Current Sepsis News and Events

Current Sepsis News and Events, Sepsis News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 21 | 839 Results
Two distinct pathways leading to the development of septic shock pave the way for personalized medicine in sepsis
Diagnostics company SphingoTec GmbH announced today that two distinct processes are involved in the development of septic shock and that SphingoTec's biomarkers for endothelial function (vascular integrity) and cardiovascular depression allow early identification of these underlying mechanisms requiring different interventions. (2021-02-18)

New tech aims to tackle 'disseminated intravascular coagulation' blood disorder
Researchers have developed a new tool for addressing disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) - a blood disorder that proves fatal in many patients. The technology has not yet entered clinical trials, but in vivo studies using rat models and in vitro models using blood from DIC patients highlight the tech's potential. (2021-02-17)

Detecting multiple sepsis biomarkers from whole blood - made fast, accurate, and cheap
A multi-disciplinary team at Harvard's Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering and the University of Bath, UK, has further developed the Institute's eRapid technology as an affinity-based, low-cost electrochemical diagnostic sensor platform for the multiplexed detection of clinically relevant biomarkers in whole blood. The device uses a novel graphene nanocomposite-based surface coating and was demonstrated to accurately detect three different sepsis biomarkers simultaneously. (2021-02-12)

Virtual post-sepsis recovery program may also help recovering COVID-19 patients
A new paper published online in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society describes a 'virtual' recovery program for sepsis patients that may also help post-COVID-19 patients and survivors of other serious illnesses. (2021-02-10)

Study finds recommended ICU sedatives equally safe, effective
A study published today in the New England Journal of Medicine provides the most definitive evidence to date that, of the two drugs recommended for light sedation of patients receiving mechanical ventilation in the ICU, one is as effective and safe as the other. (2021-02-02)

Study identifies noncoding RNA involved in immune response and sepsis
When the body's immune response to an infection gets out of control, the result can be sepsis, a life-threatening condition in which an overwhelming inflammatory response can lead rapidly to failure of multiple organs and death. In a new study, researchers at UC Santa Cruz have identified a long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) molecule that regulates the expression of pro-inflammatory genes in immune system cells called macrophages and affects the susceptibility of mice to septic shock. (2021-02-01)

Hope for a vaccination against Staphylococcus areus infections?
Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) ranks among the globally most important causes of infections in humans and is considered a dreaded hospital pathogen. Active and passive immunisation against multi-resistant strains is seen as a potentially valuable alternative to antibiotic therapy. However, all vaccine candidates so far have been clinically unsuccessful. With an epitope-based immunisation, scientists at Cologne University Hospital and the German Center for Infection Research (DZIF) have now described a new vaccination strategy against S. aureus in the Nature Partner Journal NPJ VACCINES. (2021-01-20)

COVID-19 deaths really are different. But best practices for ICU care should still apply
COVID-19 deaths are indeed different from other lung failure deaths, according to two recent studies, with 56% of COVID-19 patients dying primarily from the lung damage caused by the virus, compared with 22% of those whose lungs fail due to other causes. But, the researchers conclude, the kind of care needed to help sustain people through the worst cases of all forms of lung failure is highly similar, and just needs to be fine-tuned. (2021-01-15)

Severe sepsis predicted by common protein
A sugar-binding protein could fuel terrible inflammation and worsen sepsis, a disease that kills more than 270,000 people every year in the US alone, reports a team of researchers led by immunologists at UConn Health. (2021-01-04)

Improving hospital nurse staffing is associated with fewer deaths from sepsis
According to a new study published in American Journal of Infection Control, improving nurse staffing as proposed in pending legislation in New York state would likely save lives of sepsis patients and save money by reducing the length of hospital stays. (2020-12-17)

Proenkephalin (penKid®) included in the ADQI consensus statements publication as functional kidney biomarker for the management of AKI patients
The Acute Disease Quality Initiative (ADQI) recommends the use of novel biomarkers for AKI management, including functional biomarkers as penKid®. (2020-12-16)

New salmonella proteins discovered
Only one small protein needs to be missing and salmonellae are no longer infectious. This was discovered in a study in which the pathogens were re-analysed using bioinformatics. (2020-12-16)

How to stop infections caused by carbapenemase-producing bacteria
The authors aimed to evaluate in vivo the efficacy of imipenem plus meropenem in an experimental murine model of sepsis caused by clinical isolates of carbapenemase-producing A. baumannii. The results of this study show that the combination of imipenem plus meropenem could be effective in the treatment of infections caused by strains of carbapenemase-producing A. baumannii (OXA-23 and OXA-58). (2020-12-16)

The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health: Black children diagnosed with severe sepsis are more likely to die than White or Hispanic children, hospital data suggests
Black children hospitalized in the US due to severe sepsis have 20% greater odds of death than White or Hispanic children, according to research published in The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health journal. (2020-12-14)

Genes could be key to new COVID-19 treatments, study finds
Potential treatments for Covid-19 have been identified after the discovery of five genes associated with the most severe form of the disease. (2020-12-11)

Large US study confirms COVID-19 complications: lung, kidney and cardiovascular issues
A large study of patients in the United States who contracted coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) confirms many complications of the disease, according to new research in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2020-12-08)

Researchers discover new particle in the blood of septic patients
Researchers at La Jolla Institute for Immunology (LJI) have found that people with sepsis have never-before-seen particles in their blood. The scientists are the first to show that these particles, called elongated neutrophil-derived structures (ENDS), break off of immune cells and change their shape as they course through the body. (2020-12-04)

Compound for Alzheimer's combats bacterial resistance to last-resort antibiotics in mice
An experimental drug for neurodegenerative diseases can also reverse resistance to ''last-resort'' polymyxin antibiotics among bacteria that cause sepsis, a life-threatening complication from infections. (2020-11-18)

In the lab, St. Jude scientists identify possible COVID-19 treatment
Immunologists have determined the process driving life-threatening inflammation, lung damage and organ failure in patients with COVID-19, sepsis and other inflammatory disorders suggesting possible treatment using existing drugs. (2020-11-18)

Antidepressant may prevent severe COVID-19, trial suggests
The antidepressant fluvoxamine appears to prevent COVID-19 infections from worsening and may help keep patients out of the hospital, a trial based on research from the University of Virginia School of Medicine suggests. (2020-11-13)

Collecting sperm from Covid-19 patients
How does Covid-19 affect sperm and thus the next generation´s immune system? Norwegian researchers are collecting sperm to find the answer. (2020-10-30)

New tricks for old antibiotics
The study published in the journal Immunity reveals that tetracyclines (broad spectre antibiotics), by partially inhibiting cell mitochondria activity, induce a compensatory response on the organism that decreases tissue damage caused during infection. This finding opens new doors in the field of disease tolerance and positions this group of antibiotics as potential adjuvant treatment for sepsis, due to their effects that go beyond the control of bacterial burden. (2020-10-22)

Protein that keeps immune system from freaking out could form basis for new therapeutics
Treatment with a peptide that mimics the naturally occurring protein GIV prevents immune overreaction and supports a mechanism critical for survival in mouse models of sepsis and colitis, according to a UC San Diego study. (2020-10-14)

Penn Medicine scientists engineer bacteria-killing molecules from wasp venom
A team led by scientists in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania has engineered powerful new antimicrobial molecules from toxic proteins found in wasp venom. The team hopes to develop the molecules into new bacteria-killing drugs, an important advancement considering increasing numbers of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. (2020-10-12)

Study reveals element in blood is part of human--and hibernating squirrel--stress response
A new study published in the journal Critical Care Explorations shows for the first time that part of the stress response in people and animals involves increasing the levels of a naturally circulating element in blood. The discovery demonstrates a biological mechanism that rapidly responds to severe physiologic stress and potentially serves to protect us from further damage due to life-threatening conditions. (2020-10-01)

Negative pressure wound therapy does not cut infection risk in obese women after cesarean
Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) does not appear to lower the risk of infection for obese women after cesarean delivery, suggests a study funded by the National Institutes of Health. The treatment involves placing a low-pressure pump over a closed surgical wound to create negative air pressure. (2020-09-22)

4TEEN4's first-in-class therapeutic antibody Procizumab restores heart function in life-threatening cardiac depression induced by sepsis
4TEEN4 reports on the efficacy of Procizumab in a preclinical model of sepsis (2020-09-16)

Online tool informs recovery prospects for sepsis survivors
A doctor at Guy's and St Thomas', working with colleagues at the Intensive Care National Audit & Research Centre (ICNARC), has developed a tool to predict the risk of readmission to hospital or death in the first year after leaving hospital for adult survivors of sepsis. (2020-09-15)

Early steroids improve outcomes in patients with septic shock
Some critically ill patients with septic shock need medications called vasopressors to correct dangerously low blood pressure. When high doses of vasopressors are needed or blood pressure isn't responding well, the steroid hydrocortisone is often used. In this situation, earlier treatment with hydrocortisone reduces the risk of death and other adverse outcomes, reports a study in SHOCK®: Injury, Inflammation, and Sepsis: Laboratory and Clinical Approaches, Official Journal of the Shock Society. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer. (2020-09-14)

Cell-autonomous immunity shaped human evolution
Every human cell harbors its own defenses against microbial invaders, relying on strategies that date back to some of the earliest events in the history of life, researchers report. Because this ''cell-autonomous immunity'' is so ancient and persistent, understanding it is essential to understanding human evolution and human medicine, the researchers said. (2020-09-09)

SphingoTec's kidney function biomarker penKid® accurately detects acute kidney injury in infants
penKid® (Proenkephalin), a unique biomarker for the real-time assessment of kidney function. Novel data now demonstrate that penKid® also accurately predicts acute kidney injury in infants and provides substantial additional value on top of the diagnostic standard of care. (2020-08-27)

Patient monitoring systems for sepsis - mixed results on patient outcomes
Automated patient monitoring systems (PMSs) have been designed to reduce delays in diagnosis of sepsis in hospitalized patients. But so far, studies evaluating these systems have shown inconsistent effects on mortality rates and other patient outcomes, according to an evidence review in a special September supplement to the Journal of Patient Safety, which was funded by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer. (2020-08-24)

Quieting the storm
Experiments show acupuncture modulates inflammation in mice. Findings reveal site, intensity and timing of acupuncture affect disease course. Results can inform efforts to use acupuncture for treatment of human diseases marked by aberrant inflammation. (2020-08-12)

The yin and yang of inflammation controlled by a single molecule
Penn Study Reveals A Molecular Mechanism That Helps The Body Mount Perfectly Balanced Responses to Deadly Infections (2020-08-05)

Risk of sepsis greatest for patients with frailty, older age or urinary tract infections
Patients with frailty, older age and urinary tract infections (UTIs) are at greatest risk of developing sepsis following infection consultations in primary care, research has found. (2020-07-24)

Elevated levels of a specific protein found to correlate with inflammatory symptom severity in COVID
A new study found raised levels of transforming growth factor beta-induced protein (TGFBIp) in blood sampled from roughly 100 people hospitalized for COVID-19, and further found that elevated levels of (2020-07-24)

Increasing rates of preventable hospitalizations among adults with dementia
A team of investigators at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) has found that in recent years, increasing numbers of these hospitalizations were for conditions for which hospitalization can often be avoided with improvements in outpatient care. (2020-07-23)

Common childhood vaccine might prevent severe complications of COVID-19
A paper published by LSU Health New Orleans and Tulane University School of Medicine researchers suggests that live attenuated vaccines such as MMR (measles, mumps and rubella) may prevent the severe lung inflammation and sepsis associated with COVID-19 infection. (2020-06-26)

Race, rurality play prominently in Georgia areas hardest hit by COVID-19
While counties in populous metropolitan Atlanta had the highest number of COVID-19 cases in the initial weeks following Georgia's first reported case, it was rural Southwest Georgia counties, with a higher number of black residents and lower number of ICU beds, experiencing the highest rates of infection and death per capita, investigators report. (2020-06-25)

Hormone involved in obesity is a risk factor for sepsis
A group of scientists from Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência (IGC), led by Luís Moita, discovered that a hormone that has been pointed out as a treatment for obesity reduces the resistance to infection caused by bacteria and is a risk factor for sepsis. (2020-06-22)

Page 1 of 21 | 839 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.