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Current Sharks News and Events, Sharks News Articles.
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Little skates could hold the key to cartilage therapy in humans
Unlike humans and other mammals, the skeletons of sharks, skates, and rays are made entirely of cartilage and they continue to grow that cartilage throughout adulthood. New research published this week in eLife finds that adult skates go one step further than cartilage growth: They can also spontaneously repair injured cartilage. This is the first known example of adult cartilage repair in a research organism. The team also found that newly healed skate cartilage did not form scar tissue. (2020-05-12)

Ecotourism transforms attitudes to marine conservation
A study has shown how ecotourism in the Philippines has transformed people's attitudes towards marine conservation. (2020-05-04)

Giant teenage shark from the Dinosaur-era
Scientists of the University of Vienna examined parts of a vertebral column, which was found in northern Spain in 1996, and assigned it to the extinct shark group Ptychodontidae. In contrast to teeth, shark vertebrae bear biological information, like body size, growth, and age and allowed the team surrounding Patrick L. Jambura to gain new insights into the biology of this mysterious shark group. (2020-04-23)

Extinction of threatened marine megafauna would lead to huge loss in functional diversity
The extinction of threatened marine megafauna species could result in larger than expected losses in functional diversity, according to research led by Swansea University. (2020-04-17)

Cold War nuclear bomb tests reveal true age of whale sharks
Atomic bomb tests conducted during the Cold War have helped scientists for the first time correctly determine the age of whale sharks. (2020-04-06)

How old are whale sharks? Nuclear bomb legacy reveals their age
Nuclear bomb tests during the Cold War in the 1950s and 1960s have helped scientists accurately estimate the age of whale sharks, the biggest fish in the seas, according to a Rutgers-led study. It's the first time the age of this majestic species has been verified. One whale shark was an estimated 50 years old when it died, making it the oldest known of its kind. Another shark was an estimated 35 years old. (2020-04-06)

About the distribution of biodiversity on our planet
Large open-water fish predators such as tunas or sharks hunt for prey more intensively in the temperate zone than near the equator. With this result, a study headed by Marius Roesti of the University of Bern is challenging a long-standing explanation for the distribution of biodiversity on our planet. (2020-04-01)

Brand new shark(s), doo doo, doo doo doo doo
Two new species of sawsharks discovered in the West Indian Ocean reinforces how much we still don't know about life in the ocean and the impact climate change is having on it. (2020-03-18)

Vertical fibers in the suckerfish's suction cup-like fin help it hitchhike
As the hitchhikers of the marine world, the remora fish is well known for getting free rides by gripping onto hosts with its suction disc, a highly modified dorsal fin on its head. Now, work investigating the suction disc -- appearing Feb. 26 in the journal Matter -- reveals that one of the secrets to the fish's strong grip lies within the unique architecture of the lip of the disc. (2020-02-26)

Boom and bust for ancient sea dragons
A new study by scientists from the University of Bristol's School of Earth Sciences, shows a well-known group of extinct marine reptiles had an early burst in their diversity and evolution - but that a failure to adapt in the long-run may have led to their extinction. (2020-02-13)

Caribbean sharks in need of large marine protected areas
Governments must provide larger spatial protections in the Greater Caribbean for threatened, highly migratory species such as sharks, is the call from a diverse group of marine scientists including Stony Brook University School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences (SoMAS) PhD Candidate, Oliver Shipley. (2020-02-13)

Updated shark tagging atlas provides more than 50 years of tagging and recapture data
A citizen science program more than 50 years old has shed new light on the movements and distribution patterns of 35 species of Atlantic sharks. The updated database revealed new information on some of the least known species, and uncovered a few surprises about where sharks go and how long they live. (2020-01-31)

Recreational fishers catching more sharks and rays
Recreational fishers are increasingly targeting sharks and rays, a situation that is causing concern among researchers. (2020-01-27)

Large marine parks can save sharks from overfishing threat
'No-take' marine reserves -- where fishing is banned -- can reverse the decline in the world's coral reef shark populations caused by overfishing, according to an Australian study. But University of Queensland, James Cook University (JCU) and University of Tasmania researchers found that existing marine reserves need to be much larger to be effective against overfishing. (2020-01-23)

Sharp increase in Ningaloo whale shark injuries might be due to boat encounters
Almost one-fifth of the whale sharks (Rhincodon typus) in Western Australia's Ningaloo Reef Marine Park show major scarring or fin amputations, with the number of injured animals increasing in recent years, new research reveals. (2020-01-23)

Deep-sea osmolyte makes biomolecular machines heat-tolerant
Researchers have discovered a method to control biomolecular machines over a wide temperature range using deep-sea osmolyte trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO). This finding could open a new dimension in the application of artificial machines fabricated from biomolecular motors and other proteins. (2020-01-22)

Walking sharks discovered in the tropics
Four new species of tropical sharks that use their fins to walk are causing a stir in waters off northern Australia and New Guinea. (2020-01-20)

Shark and ray vision comes into focus
Until now, little has been known about the evolution of vision in cartilaginous fishes, particularly sharks and their genetic cousins, the rays. In a new study, it has been shown that all cartilaginous fishes, similar to the marine mammals, have lost the SWS1 and SWS2 opsin genes. Sharks and rays do contain both rod and cone photoreceptors; however rays possess two cone opsin genes whereas sharks have only one cone. Sharks therefore were found to have lost the ability to see colors. (2020-01-09)

Ocean acidification is damaging shark scales
Sharks have unusual type of scales referred to as 'denticles.' A research group from South Africa and Germany that includes Jacqueline Dziergwa and Professor Dr. Christopher Bridges from Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf (HHU) has examined the impact of climate change in the form of ocean acidification on these structures. The researchers uncovered damage to the denticles and have reported on their findings in the journal Scientific Reports. (2020-01-08)

Marine biology: Acidified oceans may corrode shark scales
Prolonged exposure to high carbon dioxide (acidified) seawater may corrode tooth-like scales (denticles) covering the skin of puffadder shysharks, a study in Scientific Reports suggests. As ocean CO2 concentrations increase due to human activity, oceans are becoming more acidic, with potential implications for marine wildlife. Although the effects of acidified water have been studied in several species, this is the first observed instance of denticle corrosion as a result of long-term exposure. (2019-12-19)

Healing rays: Whoopi's quick to mend
'Whoopi' the manta ray -- a regular visitor to Western Australia's Ningaloo Reef -- has helped University of Queensland and Murdoch University scientists study rays' impressive ability to heal. (2019-12-19)

Study to help manage shark populations in Pacific Panama
A study in Pacific Panama identifies 11 potential nursery areas of locally common and migratory sharks, which could support shark conservation efforts in the region. (2019-12-11)

New study shows a carnivorous dinosaur species regrew all its teeth every few months
A meat-eating dinosaur species that lived in Madagascar some 70 million years ago replaced all its teeth every couple of months or so, a new study has found, surprising even the researchers. In fact, Majungasaurus grew new teeth roughly two to 13 times faster than those of other carnivorous dinosaurs, says paper lead author Michael D. D'Emic, an assistant professor of biology at Adelphi University. Majungasaurus would form a new tooth in each socket every couple of months. (2019-11-27)

Animals could help humans monitor oceans
Sharks, penguins, turtles and other seagoing species could help humans monitor the oceans by transmitting oceanographic information from electronic tags. (2019-11-27)

Shark proof wetsuit material could help save lives
A new wet suit material tested by Flinders marine researchers can help reduce blood loss caused by shark bites, to reduce injuries and prevent the leading cause of death from shark bites. (2019-11-18)

Whale shark hot spot offers new conservation insights
An international team of researchers, led by marine scientists at King Abdullah University for Science and Technology (KAUST) in Saudi Arabia and including researchers from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) in the USA, has performed an extensive study of whale shark movement and residency in the Red Sea, offering insights for conservation. (2019-11-12)

Shark skin microbiome resists infection
No evidence of infection found in the bacterial community around shark wounds. (2019-11-04)

Lonesome no more: White sharks hang with buddies
White sharks form communities, researchers have revealed. Although normally solitary predators, white sharks (Carcharodon carcharias) gather in large numbers at certain times of year in order to feast on baby seals. (2019-10-21)

Right whale mothers 'whisper' to their calves to avoid attracting predators
As new moms, North Atlantic right whales tone down their underwater vocalizations and 'whisper' to their young calves to avoid attracting predators, a new study by scientists at Syracuse University, Duke University and NOAA Fisheries' Northeast Fisheries Center finds. The study is the first to record examples of this acoustic behavior by mother right whales. (2019-10-10)

Hush, little baby: Mother right whales 'whisper' to calves
A recent study led by Syracuse University biology professor Susan Parks in Biology Letters explores whether right whale mother-calf pairs change their vocalizations to keep predators from detecting them. (2019-10-09)

Infectious disease in marine life linked to decades of ocean warming
New research shows that long-term changes in diseases in ocean species coincides with decades of widespread environmental change. (2019-10-09)

Fossil fish gives new insights into the evolution
An international research team led by Giuseppe Marramà from the Institute of Paleontology of the University of Vienna discovered a new and well-preserved fossil stingray with an exceptional anatomy, which greatly differs from living species. The find provides new insights into the evolution of these animals and sheds light on the recovery of marine ecosystems after the mass extinction occurred 66 million years ago. (2019-10-02)

How sustainable is tuna? New global catch database exposes dangerous fishing trends
In a study published in Fisheries Research, scientists from the Sea Around Us initiative found that global tuna catches have increased over 1,000 per cent in the past six decades, fueled by a massive expansion of industrial fisheries. (2019-10-01)

The private lives of sharks
White sharks are top predators in the marine environment, but unlike their terrestrial counterparts, very little is known about their predatory activity underwater, with current knowledge limited to surface predation events. Now, a team of international scientists has used video- and data-logging technology to shed new light on predator-prey interactions of these mighty sea creatures. Their findings were published on July 4, 2019 in Marine Ecology Progress Series. (2019-10-01)

Basking sharks exhibit different diving behavior depending on the season
Tracking the world's second-largest shark species has revealed that it moves to different depths depending on the time of year. (2019-09-26)

Shark pups lose gains in stressed environments
Scientists compared the growth and body condition of one species of shark in two different environments. They found larger shark pups on degraded reefs grow less and perform worse than smaller pups on pristine reefs. Human-induced stressors, including climate change, put shark populations at risk--they may not be able to adapt fast enough to keep pace with the changes that are happening in their environment. (2019-09-17)

Mako shark tracking off west coast reveals 'impressive' memory and navigation
The largest effort ever to tag and track shortfin mako sharks off the West Coast has found that they can travel nearly 12,000 miles in a year. The sharks range far offshore, but regularly return to productive waters off Southern California, an important feeding and nursery area for the species. (2019-09-11)

Long before other fish, ancient sharks found an alternative way to feed
Researchers from the University of Chicago have used tools developed to explore 3D movements and mechanics of modern-day fish jaws to analyze a fossil fish for the first time. (2019-09-11)

Longline fishing hampering shark migration
Longline fisheries around the world are significantly affecting migrating shark populations, according to an international study featuring a University of Queensland researcher. The study found that approximately a quarter of the studied sharks' migratory paths fell under the footprint of longline fisheries, directly killing sharks and affecting their food supply. (2019-08-20)

These sharks glow in the dark thanks to a newly identified kind of marine biofluorescence
In a study publishing Aug. 8, 2019 in the journal iScience, researchers have identified what's responsible for the sharks' bright green hue: a previously unknown family of small-molecule metabolites. (2019-08-09)

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