Current Siblings News and Events

Current Siblings News and Events, Siblings News Articles.
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New discovery sheds light on the mysterious family life of notorious sabre-toothed tiger
New research indicates adolescent offspring of the menacing sabre-toothed predator, Smilodon fatalis, were more momma's cubs than independent warriors. (2021-01-07)

One in five doctors in Sweden has a doctor parent
One in five doctors in Sweden has a parent who is also trained in medicine, more than triple the proportion for doctors born three decades earlier, finds a study in the Christmas issue of The BMJ. (2020-12-16)

Genes play a role in common knee injury
It has long been known that the choice of shoe, surface and type of sport can all be contributing factors when someone suffers an anterior cruciate ligament rupture. Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have now observed that genes also play a decisive role. (2020-12-15)

Bed dust microorganisms may boost children's health
In the most extensive study of its kind, researchers from the University of Copenhagen, in collaboration with the Danish Pediatric Asthma Center at Herlev and Gentofte Hospital, have found a link between microorganisms living in the dust of children's beds and the children's own bacteria. The correlation suggests that microorganisms may reduce a child's risk of developing asthma, allergies and autoimmune diseases later on in life. (2020-11-19)

'Goldilocks' neonatal immune response may protect against autism
The causes of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) - including genetic and environmental factors - are not entirely understood. New research however, shows that the lowest risk for ASD is associated with mid-levels of an immune marker measured at birth - whereas too much or not enough were linked to increased risk. The study hinges on the idea that the developing brain may be particularly vulnerable to disturbances in immune signaling and exposure to inflammation. (2020-11-10)

Positive student-teacher relationships benefit students' long-term health, study finds
Teens who have good, supportive relationships with their teachers enjoy better health as adults, according to research published by the American Psychological Association. Perhaps surprisingly, although friendships are important to adolescents, the study did not find the same link between good peer relationships and students' health in adulthood. (2020-10-29)

Star clusters are only the tip of the iceberg
Star clusters have been part of the Imaginarium of human civilization for millennia. The brightest star clusters to Earth, like the Pleiades, are readily visible to the naked eye. A team around astronomer Stefan Meingast at the University of Vienna has now revealed the existence of massive stellar halos, termed coronae, surrounding local star clusters. The paper was published in ''Astronomy & Astrophysics''. (2020-10-15)

Study of siblings finds moderate cannabis use impacts cognitive functioning
A new study led by researchers from the University of Colorado School of Medicine compares adolescent siblings to determine the impact of early and frequent use of marijuana on cognitive function. This study, published in the journal Addiction, contrasts with previous studies by finding that moderate adolescent cannabis use may have adverse effects that cannot be explained by the genetic or environmental factors that siblings may have in common. (2020-09-03)

ALMA discovers misaligned rings in planet-forming disk around triple stars
Using ALMA, two teams of astronomers have for the first time discovered a planet-forming disk with misaligned rings around a triple star system, called GW Orionis. (2020-09-03)

Antibiotics associated with increased risk of inflammatory bowel disease
Antibiotics use, particularly antibiotics with greater spectrum of microbial coverage, may be associated with an increased risk of new-onset inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and its subtypes ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. That is according to a study by researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden and Harvard Medical School in the United States, published in The Lancet Gastroenterology & Hepatology. The association between antimicrobial treatment and IBD remained when patients were compared with their siblings. (2020-08-17)

Child disability can reduce educational outcomes for older siblings
A recent paper published in The Economic Journal indicates that, in families with disabled children, the second born child is more adversely affected cognitively than the first-born child. (2020-08-13)

Penn researchers identify new genetic cause of a form of inherited neuropathy
Inherited mutations in a gene that keeps nerve cells intact was shown, for the first time, to be a driver of a neuropathy known as Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. This finding is detailed in a study led by researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, presenting a clearer picture of the disease's genetic underpinnings that could inform the development of gene therapies to correct it. (2020-08-03)

Therapy helps children with food allergies manage severe anxiety
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) has launched the Food Allergy Bravery (FAB) Clinic to help children with a phobia of anaphylaxis. This revolutionary clinic, housed within the Food Allergy Center, is the first in the world to bring together psychologists and food allergy experts to treat food allergic children with severe phobia of anaphylaxis. (2020-07-28)

Loss of a co-twin linked to heightened psychiatric risk
The death of a twin, especially earlier in life, can increase the risk of their surviving twin being diagnosed with a psychiatric disorder, finds a new study published today in eLife. (2020-07-14)

About nine family members to suffer grief from every COVID-19 fatality
Deaths from COVID-19 will have a ripple effect causing impacts on the mental health and health of surviving family members. But the extent of that impact has been hard to assess until now. Every death from COVID-19 will impact approximately nine surviving family members, according to a study. (2020-07-13)

Autism risk estimated at 3 to 5% for children whose parents have a sibling with autism
Roughly 3 to 5% of children with an aunt or uncle with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) can also be expected to have ASD, compared to about 1.5% of children in the general population, according to a study funded by the National Institutes of Health. The findings call into question the female protective effect, a theory that females have a lower rate of ASD than males because they have greater tolerance of ASD risk factors. (2020-05-18)

New review of studies shows no link between prenatal antidepressant exposure and autism
A mother's use of antidepressants during pregnancy does not appear to increase her child's risk for autism, according to a new meta-analysis by Jeffrey Newport, M.D., published in the American Journal of Psychiatry. (2020-05-07)

A child's home environment can impact the risk of developing depression
New research, published online today in the American Journal of Psychiatry, finds that children's rearing environment has a meaningful impact on their risk for major depression later in life, and notes the importance supporting of nurturing environments when children are at risk. (2020-04-28)

Mount Sinai researchers unveil mechanisms to prevent Crohn's disease
In a series of four studies published today in Gastroenterology, a journal of the American Gastroenterological Association, Mount Sinai inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) researchers, describe the identification of predictive tools and a new understanding of environmental factors that trigger IBD. (2020-03-26)

University of Miami researchers find an early behavioral marker for autism
Many babies cry or show other signs of distress when a parent departs and they are left behind with a stranger. But secure babies are soothed when the parent returns. That, however, is not the case with babies classified with insecure-resistant attachments, as shown in a new University of Miami study of infants who are at high risk for developing autism. (2020-03-13)

Genes tell a story about diabetic kidney disease
Studying Finnish genes leads to unique revelations about the development of a serious complication of diabetes, and informs an ongoing genomic study of a Singaporean cohort as part of Singapore's Diabetes Study in Nephropathy and other Microvascular Complications (DYNAMO). (2020-03-12)

Not falling far from tree: Ecologists study seed-to-seedling transitions
Ecologists studying spatial patterns of seeds and surviving seedlings among trees on Panama's Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute Forest Dynamics Plot on Barro Colorado Island observed the Hubbell pattern: A large number of seedlings survived under parent trees compared to far away. Findings suggest the strength of mortality experienced from the seed to seedling stage may not be sufficient to promote local diversity. (2020-02-27)

Weight-based bullying linked to increased adolescent alcohol, marijuana us
Adolescents who are bullied about their weight or body shape may be more likely to use alcohol or marijuana than those who are not bullied, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association. (2020-02-25)

Autism eye scan could lead to early detection
A new eye scan could help identify autism in children years earlier than currently possible. The non-invasive eye scan utilises a hand-held device to find a pattern of subtle electrical signals in the retina that are different in children on the autism spectrum, which are directly linked to differences in their brain development. (2020-02-20)

Some antibiotics prescribed during pregnancy linked with birth defects
Children of mothers prescribed macrolide antibiotics during early pregnancy are at an increased risk of major birth defects, particularly heart defects, compared with children of mothers prescribed penicillin, finds a study published by The BMJ today. (2020-02-19)

30-year study identifies need of disease-modifying therapies for maple syrup urine disease
A new study analyzes 30 years of patient data and details the clinical course of 184 individuals with genetically diverse forms of Maple Syrup Urine Disease (MSUD), which is among the most volatile and dangerous inherited metabolic disorders. (2020-01-24)

Siblings of children with intellectual disabilities score high on empathy and closeness
A new Tel Aviv University and University of Haifa study finds that relationships between children and their siblings with intellectual disabilities are more positive than those between typically developing siblings. (2020-01-14)

Genetic testing provides insights to sudden unexplained deaths in Amish community
Using an exome molecular autopsy, Michael Ackerman, M.D., Ph.D., and his associates conducted genetic testing of four siblings who each died suddenly during exercise. Dr. Ackerman is a genetic cardiologist and director of the Windland Smith Rice Comprehensive Sudden Cardiac Death Program at Mayo Clinic. The findings are published in JAMA Cardiology. Dr. Ackerman is the senior author. (2020-01-08)

The mysterious case of the ornamented coot chicks has a surprising explanation
The American coot is a somewhat drab water bird with gray and black feathers and a white beak, common in wetlands throughout North America. Coot chicks, however, sport outrageously bright orange and red feathers, skin, and beaks. A new study explains how the bright coloring of coot chicks fits in with the reproductive strategy of their less colorful parents. (2019-12-30)

Children born preterm are more likely to be placed outside the home
Children born prematurely, i.e. before week 37, are more likely to be placed outside the home as a supportive child welfare measure than their full-term counterparts, according to a population study conducted by the Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare (THL). (2019-12-27)

Leaving home is beneficial for male squirrels but not for females, study shows
In the world of squirrels, moving away from your home turf has better outcomes for males than for females, according to a new study by University of Alberta ecologists. (2019-12-13)

Genome testing for siblings of kids with autism may detect ASD before symptoms appear
One of the key priorities of interventions for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is starting early, with some evidence showing infants as young as seven months old could benefit. Yet, most children in North America aren't diagnosed with ASD until they're over four years of age. New research published in Nature Communications has found testing the DNA of siblings of individuals with ASD may be predictive of a future diagnosis even if symptoms aren't yet apparent. (2019-12-05)

Preterm birth linked to increased rates of diabetes in children and young adults, with certain effects stronger in females
New research shows that preterm birth is linked to increased rates of type 1 and type 2 diabetes in children and young adults, with certain effects stronger in females. People who have been born preterm may need more intensive monitoring and prevention efforts to lower their risk of diabetes, concludes the study, published in Diabetologia (the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes [EASD]). (2019-12-05)

Police killings of unarmed black Americans may have health impacts for nearby unborn black infants
Pregnant black women give birth to infants with smaller birth weights and shorter gestational ages if they live near the site of incidents in which unarmed blacks are killed by police during their first or second trimester, according to a new study. (2019-12-04)

Choking deaths in US children drop by 75% in past 50 years
Children's deaths from choking on small objects dropped by 75% from 1968 to 2017, according to a report published in JAMA. (2019-11-26)

Bloodlines may matter more than love when it comes to health
Strained relationships with parents, siblings or extended family members may be more harmful to people's health than a troubled relationship with a significant other, according to a study published by the American Psychological Association. (2019-11-07)

Which came first: Brain size or drinking propensity?
Contrary to the belief that drinking can literally shrink one's brain, a new study that includes researchers from Arts & Sciences suggests that a small brain might be a risk factor for heavier alcohol consumption. (2019-10-28)

New study debunks myth that only children are more narcissistic than kids with siblings
The stereotype that only children are selfish, or more self-centered than those with siblings is sometimes used as an argument for having more than one child, but researchers from Germany find there's no evidence for the claim that only children are more narcissistic than children with sibling. (2019-10-15)

Children bullied by friends and siblings are more likely to think about suicide in their early 20s
Depression, self-harm and suicidal ideation are more prominent in adults in their early twenties if they were bullied at home and at school, a study by researchers at the University of Warwick have found. Researchers stress that intervention is needed to educate people in bullying to reduce it. (2019-10-09)

UBC study finds siblings of problem gamblers also impulsive, prone to risk-taking
Biological siblings of people with gambling disorder also display markers of increased impulsivity and risk-taking, according to a new UBC psychology study. The findings, published today in Neuropsychopharmacology, suggest people with gambling disorder -- a psychiatric term for serious gambling problems -- may have pre-existing genetic vulnerabilities to the illness. (2019-10-09)

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