Current Septic Shock News and Events

Current Septic Shock News and Events, Septic Shock News Articles.
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Sleep is vital to associating emotion with memory, according to U-M study
When you slip into sleep, it's easy to imagine that your brain shuts down, but University of Michigan research suggests that groups of neurons activated during prior learning keep humming, tattooing memories into your brain. (2021-02-22)

Two distinct pathways leading to the development of septic shock pave the way for personalized medicine in sepsis
Diagnostics company SphingoTec GmbH announced today that two distinct processes are involved in the development of septic shock and that SphingoTec's biomarkers for endothelial function (vascular integrity) and cardiovascular depression allow early identification of these underlying mechanisms requiring different interventions. (2021-02-18)

New insight into protein structures that could treat Huntington's disease
In Huntington's disease, a faulty protein aggregates in brain cells and eventually kills them. Such protein aggregates could, in principle, be prevented with a heat shock protein. However, it is not well known how these proteins interact with the Huntington's disease protein. New research by Patrick van der Wel (University of Groningen) and colleagues at the University of Texas has partially resolved the structure of heat shock proteins that bind to such aggregating proteins. (2021-02-12)

New insights put a freeze on the mechanisms for safely cryopreserving biological materials
The ability to freeze cells and even whole organs without damaging them, known as cryoprotection, is of considerable interest to medical practitioners, and scientists have experimented with chemicals called polyampholytes as cryoprotectants. In an article recently published in Communications Materials, a team of Japanese scientists now describes the mechanisms by which polyampholytes act to enable cryoprotection. Their insights may aid efforts to develop improved chemical cryoprotection technologies. (2021-02-09)

Researchers identify a new molecular mechanism related to severe anaphylaxis
In a study led by researchers of the University of Barcelona and IDIBAPS, researchers analyzed the mutation of a gen detected in a patient who suffered from recurrent anaphylactic shocks caused by the allergy to paper wasp venom (Polistes dominula). The results, published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, revealed a new molecular mechanism that can control the degree of severity in an anaphylactic reaction. (2021-02-09)

Cleaning Up the Mississippi River
Professor R. Eugene Turner reconstructed a 100-year record chronicling water quality trends in the lower Mississippi River by compiling water quality data collected from 1901 to 2019. The Mississippi River is the largest river in North America with about 30 million people living within its watershed. He tracked pH levels and concentrations of bacteria, oxygen, lead and sulphate in this new study. (2021-02-08)

Mast cells: Sentinels and high-speed messengers of the immune defense
A team of scientists at the Institute for Molecular and Clinical Immunology at the Otto-von-Guericke University Magdeburg unravels a crucial mechanism of cell-cell-communication during the defense against pathogens. (2021-02-04)

Load-reducing backpack powers electronics by harvesting energy from walking
Hikers, soldiers and school children all know the burden of a heavy backpack. But now, researchers have developed a prototype that not only makes loads feel about 20% lighter, but also harvests energy from human movements to power small electronics. The new backpack, reported in ACS Nano, could be especially useful for athletes, explorers and disaster rescuers who work in remote areas without electricity, the researchers say. (2021-02-03)

Study identifies noncoding RNA involved in immune response and sepsis
When the body's immune response to an infection gets out of control, the result can be sepsis, a life-threatening condition in which an overwhelming inflammatory response can lead rapidly to failure of multiple organs and death. In a new study, researchers at UC Santa Cruz have identified a long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) molecule that regulates the expression of pro-inflammatory genes in immune system cells called macrophages and affects the susceptibility of mice to septic shock. (2021-02-01)

Food export restrictions by a few countries could skyrocket global food crop prices
Recent events such as the Covid-19 pandemic, locust infestations, drought and labour shortages have disrupted food supply chains, endangering food security in the process. A recent study published in Nature Food shows that trade restrictions and stockpiling of supplies by a few key countries could create global food price spikes and severe local food shortages during times of threat. (2021-01-28)

Dungeness crab fishing industry response to climate shock
Fishermen contend with regulations, natural disasters, and the ups and downs of the stocks they fish, along with many other changes. As a result, fishing communities are quite resilient. That is, they can withstand, recover from, and adapt to change. (2021-01-05)

In shaky times, focus on past successes, if overly anxious, depressed
The more chaotic things get, the harder it is for people with clinical anxiety and/or depression to make sound decisions and to learn from their mistakes. On a positive note, overly anxious and depressed people's judgment can improve if they focus on what they get right, instead of what they get wrong, suggests a new University of California, Berkeley, study. (2020-12-22)

Secondary bloodstream infections associated with severe COVID-19
People with severe COVID-19 and a secondary blood infection were significantly sicker upon hospital admission, had longer hospital stays and poorer outcomes, according to a Rutgers study. (2020-12-22)

Proenkephalin (penKid®) included in the ADQI consensus statements publication as functional kidney biomarker for the management of AKI patients
The Acute Disease Quality Initiative (ADQI) recommends the use of novel biomarkers for AKI management, including functional biomarkers as penKid®. (2020-12-16)

COVID-19 patients at higher risk of death, health problems than those with flu
A deep dive into federal data by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis reveals a clearer distinction between COVID-19 and the flu: Among hospitalized patients, COVID-19 was associated with an increased need for ventilators, more admissions into intensive care units, longer hospital stays and nearly five times the risk of death than faced by those with the flu. (2020-12-15)

Researchers discover new particle in the blood of septic patients
Researchers at La Jolla Institute for Immunology (LJI) have found that people with sepsis have never-before-seen particles in their blood. The scientists are the first to show that these particles, called elongated neutrophil-derived structures (ENDS), break off of immune cells and change their shape as they course through the body. (2020-12-04)

Voyager spacecraft detect new type of solar electron burst
The Voyager spacecraft continue to make discoveries even as they travel through interstellar space. In a new study, University of Iowa physicists report on the Voyagers' detection of cosmic ray electrons associated with eruptions from the sun--more than 14 billion miles away. (2020-12-03)

Research leads to better modeling of hypersonic flow
Designing a thermal protection system to keep astronauts and cargo safe requires an understanding at the molecular level of the complicated physics going on in the gas that flows around the vehicle. Recent research at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign added new knowledge about the physical phenomena that occur as atoms vibrate, rotate, and collide in this extreme environment. (2020-12-03)

New medication to treat shock caused by blood or fluid loss found safe and effective
Hypovolemic shock, caused by severe loss of blood or body fluids, can be deadly if not treated promptly. Centhaquine is a new medication for the treatment of hypovolemic shock that increases blood flow to the heart and organs to prevent organ failure and death. It is still in clinical trials in the U.S. Results from a small, randomized, placebo-controlled trial in India found that centhaquine significantly improved blood pressure, blood lactate levels and reduced death rate when added to standard treatment. (2020-11-09)

HSS presents innovative research at 2020 ACR Annual Meeting
At this year's American College of Rheumatology virtual meeting, Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) presented exciting research related to rheumatology and orthopedic surgery. The research focuses on the diagnosis of renal disorders, the risk of venous thromboembolism after total knee replacement (TKR), and the care of pediatric and young adult patients with rheumatologic diseases. There are also studies related to the care of rheumatology patients during the COVID-19 pandemic. (2020-11-09)

RUDN University biologist found sex differences in inflammatory reactions in rat pups
A biologist from RUDN University studied the development of the immune response in prepubertal male and female animals. According to her, the severity and mortality of infectious and inflammatory diseases at this age depend not on the sex hormones, but mainly on the chromosome set or karyotype. (2020-11-09)

New mineral discovered in moon meteorite
The high-pressure mineral Donwilhelmsite, recently discovered in the lunar meteorite Oued Awlitis 001 from Apollo missions, is important for understanding the inner structure of the earth. (2020-11-03)

Increasing sleep time after trauma could ease ill effects, study says
Increasing the amount of time spent asleep immediately after a traumatic experience may ease any negative consequences, suggests a new study conducted by WSU researchers. Published today in Scientific Reports, the study helps build a case for use of sleep therapeutics following trauma exposure. The finding holds promise for populations that are routinely exposed to trauma, such as military personnel and first responders, and may also benefit victims of accidents, natural disaster, violence, and abuse. (2020-10-22)

SwRI researchers evaluate impact of wastewater systems on Edwards Aquifer
Southwest Research Institute developed an integrated hydrologic computer model to evaluate the impact of different types of wastewater disposal facilities on the Edwards Aquifer, the primary water source for San Antonio and its surrounding communities. The research results will guide authorities on what actions to take to protect the quality and quantity of water entering the aquifer. (2020-10-20)

Neuroscientists discover a molecular mechanism that allows memories to form
Encoding memories in engram cells is controlled by large-scale remodeling of the proteins and DNA that make up cells' chromatin, according to an MIT study. This chromatin remodeling, which allows specific genes involved in storing memories to become more active, takes place in multiple stages spread out over several days. (2020-10-05)

Senescent cells may be good when it comes to a bad injury
It's called senescence, when stressed cells can no longer divide to make new cells, and it's considered a factor in aging and in some diseases. Now scientists have some of the first evidence that at a younger age at least, senescent cells show up quickly after a major injury and are protective. (2020-09-29)

Computer model shows how COVID-19 could lead to runaway inflammation
New study addresses a mystery first raised in March: Why do some people with COVID-19 develop severe inflammation? The research shows how the molecular structure and sequence of the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein could be behind life-threatening inflammatory conditions MIS-C and cytokine storm. (2020-09-29)

Shorter time from symptom onset to hospitalization is associated with worse outcome in patients with COVID-19
New research presented at this week's ESCMID Conference on Coronavirus Disease (ECCVID, held online) shows that a shorter time from symptom onset to hospitalisation is associated with more serious disease and death in patients with COVID-19. The study is by Dr Annie Wong-Beringer and colleagues, University of Southern California (USC) School of Pharmacy, Los Angeles, CA, USA, and presented at ECCVID by co-author Amanda Chron. (2020-09-25)

Researchers demonstrate how deep learning can advance study of neural degeneration
Researchers have demonstrated the utility of artificial intelligence (AI) in identifying and categorizing neural degeneration in the model organism C. elegans. The tool uses deep learning, a form of AI, and should facilitate and expedite research into neural degeneration. (2020-09-24)

Grappling with questions about how COVID-19 can affect the heart
For an issue once expected to occur mostly in patients with severe COVID-19, heart conditions following SARS-CoV-2 infection are much more prevalent, writes Eric Topol in a Perspective. (2020-09-23)

4TEEN4's first-in-class therapeutic antibody Procizumab restores heart function in life-threatening cardiac depression induced by sepsis
4TEEN4 reports on the efficacy of Procizumab in a preclinical model of sepsis (2020-09-16)

Early steroids improve outcomes in patients with septic shock
Some critically ill patients with septic shock need medications called vasopressors to correct dangerously low blood pressure. When high doses of vasopressors are needed or blood pressure isn't responding well, the steroid hydrocortisone is often used. In this situation, earlier treatment with hydrocortisone reduces the risk of death and other adverse outcomes, reports a study in SHOCK®: Injury, Inflammation, and Sepsis: Laboratory and Clinical Approaches, Official Journal of the Shock Society. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer. (2020-09-14)

Antibiotic molecule enables immune system to kill HIV infected cells
A class of antibiotic molecules called pleicomacrolides inhibit the Nef protein, which HIV uses to evade the body's immune system. (2020-09-10)

UBC scientists find clues to queen bee failure
Scientists at UBC are unravelling the mysteries behind a persistent problem in commercial beekeeping that is one of the leading causes of colony mortality--queen bee failure. (2020-09-08)

Does the COVID-19 cytokine storm exist?
Cytokines play a crucial role in the immune response. If this immune response is too strong, also known as ''cytokine storm'', it can cause harm to the patient. Following the measurement of several important cytokines in patients with COVID-19 and various other severe diseases, researchers at Radboud university medical center show that COVID-19 is not characterized by a cytokine storm. This may have consequences for the treatment of these patients, the researchers write in JAMA. (2020-09-04)

Plant scientists study the interaction of heat stress responses in corn
A new study shows how two responses in separate locations inside plant cells work in concert to help corn plants respond to heat stress. The research was made possible by the Enviratron, an innovative plant sciences facility at Iowa State University that utilizes a robotic rover and highly controlled growth chambers. (2020-08-28)

SphingoTec's kidney function biomarker penKid® accurately detects acute kidney injury in infants
penKid® (Proenkephalin), a unique biomarker for the real-time assessment of kidney function. Novel data now demonstrate that penKid® also accurately predicts acute kidney injury in infants and provides substantial additional value on top of the diagnostic standard of care. (2020-08-27)

Meteorite strikes may create unexpected form of silica
When a meteorite hurtles through the atmosphere and crashes to Earth, how does its violent impact alter the minerals found at the landing site? What can the short-lived chemical phases created by these extreme impacts teach scientists about the minerals existing at the high-temperature and pressure conditions found deep inside the planet? New work examining the crystal structure of the silica mineral quartz under shock compression is challenging longstanding assumptions about this ubiquitous material. (2020-08-26)

Punitive sentencing led to higher incarceration rates throughout adulthood for certain birth cohorts in North Carolina
A new study using 45 years of incarceration data from North Carolina suggests an alternative explanation to the current rates of incarceration: this pattern is driven by the prolonged involvement in the criminal justice system by members of Generation X, who came of age during the 1980s and early 1990s. (2020-08-24)

People can make better choices when it benefits others
People are better at learning and decision-making when trying to avoid harm to others, according to new research published in JNeurosci. (2020-08-24)

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