Current Sequencing News and Events

Current Sequencing News and Events, Sequencing News Articles.
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Cre-controlled CRISPR: Conditional gene inactivation just got easier
The ability to turn a gene off only in a specific cell type is essential to modern life science. Thanks to the Cre-Controlled CRISPR it has just became simpler. The new method developed by researchers from the Center for Regenerative Therapies Dresden (CRTD) at TU Dresden with support from the DRESDEN-concept Genome Center (DCGC) offers a fast and easy approach for conditional gene inactivation. The findings were published in the journal ''Nature Communications.'' (2021-02-23)

Scientists identify potential contributor to hyper immune responses in patients with severe COVID-19
Researchers have pinpointed a helper T cell population in the lungs of patients with severe COVID-19 that may be central to the development of hyperinflammation, lung injury, and subsequent acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) during disease (2021-02-23)

CovMT: Tracking virus mutations across the world
An interactive platform helps users visualize where SARS-CoV-2 mutations start, how wide they spread and how infectious they are. (2021-02-21)

Advancing understanding of hop genome to aid brewers, medical researchers
Oregon State University and U.S. Department of Agriculture researchers have significantly expanded the understanding of the hop genome, a development with important implications for the brewing industry and scientists who study the potential medical benefits of hops. (2021-02-21)

An end to invasive biopsies?
Hebrew Unievrsity researchers have found a less invasive and more accurate options for diagnoses using a simple blood test that detects DNA fragments. (2021-02-08)

SSRgenotyper: A new tool to digitally genotype simple sequence repeats
Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are common components of genomic DNA that are widely used in genetic studies at the level of populations and individuals. However, the process of genotyping SSRs -- determining which individuals have which alleles -- still relies on time-consuming and potentially hazardous lab-based methods. SSRgenotyper is a new software tool that automates the process of genotyping entirely from sequenced reads and generates multiple file types for further downstream analysis. (2021-02-05)

Thoughts on plant genomes
The growing world population and the challenges posed by climate change make the control of these natural resources one of the most crucial issues for all humanity in the future. In this regard, genome sequence information is of fundamental importance for understanding natural diversity and evolution of living organisms as well as for the design of breeding strategies aimed to produce new varieties with suitable traits. (2021-02-03)

Geisinger-GeneDx research identifies frequent genetic causes of cerebral palsy
Researchers have discovered a strong link between genetic changes known to cause neurodevelopmental disabilities and cerebral palsy, further debunking birth asphyxia as its major cause. (2021-02-02)

Constructing the first version of the Japanese reference genome
The Japanese now have their own reference genome thanks to researchers at Tohoku University who completed and released the first Japanese reference genome (JG1). (2021-01-29)

Rare genetic syndrome identified, caused by mutations in gene SATB1
Variations in the gene SATB1 have been shown to cause a rare genetic syndrome. Different variations across the gene lead to varied effects on the cell, leading to a difference in the severity of neurodevelopmental disorders. Discovery of this genetic syndrome is hoped to provide information to families and individuals affected by SATB1-syndrome. (2021-01-28)

Viral sequencing can reveal how SARS-CoV-2 spreads and evolves
The article summarizes key insights about SARS-CoV-2 that have already been gained by sequencing of its genome from individual patient samples. It also cites challenges that remain, including the collection and integration of metadata into genetic analyses and the need for the development of more efficient and scalable computational methods to apply to hundreds of thousands of genomes. (2021-01-28)

'You say tomato, I say genomics': Genome sequences for two wild tomato ancestors
A research team led by University of Tsukuba has produced genome sequences for two wild species of tomato from South America, ancestors of the cultivated tomato. The ancestral species contain thousands of genes that are not present in modern types. The novel genes will help plant breeders produce new tomatoes with features like improved disease resistance, increased tolerance for the changing climate, and improved flavor and shelf-life. (2021-01-27)

Meta-Apo supports cheaper, quicker microbiome functional assessment
A new algorithm called Meta-Apo, developed by researchers led by JING Gongchao of the Qingdao Institute of BioEnergy and Bioprocess Technology (QIBEBT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) may reduce the need for expensive, time-consuming whole-genome sequencing computations to understand how a microbiome functions. (2021-01-22)

New, simplified genetic test effectively screens for hereditary cancers
Researchers have developed a new integrated genetic/epigenetic DNA-sequencing protocol known as MultiMMR that can identify the presence and cause of mismatch repair (MMR) deficiency in a single test from a small sample of DNA in colon, endometrial, and other cancers. This alternative to complex, multi-step testing workflows can also determine causes of MMR deficiency often missed by current clinical tests. Their results are presented in The Journal of Molecular Diagnostics, published by Elsevier. (2021-01-21)

Sequencing of wastewater useful for control of SARS-CoV-2
Viral genome sequencing of wastewater can detect new SARS-CoV-2 variants before they are detected by local clinical sequencing, according to a new study reported in mBio, an open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology. The ability to track SARS-CoV-2 mutations in wastewater could be particularly useful for tracking new variants, like the B.1.17 strain that is now widespread in the U.K. and has already been introduced in the US. (2021-01-19)

Scientists present novel approach for monitoring freshwater health
Researchers have used the world's smallest, smartphone-sized DNA sequencing device to monitor hundreds of different bacteria in a river ecosystem. (2021-01-19)

New computational tool reliably differentiates between cancer and normal cells from single-cell RNA-sequencing data
MD Anderson researchers have developed a new computational tool to accurately differentiate between cancer cells and normal cells when analyzing large single-cell RNA-sequencing data. (2021-01-18)

What the lungfishes' genome teaches us about the vertebrates' conquest of land
The genome of the Australian lungfish is the largest sequenced animal genome and helps us to better understand the conquest of land by vertebrates - study led by evolutionary biologists from the University of Konstanz (2021-01-18)

Comprehensive characterization of vascular structure in plants
With funding from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, two teams of plant researchers and bioinformatics researchers under the leadership of Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf (HHU) have succeeded for the first time in identifying the functions of the different cell types in the leaf vasculature of plants. They present their fundamental findings in the current edition of the journal ''The Plant Cell''. (2021-01-12)

New method helps pocket-sized DNA sequencer achieve near-perfect accuracy 
Researchers have found a simple way to eliminate almost all sequencing errors produced by a widely used portable DNA sequencer (Oxford Nanopore Technologies' MinION device). (2021-01-12)

Response to infection therapy better understood thanks to a new technique
A sequencing-based solution can be utilised to determine infection clearance and microbiota recovery. Next, the researchers will apply the technique to investigate the coronavirus disease. (2021-01-07)

Tracking the formation of the early heart, cell by cell
Richard Tyser and colleagues have mapped the origins of the embryonic mouse heart at single-cell resolution, helping to define the cell types that make up the heart in the earliest days of development. (2021-01-07)

New mammal reference genome helps ID genetic variants for human health
A new reference genome assembly identified more than 85 million genetic variants in the rhesus macaque, the largest database of genetic variation for any one nonhuman primate species to date. (2020-12-23)

Brain stem cells divide over months
For the first time, scientists at the University of Zurich have been able to observe the way stem cells in the adult brains of mice divide over the course of months to create new nerve cells. Their study shows that brain stem cells are active over a long period, and thus provides new insights that will feed into stem cell research. (2020-12-21)

Improved macaque genome enhances biomedical utility
Using advanced sequencing technology, researchers present a new, improved and far more complete reference genome for the rhesus macaque - one of the most important animal models in biomedical research. (2020-12-17)

Using CRISPR, new technique makes it easy to map genetic networks
UC Berkeley scientists has developed an easy way to genetically profile a cell, including human cells, and rapidly determine all DNA sequences in the genome that regulate expression of a specific gene. This can help track down upstream genes that regulate disease genes, and potentially find new drug targets. The technique involves CRISPRing the entire genome while giving each CRISPR guide RNA a unique barcode. Deep sequencing of pooled cells uniquely identifies control genes. (2020-12-10)

The world's first DNA 'tricorder' in your pocket
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory scientists have built the first mobile genome sequence analyzer, making DNA analysis portable and accessible anywhere in the world. (2020-12-07)

Gut research identifies key cellular changes associated with childhood-onset Crohn's Disease
Scientists have tracked the very early stages of human foetal gut development in incredible detail, and found specific cell functions that appear to be reactivated in the gut of children with Crohn's Disease. The results are an important step towards better management and treatment of this devastating condition. (2020-12-07)

Biologists from RUDN University discovered the secret of flaxseed oil with long shelf life
Biologists from RUDN University working together with their colleagues from the Institute of Molecular Biology of the Russian Academy of Sciences and the Institute of Flax studied the genes that determine the fatty acid composition in flaxseed oil and identified polymorphisms in six of them. The team also found out what gene variations could extend the shelf life of flaxseed oil. This data can be used to improve the genetic selection of new flax breeds. (2020-12-04)

Johns Hopkins team develops software that cuts time, cost from gene sequencing
A team of Johns Hopkins University researchers has developed a new software that could revolutionize how DNA is sequenced, making it far faster and less expensive to map anything from yeast genomes to cancer genes. (2020-12-03)

New DNA scanning method could lead to quicker diagnosis of cancer and rare disease
Scientists at the University of Nottingham have made a major breakthrough in genome sequencing, which will enable them to search for the underlying causes of diseases in human DNA quicker than ever before. (2020-11-30)

Global collaboration is unlocking wheat's genetic potential
In a paper published Wednesday, Nov. 25, 2020, in Nature, Kansas State University researchers, in collaboration with the international 10+ Genome Project led by the University of Saskatchewan, have announced the complete genome sequencing of 15 wheat varieties representing breeding programs around the world -- an invaluable resource to improve global wheat production. (2020-11-25)

COVID19 A research of Politecnico di Milano discovering the secrets of viral sequences
Use of an algorithm for computing viral mutations homogeneously across sources, using cloud computing. (2020-11-23)

The microbiome of Da Vinci's drawings
The microbiome study of seven drawings from Leonardo Da Vinci reveals that conservation work, geographical location, and past contaminations leave invisible traces on drawings despite their optimal storage conditions: a novel aspect of art objects that could be monitored to establish a bioarchive of our artistic heritage. (2020-11-20)

New tool to combat terrorism
Forensic science experts at Flinders University are refining an innovative counter-terrorism technique that checks for environmental DNA in the dust on clothing, baggage, shoes or even a passport. ''This microscopic environmental trace evidence, based on soil geochemical, bacterial and fungal analysis would complement and enhance current forensic intelligence tools,'' lead researcher Dr Jennifer Young says in new research in Forensic Science International: Genetics. (2020-11-19)

Coinfection: more than the sum of its parts
Infections with two pathogens pose a serious threat in the clinics. Researchers from Würzburg and Jena have developed a technique that provides new insights into this process and can be used as an early warning system. (2020-11-18)

The bull Y chromosome has evolved to bully its way into gametes
In a new study, published Nov. 18 in the journal Genome Research, scientists in the lab of Whitehead Institute Member David Page present the first ever full, high-resolution sequence of the Y chromosome of a Hereford bull. The research, more than a decade in the making, suggests that bulls' Y chromosomes have evolved dozens of copies of the same genes in a selfish attempt to make more males -- a move that is countered in the female-determining X chromosome. (2020-11-18)

Study identifies patients with lung cancer most likely to respond to immunotherapy
In a new study, researchers at UCLA found patients with a particular type of HLA, a protein scaffold involved in presenting pieces of proteins described as peptides to the immune system, were particularly likely to benefit from immunotherapy. (2020-11-16)

Diet affects skin gene expression in both healthy and atopic dogs
Differences in skin gene expression were observed between healthy and atopic Staffordshire Bull Terriers as well as between dogs that ate either dry food or raw food. Raw food appeared to activate the skin's immune system as well as the expression of genes that increase antioxidant production or have anti-inflammatory effects. (2020-11-13)

Scientists can now scoop contents of individual cells from their local environment
The new tool combines cell microscopy with the single-cell DNA and protein sequencing technology to enable connecting important information about the cell's physical features and its local environment to its molecular makeup. (2020-11-11)

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