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Current Shock Waves News and Events, Shock Waves News Articles.
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The quantum waltz of electrons hints at the next generation of chips
EPFL researchers have successfully measured some of the quantum properties of electrons in two-dimensional semiconductors. This work in the field of spintronics could one day lead to chips that are not only smaller but that also generate less heat. (2017-12-05)

Entangling biological systems
Using green fluorescent proteins obtained from Escherichia coli, researchers at Northwestern University demonstrate quantum mechanical effects from a biological system. (2017-12-05)

Neutron stars on the brink of collapse
The exact characteristics of Neutron stars, the densest objects in the Universe, are still un-known. An international team ofscientists including HITS astrophysicist Dr. Andreas Bauswein has managed to narrow down the size of neutron stars with the aid of computer simulations. The calculations based on data from the LIGO and Virgo observatories suggest that the neutron star radius must be at least 10.7 km. The results have been published in (2017-12-04)

Gravity: A faster method for gauging the size of great quakes
Immediately following Japan's 2011 Tohoku earthquake, while seismic waves still traveled to seismic stations to offer insight into the event's magnitude, seismographs recorded a gravity change reflective of this value, researchers report. (2017-11-30)

New early signals to quantify the magnitude of strong earthquakes
After an earthquake, there is a disturbance in the field of gravity almost instantaneously. This could be recorded before the seismic waves. Researchers from CNRS, IPGP, the Université Paris Diderot and Caltech have managed to observe these weak signals and to understand where they come from. Because they are sensitive to the magnitude of earthquakes, these signals may play an important role in the early identification of the occurrence of a major earthquake. (2017-11-30)

Mass of warm rock rising beneath New England, Rutgers study suggests
Slowly but steadily, an enormous mass of warm rock is rising beneath part of New England, although a major volcanic eruption isn't likely for millions of years, a Rutgers University-led study suggests. The research is unprecedented in its scope and challenges textbook concepts of geology. (2017-11-29)

What helps international students to adapt
Conscious decision-making and internalized intentions, as opposed to extrinsic influencing factors, are the key to a student's successful adaption to life in a foreign country. This was confirmed by research carried out by a group of scientists which included Ken Sheldon, Academic Supervisor and Head of the International Laboratory of Positive Psychology of Personality and Motivation at the Higher School of Economics (HSE). The research was published in the International Journal of Intercultural Relations. (2017-11-28)

Ultrathin and flat graphene metalenses gain morace properties
Lenses made of graphene and precisely pierced gold sheets are able to concentrate terahertz beams to a spot, flip its polarization and modulate its intensity. (2017-11-27)

Push to twist: Achieving the classically impossible in human-made material
Researchers have designed a metamaterial that can twist to the right or the left in response to a straight, solid push. (2017-11-23)

Droplet explosion by shock waves, relevant to nuclear medicine
In a study published in EPJ D, Eugene Surdutovich from Oakland University, Rochester, Michigan, USA and colleagues have examined the possibility of observing the multi-fragmentation of small droplets due to shock waves initiated by ions that passed through them. The discovery of ion-induced shock waves will significantly affect our understanding of how radiation damage occurs in biomolecules due to ions. (2017-11-22)

New method to measure neutron star size uses modeling based on thermonuclear explosions
Neutron stars are made out of cold ultra-dense matter. How this matter behaves is one of the biggest mysteries in modern nuclear physics. Researchers developed a new method for measuring the radius of neutron stars which helps them to understand what happens to the matter inside the star under extreme pressure. (2017-11-22)

Mysterious deep-Earth seismic signature explained
New research on oxygen and iron chemistry under the extreme conditions found deep inside the Earth could explain a longstanding seismic mystery called ultralow velocity zones. Published in Nature, the findings could have far-reaching implications on our understanding of Earth's geologic history, including life-altering events such as the Great Oxygenation Event, which occurred 2.4 billion years ago. (2017-11-22)

Climate changes triggered immigration to America in the 19th century
From Trump to Heinz, some of America's most famous family names and brands trace their origins back to Germans who emigrated to the country in the 19th century. Researchers from the University of Freiburg have now found that climate was a major factor in driving migration from Southwest Germany to North America during the 19th century. The results are published today in Climate of the Past, a journal of the European Geosciences Union. (2017-11-21)

Taking a spin on plasma space tornadoes with NASA observations
New NASA mission results show that tornado-like swirls of space plasma create tumultuous boundaries in the near-Earth environment, letting dangerous high-energy particles slip into near Earth space. (2017-11-17)

New imaging technique peers inside living cells
Called Ultrasound Bioprobe, the non-invasive approach developed at Northwestern University allows researchers to view sub-cellular structures and their mechanical behavior at nanoscale resolution. (2017-11-16)

FIREBIRD II and NASA mission locate whistling space electrons' origins
New research using data from NASA's Van Allen Probes mission and FIREBIRD II CubeSat has shown that plasma waves in space are likely responsible for accelerating high-energy particles into Earth's atmosphere. (2017-11-15)

Physicists mix waves on superconducting qubits
Artificial atoms are a staple of quantum optics experiments. Physicists closely investigate these systems recently: they turned a single artificial atom into a laser, learned to control single photon. This paper reports the unusual wave mixing effects on a single artificial atom in the gigahertz frequency range. The physicists point out that the observed effect could find application in quantum computing. (2017-11-14)

Gravitational waves from merging supermassive black holes will be spotted within 10 years
New research published November 13 in Nature Astronomy predicts that gravitational waves generated by the merger of two supermassive black holes -- the strongest gravitational waves in the universe -- will be detected within 10 years. The study is the first to use real data, rather than computer simulations, to predict when such an observation will be made. (2017-11-13)

The path length of light in opaque media
A transparent substance will allow the light to travel through on a straight line, in a turbid substance the light will be scattered numerous times, travelling on more complicated zig-zag trajectories. But astonishingly, the average total distance covered by the light inside the substance is always the same. (2017-11-10)

Scientists are developing biologically active compounds for an anti-tumor drug
Employees of RUDN University are actively involved in the development of chemical compounds isoxazoles, capable of suppressing the growth of malignant tumors. The results of the study were published in Tetrahedron. (2017-11-09)

'Bursts' of beta waves, not sustained rhythms, filter sensory processing in brain
Scientists at Brown University have found that people and mice alike use brief bursts of beta brainwaves, rather than sustained rhythms, to control attention and perception. (2017-11-08)

Alma's image of red giant star gives a surprising glimpse of the Sun's future
A Chalmers-led team of astronomers has for the first time observed details on the surface of an aging star with the same mass as the Sun. Alma:s images show that the star is a giant, its diameter twice the size of Earth's orbit around the Sun, but also that the star's atmosphere is affected by powerful, unexpected shock waves. The research is published in Nature Astronomy on Oct. 30, 2017. (2017-11-07)

Shocking results of galaxy-cluster collisions
Combining new images from the Very Large Array with X-Ray and visible-light images reveals the spectacular, energetic outcome when clusters of hundreds of galaxies each collide with each other. (2017-11-07)

Lightning-fast communications
Researchers from the University of Utah have discovered that a special kind of perovskite, a combination of an organic and inorganic compound that has the same structure as the original mineral, can be layered on a silicon wafer to create a vital component for the communications system of the future. That system would use the terahertz spectrum, the next generation of communications bandwidth that uses light instead of electricity to shuttle data. (2017-11-06)

Researchers discover new pathway for handling stress
Researchers at the University of California San Diego studying how animals respond to infections have found a new pathway that may help in tolerating stressors that damage proteins. Naming the pathway the Intracellular Pathogen Response or 'IPR,' the scientists say it is a newly discovered way for animals to cope with certain types of stress and attacks, including heat shock. (2017-11-06)

Diffused light shows clear structures
Scientists gain an insight into the fascinating world of atoms and molecules using x-ray microscopes. Ground-breaking research by physicists at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU), the Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron (DESY) in Hamburg, and the University of Hamburg has paved the way towards new imaging techniques. The team of scientists have successfully developed and tested a method which is considerably more effective than conventional procedures. The researchers' findings have recently been published in the renowned journal Nature Physics. (2017-11-06)

First-ever US experiments at new X-ray facility may lead to better explosive modeling
For the first time in the US, time-resolved small-angle x-ray scattering (TRSAXS) is used to observe ultra-fast carbon clustering and graphite and nanodiamond production in the insensitive explosive Plastic Bonded Explosive (PBX) 9502, potentially leading to better computer models of explosive performance. (2017-11-06)

Beyond good vibrations: New insights into metamaterial magic
Metamaterials have amazing potential--think invisibility cloaks and perfect lenses--but they are more likely to be found in a Harry Potter novel than a lab. To help bring them closer to reality, Michigan Technological University's Elena Semouchkina has gone back to basics and demonstrated that the fundamental physics of metamaterials is more complex than scientists once thought. (2017-11-06)

WSU researchers document transformation of graphite into hexagonal diamond
A team of WSU researchers has for the first time observed and recorded the creation of hexagonal diamond under shock compression, revealing crucial details about how it is formed. The discovery could help planetary scientists use the presence of hexagonal diamond at meteorite craters to estimate the severity of impacts. (2017-11-02)

Long-term study of Nicaraguan children reveals key window in which...
Adding proof to a longstanding but previously unconfirmed theory about severe dengue in humans, a new study in children from Nicaragua pinpoints a narrow but critical range of antibody level that enhances reaction to the disease the second time around. (2017-11-02)

Alcohol makes rats more vulnerable to compulsive cocaine use
Rats given alcohol for 10 days prior to cocaine exhibited enhanced cocaine-addiction behavior, including continuing to seek cocaine despite receiving a brief electric shock when they did so, a new study reports. (2017-11-01)

Study identifies bottlenecks in early seagrass growth
A new study by an international research team reveals bottlenecks in the growth of seagrass from seed to seedling, knowledge useful for improving seed-based restoration efforts. (2017-11-01)

Should patients with cardiogenic shock receive culprit lesion only PCI or multivessel PCI?
Results from the prospective, randomized, multicenter CULPRIT-SHOCK trial found that an initial strategy of culprit lesion only percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) reduces the composite of 30-day mortality and/or severe renal failure in patients with multivessel disease and cardiogenic shock complicating acute myocardial infarction. (2017-10-31)

Successful cardiogenic shock treatment using a percutaneous left ventricular assist device
The Cardiovascular Surgery Group at Osaka University succeeded in minimally invasive treatment of a patient with acute heart failure due to medical treatment-resistant cardiogenic shock by making use of Impella, a percutaneous auxiliary artificial heart, for the first time in Japan. This method is anticipated as a new therapy for treating patients with acute heart failure due to medical treatment-resistant cardiogenic shock. (2017-10-31)

Why do some head knocks cause more damage than others?
Veteran sailors know that rogue waves can rise suddenly in mid-ocean to capsize even the largest vessels. Now it appears that a similar phenomenon called shear shock wave occurs in the concussed brain. It may help explain why some head knocks cause so much more harm than others. (2017-10-31)

Monster colliding black holes might lurk on the edge of spiral galaxies
The outskirts of spiral galaxies like our own could be crowded with colliding black holes of massive proportions and a prime location for scientists hunting the sources of gravitational waves, said Rochester Institute of Technology researchers. Their study identifies an overlooked region potentially rife with orbiting black holes. Identifying host galaxies of merging massive black holes could help explain how orbiting pairs of black holes form. (2017-10-30)

Graphene enables high-speed electronics on flexible materials
A flexible detector for terahertz frequencies (1,000 gigahertz) has been developed by Chalmers researchers using graphene transistors on plastic substrates. It is the first of its kind, and can extend the use of terahertz technology to applications that will require flexible electronics, such as wireless sensor networks and wearable technology. The results are published in the scientific journal Applied Physics Letters. (2017-10-30)

Kazan Federal University ionosonde registered an earthquake in Chile
The Cyclone ionosonde (creatied by Dr. Akchurin, Head of the Near Space Studies Lab of SAU AstroChallenge) can detect earthquakes at distances as big as 15,000 kilometers. The paper also states that earthquake signatures for mid-latitude KFU ionosonde can be up to 3 times more prominent than on a low-latitude ionosonde in Japan. (2017-10-26)

Underwater sound waves help scientists locate ocean impacts
Scientists have developed a new method to locate the precise time and location that objects fall into our oceans. (2017-10-24)

Prehospital blood transfusion among combat casualties associated with improved survival
Among medically evacuated US military combat causalities in Afghanistan, blood product transfusion within minutes of injury or prior to hospitalization was associated with greater 24-hour and 30-day survival than delayed or no transfusion, according to a study published by JAMA. (2017-10-24)

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