Current Side Effects News and Events

Current Side Effects News and Events, Side Effects News Articles.
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Childhood cancer survivors are not more likely to terminate their pregnancies
Study finds they have a reduced likelihood of becoming pregnant, however. (2021-01-25)

ACSL1 as a main catalyst of CoA conjugation of propionic acid-class NSAIDs in liver
Researchers from Kanazawa University have found that propionic acid-class nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), including ibuprofen, form ''conjugates'' with coenzyme A (CoA) by one of the acyl-CoA synthetases, ACSL1, in liver. These conjugates have the covalent binding ability to cellular proteins that may lead to liver injury, a rare severe side effect of NSAID treatment. This knowledge could help pharmaceutical companies to generate pain control options with fewer risks of severe side effects. (2021-01-22)

Strange colon discovery explains racial disparities in colorectal cancer
The colons of African-Americans and people of European descent age differently, new research reveals, helping explain racial disparities in colorectal cancer - the cancer that killed beloved 'Black Panther' star Chadwick Boseman at only 43. (2021-01-21)

Benvitimod cream: a new topical treatment for plaque psoriasis
Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin condition characterized by skin plaques and itching. Currently, the most common topical treatments for psoriasis are corticosteroids and vitamin D3 analogs. But these drugs have various side-effects. A recent phase III clinical trial of the novel non-steroidal compound benvitimod in China, published in Chinese Medical Journal, shows that it is safe and effective and could be a promising new topical treatment for psoriasis. (2021-01-19)

New discovery in breast cancer treatment
Researchers at the University of Adelaide have found new evidence about the positive role of androgens in breast cancer treatment with immediate implications for women with estrogen receptor-driven metastatic disease. (2021-01-18)

NIH officials highlight COVID-19 vaccine facts, unknowns for healthcare providers
Healthcare providers must be able to explain the latest data supporting the safety and efficacy of vaccines for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) so they can strongly encourage vaccination when appropriate while acknowledging that uncertainty and unknowns remain. This message comes from a new commentary co-authored by Anthony S. Fauci, M.D., director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, and other leading NIAID scientists in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine. (2021-01-18)

New delivery method promises relief from antipsychotic medication's adverse side effects
A team of neuroscientists and engineers at McMaster University has created a nasal spray to deliver antipsychotic medication directly to the brain instead of having it pass through the body. (2021-01-15)

Chemotherapy with light; only one injection required
Researchers in South Korea have developed a phototherapy technology that can significantly increase efficiency while reducing the pain of chemotherapy and minimizing side effects after treatment. The research team has developed a cancer-targeted phototherapeutic agent that promises complete elimination of cancer cells without side effects. It involves only one injection and repeated phototherapy. (2021-01-14)

COVID-19 vaccine creates incentive to improve our health
While we wait for our turn to get vaccinated against SARS-CoV-2, we could - and probably should - use the time to make sure we bring our healthiest emotional and physical selves to the treatment, a new review of previous research suggests. (2021-01-13)

Faulty metabolism of Parkinson's medication in the brain linked to severe side effects
Until now, the reason why the drug levodopa (L-Dopa), which reduces the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease, declines in efficacy after a few years' use has been unknown. A side effect that then often occur is involuntary movements. A Swedish-French collaboration, led from Uppsala University, has now been able to connect the problems with defective metabolism of L-Dopa in the brain. The study is published in Science Advances. (2021-01-07)

Ibrutinib with rituximab in previously untreated CLL: indication of added benefit over FCR
Ibrutinib with rituximab in previously untreated CLL: indication of added benefit over FCR. The new drug combination prolongs overall survival in patients in good general health. No study data are available for other patient groups. (2021-01-05)

Heat treatment may make chemotherapy more effective
The study, published in the Journal of Materials Chemistry B, found that ''loading'' a chemotherapy drug on to tiny magnetic particles that can heat up the cancer cells at the same time as delivering the drug to them was up to 34% more effective at destroying the cancer cells than the chemotherapy drug without added heat. (2021-01-05)

New energy conversion layer for biosolar cells
A research team from the Ruhr-Universität Bochum, together with colleagues from Lisbon, has produced a semi-artificial electrode that could convert light energy into other forms of energy in biosolar cells. The technique is based on the photosynthesis protein Photosystem I from cyanobacteria. The group showed that they could couple their system with an enzyme that used the converted light energy to produce hydrogen. (2020-12-21)

Nanotechnology -- nanoparticles as weapons against cancer
Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich researchers have developed a novel type of nanoparticle that efficiently and selectively kills cancer cells, thus opening up new therapeutic options for the treatment of tumors. (2020-12-18)

Oral contraceptive pills protect against ovarian and endometrial cancer
A comprehensive study from Uppsala University, involving more than 250,000 women, shows that oral contraceptive use protects against ovarian and endometrial cancer. The protective effect remains for several decades after discontinuing the use. The study is published in the journal Cancer Research. (2020-12-17)

Colorful, magnetic Janus balls could help foil counterfeiters (video)
Counterfeiters who sell knockoffs of popular shoes, handbags and other items are becoming increasingly sophisticated, forcing manufacturers to find new technologies to stay one step ahead. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Nano have developed tiny ''Janus balls'' that show their colored side under a magnetic field. These microparticles could be useful in inks for anti-counterfeiting tags, which could be verified with an ordinary magnet, the researchers say. (2020-12-16)

Drugs create balancing act for patients with non-small cell lung cancer
Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center and Bloomberg~Kimmel Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy researchers identified a correlation between multisystem immune-related adverse events and improved rates of survival. This new information will be helpful in discussing with patients the spectrum of immune side effects that may occur from immunotherapy and the implications for their future. (2020-12-14)

Rewiring stroke survivors brains could alleviate depression
University of South Australia researchers have made a major breakthrough in the treatment of depression after stroke, using a high frequency brain stimulation device to improve low moods. (2020-12-11)

Immunotherapy improves responses w/o reducing quality of life in early breast cancer
Adding an immune checkpoint inhibitor to the standard chemotherapy regimen for patients with early-stage breast cancer places no greater burden on patients' ability to perform day-to-day activities than chemotherapy alone, new research by Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center investigators shows. (2020-12-10)

Calibrating kidney function for cancer patients
A new model to evaluate kidney function can help clinicians find the right balance between treating cancer and avoiding chemotherapy's dangerous side effects. (2020-12-10)

New treatment could spare early-stage rectal cancer patients life-altering side effects
A new and less invasive treatment developed by Cancer Research UK researchers is safer than standard major surgery for early-stage rectal cancer, giving patients a better quality of life with fewer life-altering side effects, results from a pilot study show. (2020-12-10)

Physicians don't always recognize patients' radiation therapy side effects
Physicians did not recognize side effects from radiation therapy in more than half of breast cancer patients who reported a significant symptom, a new study finds. (2020-12-09)

Drug for rare disorder shows promise for treating herpes viruses
New research shows that the antiviral activity of the drug -- called phenylbutyrate, or PBA -- was even better when used along with acyclovir, a common HSV-1 treatment. When used in combination, less acyclovir is needed to effectively suppress the virus compared to acyclovir alone -- this is important because acyclovir is also known to have toxic side effects in the kidneys. (2020-12-07)

ASH: Off-the-shelf immune drug shows promise in aggressive multiple myeloma
A subcutaneous injection of the immune-boosting drug teclistamab was found to be safe and elicit responses in a majority of patients with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma. (2020-12-05)

Microswimmers move like moths to the light
The Freigeist group at TU Dresden, led by chemist Dr Juliane Simmchen, has studied an impressive behavior of synthetic microswimmers: as soon as the photocatalytic particles leave an illuminated zone, they flip independently and swim back into the light. This promising observation and its analysis was recently published in the scientific journal ''Soft Matter'' as an ''Emerging Investigator'' article. (2020-11-26)

Survival protein may prevent collateral damage during cancer therapy
Australian researchers have identified a protein that could protect the kidneys from 'bystander' damage caused by cancer therapies. The 'cell survival protein', called BCL-XL, was required in laboratory models to keep kidney cells alive and functioning during exposure to chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Kidney damage is a common side effect of these widely used cancer therapies, and the discovery has shed light on how this damage occurs at the molecular level. (2020-11-25)

Early trial hints CAR T cells may combat solid tumors in children with neuroblastoma
A phase 1 trial involving 12 children with relapsed neuroblastoma - a hard-to-treat pediatric cancer - shows that anticancer CAR T cells displayed signs of efficacy against these tumors while avoiding damage to nerve tissue. (2020-11-25)

NSF's National Solar observatory predicts a large sunspot for Thanksgiving
On November 18 scientists from the US National Science Foundation's National Solar Observatory predicted the arrival of a large sunspot just in time for Thanksgiving. Using a special technique called helioseismology, the team has been ''listening'' to changing sound waves from the Sun's interior which beckon the arrival of a large sunspot. (2020-11-24)

A DNA-based nanogel for targeted chemotherapy
Current chemotherapy regimens slow cancer progression and save lives, but these powerful drugs affect both healthy and cancerous cells. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Nano Letters have designed DNA-based nanogels that only break down and release their chemotherapeutic contents within cancer cells, minimizing the impacts on normal ones and potentially eliminating painful and uncomfortable side effects. (2020-11-18)

Dentists from RUDN University found a reason for early deterioration of dental implants
A team of dentists from RUDN University confirmed that a change in the dominant side of chewing is a reason for the early deterioration of dental implants. Such a change makes it more difficult for a patient to get accustomed to an implant and can lead to bone tissue abnormalities. The discovery can help dentists plan the recovery process after implantation surgeries. (2020-11-18)

Scientists reduce levels of molecules that kill neurons in elderly mice with Alzheimer's
Researchers at the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona have developed an antibody fragment that reduces beta-amyloid peptide and tau protein levels, the ultimate cause of neuronal death in Alzheimer's, ameliorating the hallmarks of the disease at its most advanced stage. The research, published in the International Journal of Molecular Sciences, paves the way for a new pharmacological approach to treat Alzheimer's disease. (2020-11-16)

Patients taking statins experience similar side effects from dummy pills
People taking dummy pills and statins experienced similar side effects in a new study. (2020-11-15)

Side effects often attributed to statins were the same for those taking a placebo
Study participants who reported side effects from cholesterol-lowering medications known as statins also reported the same side effects when they unknowingly took placebo pills. These side effects are real, and it appears may be mostly due to the psychological rather than the pharmacological effects of statins since symptoms were consistent when taking the placebo. (2020-11-15)

Predicting the risk of severe side effects of cancer treatment
The risk of serious adverse effects on the blood status and bone marrow of patients during chemotherapy can be predicted by a model developed at Linköping University, Sweden. This research may make it possible to use genetic analysis to identify patients with a high probability of side effects. The study has been published in npj Systems Biology and Applications. (2020-11-12)

A molecule from gut bacteria reduces effect of diabetes medication
The action of metformin, the classic drug used to treat diabetes by stabilizing blood sugar, can be blocked by a molecule from the bacteria in our intestines, a University of Gothenburg study shows. (2020-11-11)

Is proton therapy the silver bullet for children with brain cancer?
How safe is proton therapy for children with brain cancer compared to the conventional x-ray radiation delivered post-surgery? (2020-11-11)

Smart devices to schedule electricity use may prevent blackouts
Power plants generate electricity and send it into power lines that distribute energy to nodes where it can be used. But if the electricity load is more than the system's capacity, transmission can fail, leading to a cascade of failures throughout the electric grid. In the journal Chaos, researchers show demand side control may be an effective solution to stabilizing the reliability of power grids that use a mix of energy generation sources. (2020-11-10)

Boosting treatments for metastatic melanoma
University of Cincinnati clinician-scientist Soma Sengupta, MD, PhD, says that new findings from her and Daniel Pomeranz Krummel's, PhD, team might have identified a treatment-boosting drug to enhance effectiveness of therapies for metastatic cancer and make them less toxic, giving patients a fighting chance at survival and improved quality of life. (2020-11-05)

Safety of HPV vaccines in males
A new analysis published in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology shows that HPV vaccines are safe and well tolerated in the male population, and the side effects that may occur after immunization are similar in both sexes. (2020-11-04)

Active surveillance safe for African Americans with low-risk prostate cancer
Researchers with UC San Diego School of Medicine and Moores Cancer Center say active surveillance is safe for African American men with low-risk prostate cancer. (2020-11-03)

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