. (2020-10-07)

Defying a 150-year-old rule for phase behavior
Today, researchers from Eindhoven University of Technology and University Paris-Saclay are defying a classical theory from American physicist Josiah Willard Gibbs, with proof of a five-phase equilibrium, something that many scholars considered impossible. (2020-09-18)

Racial segregation drives disparities in COVID-19 and HIV diagnoses
Across the US, COVID-19 and HIV diagnoses are lowest in primarily white counties. They follow the same pattern, with diagnoses decreasing as the population of white residents in these counties increases. (2020-08-26)

Terms in Seattle-area rental ads reinforce neighborhood segregation
A new University of Washington study of Seattle-area rental ads shows how certain words and phrases are common to different neighborhoods, helping to reinforce residential segregation. (2020-08-26)

New deal housing programs dramatically increased segregation, new study finds
Housing programs adopted during the New Deal increased segregation in American cities and towns, creating racial disparities that continue to characterize life in the 21st century, finds a new study. (2020-08-24)

Survival of the fit-ish
It can be hard to dispute the common adage 'survival of the fittest'. After all, ''most of the genes in the genome are there because they're doing something good,'' says Sarah Zanders, PhD, assistant investigator at the Stowers Institute for Medical Research. But, she says, ''others are just there because they've figured out a way to be there.'' (2020-08-17)

Scientists discover new class of semiconducting entropy-stabilized materials
The design of novel materials with superior characteristics by entropy stabilization is a very dynamic emerging research area in materials science. However, despite recent advances in entropy-stabilized metals and insulating ceramics targeted for structural applications, there is still a dearth of high-entropy semiconductors, which poses a major obstacle for the adoption of high-entropy materials in semiconducting functional applications. Our study aims to realize a novel class of the semiconducting entropy-stabilized chalcogenide alloys. (2020-07-31)

Two distinct circuits drive inhibition in the sensory thalamus of the brain
The thalamus is a 'Grand Central Station' for sensory information coming to our brains. Almost every sight, sound, taste and touch travels to our brain's cortex via the thalamus. Researchers now report that the somatosensory part of the thalamic reticular nucleus is divided into two functionally distinct sub-circuits that have their own types of genetically defined neurons that are topographically segregated, physiologically distinct and connect reciprocally with independent thalamocortical nuclei via dynamically divergent synapses. (2020-07-23)

The study of lysosomal function during cell division and chromosomal instability
By studying the role of lysosomes in mitosis, an IDIBELL and UB group discovers that alterations in the separation of chromosomes cause a detectable nucleus morphology once mitosis has finished. This morphology would be useful to identify cells that have chromosomal instability inherent in cancer cells. (2020-07-07)

Cancer study shows how chemicals cause complex cell mutations
Fresh insights into why some harmful substances are so efficient at causing cancer could aid the quest for better treatments. New research reveals how chemicals can cause changes in cells to help them dodge the body's immune system and build resistance to cancer drugs. Scientists tracked the impact of a toxic substance - similar to compounds found in tobacco, exhaust and some plants - to better understand how chemicals cause mutations in our cells' DNA. (2020-06-24)

New explanation found for the extreme complexity of mutations in tumor genomes
Scientists from the German Cancer Research Center and the Universities of Cambridge and Edinburgh have been studying the evolution of tumors following chemical damage. They discovered that the DNA lesions caused by the chemical are not eliminated immediately, but are passed on unrepaired over several rounds of cell division. This ''lesion segregation'' can drive unexpectedly complex patterns of mutations in the tumor genome, as the scientists have now published in the journal Nature. (2020-06-24)

Economic and social consequences of human mobility restrictions under COVID-19
A paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences by the research group coordinated by professor Fabio Pammolli at Politecnico di Milano analyzes the steep fall on the Italian mobility network during the pandemic and reveals a counterintuitive and somehow paradoxical result, since the contraction of mobility, in relative terms, has been more intense in the Regions where the diffusion of the virus has been negligible. (2020-06-22)

Place doesn't trump race as predictor of incarceration
Steven Alvarado is the author of 'The Complexities of Race and Place: Childhood Neighborhood Disadvantage and Adult Incarceration for Whites, Blacks, and Latinos,' published June 1 in the journal Socius showing that for black Americans growing up in better neighborhoods doesn't diminish the likelihood of going to prison nearly as much as it does for whites or Latinos. (2020-06-11)

Public parks guaranteeing sustainable well-being
An international team led by the University of Geneva (UNIGE) has ascertained how green spaces contribute to the well-being of city-dwellers. The research shows that parks play an essential role in the well-being of individuals, regardless of their social class, and that they cannot be replaced by other venues where people meet, such as shopping centers. When these parks are closed - as during the COVID-19 pandemic - it intensifies inequalities in well-being. (2020-05-27)

Understanding ceramic materials' 'mortar' may reveal ways to improve them
New research shows that in the important ceramic material silicon carbide, carbon atoms collect at those grain boundaries when the material is exposed to radiation. The finding could help engineers better understand the properties of ceramics and could aid in fine-tuning a new generation of ceramic materials. (2020-05-25)

How interstitial ordering affects high-strength steels
The performance of materials is strongly influenced by their alloying elements: Adding elements beyond the basic composition of the alloy can strongly influence the properties and performance of it. In practice, it is not only important which elements are added, but also to which amounts and how they order in the host lattice. (2020-05-14)

Neighborhood and cognitive performance in middle-age: Does racial residential segregation matter?
A study at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health found that black subjects who were exposed to highly segregated neighborhoods in young adulthood exhibited worse performance in cognitive skills in mid-life. This outcome may explain black-white disparities in dementia risk at older age. (2020-05-08)

How small chromosomes compete with big ones for a cell's attention
Scientists at the Sloan Kettering Institute have solved the puzzle of how small chromosomes ensure that they aren't skipped over during meiosis, the process that makes sperm and egg. (2020-05-06)

Discovered the physiological mechanisms underlying the most common pediatric Leukemia
Researchers from the Josep Carreras Leukaemia Research Institute unveil the mechanisms that lead to hyperdiploid Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Hyper D-ALL, the most common pediatric B-cell Leukaemia. (2020-04-23)

Segregation and local funding gaps drive disparities in drinking water
The fragmentation of water service in the US among thousands of community systems, most of which are small and rely on local funding, leaves many households vulnerable to water contamination or loss of service as droughts become more frequent, a Duke University analysis finds. Households in low-income or predominantly minority neighborhoods face the highest risks. Making sure their taps don't run dry will require a fundamental re-evaluation of how water systems are managed and funded. (2020-04-20)

Movement toward gender equality has slowed in some areas, stalled in others
Women have made progress in earning college degrees as well as in pay and in occupations once largely dominated by men since 1970 -- but the pace of gains in many areas linked to professional advancement has slowed in recent decades and stalled in others, finds a new five-decade analysis. (2020-03-30)

If you're poor, poverty is an environmental issue
A survey from Cornell researchers -- conducted among more than 1,100 US residents -- found that there were, in fact, demographic differences in how people viewed environmental issues, with racial and ethnic minorities and lower-income people more likely to consider human factors such as racism and poverty as environmental, in addition to more ecological issues like toxic fumes from factories or car exhaust. (2020-03-16)

NREL research boosts stability of perovskites, helps silicon solar cells
A change in chemical composition enabled scientists to boost the longevity and efficiency of a perovskite solar cell developed at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). (2020-03-10)

GPS for chromosomes: Reorganization of the genome during development
The spatial arrangement of genetic material within the cell nucleus plays an important role in the development of an organism. A research team from the University of Basel, in collaboration with scientists from Harvard University, has developed a method to trace the chromosomes in individual cells. Using this method, they have now been able to demonstrate that chromosomes reorganize during embryonic development. The study has recently been published in ''Molecular Cell''. (2020-02-28)

New repair mechanism for DNA breaks
Researchers from the University of Seville and the Andalusian Centre of Molecular Biology and Regenerative Medicine (CABIMER) have identified new factors that are necessary for the repair of these breaks. These factors, in contrast with those already known, only affect the repair between sister chromatids of breaks that have arisen during chromosome duplication. (2020-02-10)

Solitary confinement significantly increases post-prison death risk
Even just a few days of solitary confinement may significantly increase inmates' risk of death after serving their sentences. (2020-02-05)

The Lancet Planetary Health: Discriminatory redlining practices in the 1930s associated with present-day rates of emergency department visits due to asthma
Current rates of emergency department visits due to asthma are around 2.4 times higher in areas that were redlined - deprioritised for mortgage investment- in the 1930s, than in areas rated as the least risky investments (63.5 versus 26.5 visits per 10,000 residents per year), according to an observational study from eight Californian cities, published in The Lancet Planetary Health journal. (2020-01-27)

Racial discrimination in mortgage market persistent over last four decades
A new Northwestern University analysis finds that racial disparities in the mortgage market suggest that discrimination in loan denial and cost has not declined much over the previous 30 to 40 years, yet discrimination in the housing market has decreased during the same time period. (2020-01-23)

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