Current Sensors News and Events

Current Sensors News and Events, Sensors News Articles.
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Going Organic: uOttawa team realizing the limitless possibilities of wearable electronics
uOttawa Professor Benoît Lessard and his team are developing carbon-based technologies which could lead to improved flexible phone displays, make robotic skin more sensitive and allow for wearable electronics that could monitor the physical health of athletes in real-time. (2021-01-27)

Continuous monitoring of proteins a game-changer for patients with deteriorating health
A world-first discovery by Australian researchers could become a game-changer for patients at risk of rapid health deterioration, such as heart complications, stroke, sepsis and cancer. Researchers developed an antibody as a biosensor, to continuously monitor rapid changes in the concentration of EGFR, a protein present on cancer cells and in body fluids. (2021-01-25)

With new design, stretchable electronics perform better under strain
Researchers have created stretchable electronics that are less compromised by deformation. They also created several circuit elements with the design, which could lead to even more types of stretchable electronics. (2021-01-25)

Innovations through hair-thin optical fibres
Scientists at the University of Bonn have built hair-thin optical fibre filters in a very simple way. They are not only extremely compact and stable, but also colour-tunable. This means they can be used in quantum technology and as sensors for temperature or for detecting atmospheric gases. The results have been published in the journal ''Optics Express''. (2021-01-20)

Semiconductor chip that detects exhaled gas with high sensitivity at room temperature
The research team at Toyohashi University of Technology developed a testing chip using semiconductor micro-machining that can detect volatile gasses in exhaled breath in ppm concentrations at room temperature. The testing chip, which is formed in the size of a few square millimeters with semiconductor micro-machining technology, is expected to contribute to telehealth as an IoT gas sensor that can easily be used in the home for breath tests. (2021-01-19)

High-sensitivity nanophotonic sensors with passive trapping of analyte molecules in hot-spots
Optical sensing which captures fingerprint information of chemical or biological substances with light, plays a crucial role in many areas including environmental sensing, medical diagnostics and homeland security. Scientists from University at Buffalo demonstrated an optical sensor design which utilizes nano-scale trenches to passively concentrate and trap trace analytes in a solution, leading to the capability of detecting picogram level biomolecules such as glucose and amino acids. The devices also achieved effective trapping of nano-particles. (2021-01-13)

How to keep drones flying when a motor fails
Robotics researchers at the University of Zurich show how onboard cameras can be used to keep damaged quadcopters in the air and flying stably -- even without GPS. (2021-01-13)

How does your computer smell?
A keen sense of smell is a powerful ability shared by many organisms. However, it has proven difficult to replicate by artificial means. Researchers combined biological and engineered elements to create what is known as a biohybrid component. Their volatile organic compound sensor can effectively detect odors in gaseous form. They hope to refine the concept for use in medical diagnosis and the detection of hazardous materials. (2021-01-13)

In new Skoltech research, 'e-nose' and computer vision help cook the perfect chicken
Skoltech researchers have found a way to use chemical sensors and computer vision to determine when grilled chicken is cooked just right. These tools can help restaurants monitor and automate cooking processes in their kitchens, and perhaps one day even end up in your 'smart' oven. (2021-01-13)

Perceiving prosthesis as lighter thanks to neurofeedback
Transmitting sensory signals from prostheses to the nervous system helps leg amputees to perceive prosthesis as part of their body. While amputees generally perceive their prostheses as heavy, this feedback helps them to perceive the prostheses as significantly lighter, ETH researchers have shown. (2021-01-08)

Researchers repurpose 'damaged' polymer optical fibers to precisely measure magnetic fields
Optical fiber sensors can measure strain, temperature, pressure, and many other physical parameters along the fibers, but they are currently immune to electromagnetic noise -- interference from other external electric or magnetic interactions. It is a desirable trait, until the effect of the electromagnetic field on the fibers needs to be measured. An international research team has used what was previously considered a 'damaged' part of an optical fiber to develop such a magnetic field sensor. (2021-01-07)

Surveys identify relationship between waves, coastal cliff erosion
Researchers have always known that waves were an important part of the cliff erosion process, but they haven't been able to separate the influence of waves and rain before. After decades of debate over the differing roles that both play, new findings provide an opportunity to improve forecasts. (2020-12-28)

Taking greenhouse gas analysis on the road, er, rails
Since 2014, the University of Utah has maintained research-grade suites of air quality instruments installed on light rail trains that move throughout the Salt Lake Valley every day. These mobile sensors, researchers estimate in a new study, cover the same area as 30 stationary sensors, providing the Salt Lake Valley with a highly cost-effective way to monitor its greenhouse emissions and fill in gaps in emissions estimates. (2020-12-17)

UBCO research takes the chill off icy build-up on planes and wind turbines
New UBC Okanagan research is changing the way aircraft and wind turbine operators are addressing the risks related to ice build-up. In a follow-up study from one released previously this year, Assistant Professor Mohammad Zarifi and his team at UBCO's Okanagan MicroElectronics and Gigahertz Applications (OMEGA) Lab, have broadened the scope and functionality of their ice sensors. (2020-12-17)

Wireless, ultra-thin and battery-free strain sensors that are 10 times more sensitive
A research team from NUS Engineering has developed a new range of strain sensors that are 10 times more sensitive when measuring minute movements. These sensors are ultra-thin, battery-free and can transmit data wirelessly, making them attractive for a wide range of applications. (2020-12-15)

Getting the right grip: Designing soft and sensitive robotic fingers
To develop a more human-like robotic gripper, it is necessary to provide sensing capabilities to the fingers. However, conventional sensors compromise the mechanical properties of soft robots. Now, scientists at Ritsumeikan University, Japan, design a 3D printable soft robotic finger containing a built-in sensor with adjustable stiffness. Their work represents a big step toward safer and more dexterous robotic handling, which will extend the applications of robots to fields such as health and elderly care. (2020-12-10)

How commercial vessels could become tsunami early-warning systems
If a tsunami formed along the Cascadia Subduction Zone off the coast of Oregon, residents might have just 20-30 minutes to get to safety. Scientists have proposed a new forecasting system that could provide seaside towns with critical early warnings. (2020-12-10)

Hunting out hidden hydrogen: novel holey nanosheets for detecting hydrogen gas leaks
Although touted as the best clean energy carrier, the explosive nature of hydrogen (H2) warrants highly sensitive gas sensors for detecting H2 leaks. Currently used gas sensors either require high operating temperatures or have low sensitivity. Now, scientists from Korea have designed a novel sensor using holey 2D zinc oxide nanosheets, which has high sensitivity and fast response time, and has the potential for application in high-quality H2 sensors in the future. (2020-12-08)

In new step toward quantum tech, scientists synthesize 'bright' quantum bits
Qubits (short for quantum bits) are often made of the same semiconducting materials as our everyday electronics. But now an interdisciplinary team of chemists and physicists at Northwestern University and the University of Chicago has developed a new method to create tailor-made qubits: by chemically synthesizing molecules that encode quantum information into their magnetic, or ''spin,'' states. This new bottom-up approach could ultimately lead to quantum systems that have extraordinary flexibility and control, helping pave the way for next-generation quantum technology. (2020-12-08)

Smellicopter: an obstacle-avoiding drone that uses a live moth antenna to seek out smells
A University of Washington-led team has developed Smellicopter: an autonomous drone that uses a live antenna from a moth to navigate toward smells. Smellicopter can also sense and avoid obstacles as it travels through the air. (2020-12-07)

Robot fleet dives for climate answers in 'marine snow'
Sailing from Hobart, twenty researchers aboard CSIRO's RV Investigator hope to capture the most detailed picture yet of how marine life in the Southern Ocean captures and stores carbon from the atmosphere. (2020-12-03)

Photonics meets surface science in a cheap and accurate sensor for biological liquids
A new, simple, and inexpensive method of testing liquid biological samples that can be further developed to work in clinical settings, including real-time testing during surgery. The team plans to continue their research in increasing specificity as well as the sensitivity of this approach. They are going to file a patent application and look for industrial partners and investors interested in developing clinical devices based on this type of sensors. (2020-12-03)

New butterfly-inspired hydrogen sensor is powered by light
A new bioinspired prototype offers a total package of features unmatched by any hydrogen sensor currently on the market. While commercial hydrogen sensors only work at 150C or higher, the new tech is powered by light instead of heat. And the sensor can detect hydrogen at concentrations from as little as 10 ppm (for medical diagnoses) to 40,000 ppm (the level where the gas becomes potentially explosive). (2020-12-02)

Sensors for a 'smart' wound bandage may track healing, immune response: Study
Researchers from Skoltech and the University of Texas at Austin have presented a proof-of-concept for a wearable sensor that can track healing in sores, ulcers, and other kinds of chronic skin wounds, even without the need to remove the bandages. ''The next step is to utilize this sensor technology for in vivo studies and real-time monitoring of wound treatment effectiveness on human subjects in clinical settings,'' Skotech provost, Professor Keith Stevenson notes. (2020-12-02)

Ultrasensitive transistor for herbicide detection in water
University of Tokyo researchers have fabricated a tiny electronic sensor that can detect very low levels of a commonly used weed killer in drinking water. (2020-12-01)

Detecting bacteria with fluorescent nanosensors
Researchers from Bochum, Göttingen, Duisburg and Cologne have developed a new method for detecting bacteria and infections. They use fluorescent nanosensors to track down pathogens faster and more easily than with established methods. A team headed by Professor Sebastian Kruß, formerly at Universität Göttingen, now at Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB), describes the results in the journal Nature Communications, published online on 25 November 2020. (2020-11-30)

Teaching computers the meaning of sensor names in smart home
The UPV/EHU's IXA group has use natural language processing techniques to overcome one of the major difficulties associated with smart homes, namely that the systems developed to infer activities in one environment do not work when they are applied to a different one, because both the sensors and the activities are different. The group has come up with the innovative idea of using words to represent the activation of both sensors and human activity. (2020-11-30)

Electronic skin has a strong future stretching ahead
Soft, stretchy, slimline and strong electronics could accelerate the arrival of artificial skin. (2020-11-27)

Grabbing viruses out of thin air
Materials that convert mechanical into electrical or magnetic energy could open the door to a future of wearable and structure-integrated virus sensors. (2020-11-25)

Magnetic brain waves to detect injury and disease
Researchers have designed a new Optically Pumped Magnetometer (OPM) sensor for magnetoencephalography (MEG). The sensor is smaller and more robust in detecting magnetic brain signals and distinguishing them from background noise than existing sensors. Benchmarking tests showed good performance in environmental conditions where other sensors do not work, and it is able to detect brain signals against background magnetic noise, raising the possibility of MEG testing outside a specialised unit. (2020-11-23)

Controlling fully integrated nanodiamonds
Physicists at Münster University have succeeded in fully integrating nanodiamonds into nanophotonic circuits and at the same time addressing several of these nanodiamonds optically. The study creates the basis for future applications in the field of quantum sensing schemes or quantum information processors. The results have been published in the journal Nano Letters. (2020-11-23)

Carbon nanocomposites are now one step closer to practical industrial
Multifunctional materials were designed to allow self-diagnostic monitoring through an inexpensive technique. These materials were created by adding the carbon nanoparticles to polymer matrices. Essentially, the use of such materials has the potential to replace sensors in weight critical systems such as aircraft structures, with the material itself being able to provide measurements. (2020-11-23)

Building a better electronic touch
Two new studies introduce materials that improve the capabilities of electronic 'touch,' boosting the multimodality of artificial skin so that it more resembles the capabilities of human skin. (2020-11-19)

Motorized sensors aim to improve and speed up early-stage disease diagnosis
Researchers in the Cockrell School of Engineering want to make it easier to catch diseases earlier in the process, improving patient outlooks and taking some of the load off the medical system. (2020-11-18)

NIST sensor experts invent supercool mini thermometer
Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have invented a miniature thermometer with big potential applications such as monitoring the temperature of processor chips in superconductor-based quantum computers, which must stay cold to work properly. (2020-11-17)

Upgraded radar can enable self-driving cars to see clearly no matter the weather
A new kind of radar could make it possible for self-driving cars to navigate safely in bad weather. Electrical engineers at the University of California San Diego developed a clever way to improve the imaging capability of existing radar sensors so that they accurately predict the shape and size of objects in the scene. The system worked well when tested at night and in foggy conditions. (2020-11-17)

Community helps scientists evaluate smoke forecasts
Across the Wasatch Front, both researchers and community members maintain enough air quality sensors to provide a high-resolution picture of how the smoke moved through the valley--perfect for testing and refining smoke forecast models. (2020-11-17)

New fiber optic sensors transmit data up to 100 times faster
Fiber optic sensors - used in critical applications like detecting fires in tunnels, pinpointing leaks in pipelines and predicting landslides - are about to get even faster and more accurate. (2020-11-16)

Analysis paves way for more sensitive quantum sensors
Theoretical researchers at Pritzker Molecular Engineering have found a way to make quantum sensors exponentially more sensitive by harnessing a unique physics phenomenon. (2020-11-16)

Quantum tunneling pushes the limits of self-powered sensors
Using quantum tunneling, the lab of Shantanu Chakrabarty, at the McKelvey School of Engineering at Washington University in St. Louis, has developed self-powered sensors that can run for more than a year. (2020-11-16)

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